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Loyal Opposition

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NEWS
January 7, 1995
In the days since his election to Congress representing the second congressional district, Chaka Fattah has heard both congratulations and condolences. Congratulations for winning a seat in Washington after a bitter primary battle against Lucien Blackwell. Condolences because the Republican sweep of congressional elections ensured that he'd join a House of Representatives stacked with foes. As the the Era of Newt dawned this week in Washington, it was predictable that many Democrats - especially newcomers - might be more than a little intimidated by the Republican surge.
NEWS
May 18, 2011
WE ARE so very conflicted. After an odd primary election season that included contested races for mayor in the Democratic and Republican parties and tight races for City Council, we just sort of expected more campaign hijinks yesterday. It's a good thing that there were no serious, high-profile incidents, right? It feels wrong to us. Here's the run-down of what we heard yesterday. NIMBY & nasty in the 7th The battle in Council's 7th District, which runs from Hunting Park to Juniata Park and Frankford, turned nasty early when when an anonymous flier was posted at polling places accusing former Councilman Dan Savage of trying to force a methadone clinic into a neighborhood that didn't want it. "Say no to Danny Savage!"
SPORTS
September 30, 2006 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Richie Silverman said at the beginning of the year that he thought Glowing Report was the best pacing mare in the country. Although the 5-year-old bay has had a rough time this season, Silverman is not backing down from that claim. Glowing Report took the first step last weekend by winning her elimination race for today's Milton Stakes at Mohawk Racetrack in Ontario. Glowing Report, driven by David Miller, beat Vysoke Tatry by 1 1/2 lengths in 1 minute, 52.3 seconds. Invitro, driven by Paul MacDonell, won the other elim by three-quarters of a length over Loyal Opposition in 1:52.
NEWS
March 16, 1986
Thank you for your March 7 editorial "A red-baiting bullhorn: An empty contra policy," in which you properly demolish the trumped-up thesis of White House communicator Patrick Buchanan, which was published that same day on the Op-ed Page. Your voice is a valuable one in exposing the fraudulence of the Reagan administration's Nicaragua policy. Thank you also for asking us members of the loyal opposition to "Start (our) engines!" Let me start mine by pointing to a single word in your editorial that cuts its effectiveness at least in half.
NEWS
January 1, 1986 | By Nicole Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Kathleen "Cheryl" Miceli will be the only woman and only Democrat on the Hainesport Township Committee this week as she replaces Joan Huston, the first woman ever elected to the board. Miceli, 38, a newcomer to township politics, will be sworn into office at 10 a.m. today, in the township's reorganization meeting. Miceli defeated former Mayor Steven Layman, a Republican who was attempting a political comeback, in November's municipal election. Huston chose not to seek re-election this year, saying that she was "tired," but that she would still keep an eye on committee activities.
NEWS
August 18, 2010
IN J. MATTHEW Wolfe's Aug. 16 op-ed ( "Brownouts: Unsafe & Unsound" ), he states his opinion on several local laws that he believes are unnecessary, including "a law that requires any company seeking to do business with the city pay all of its employees, even those not involved in city work, 150 percent of the higher of the state or federal minimum wage," and that "all of these laws apply nowhere else in Pennsylvania. " First, the local living wage and benefits laws that I sponsored require that certain city contractors pay at least 150 percent of the federal minimum wage with comparable basic health benefits for full-time employees.
FOOD
March 8, 2000 | by Lynn Hoffman, For the Daily News
La Famiglia - one fork 8 S. Front St. 215-922-2803 Itook the Loyal Opposition to La Famiglia. She's the woman who thinks garlic salt is a spice and can't imagine why anyone would drink wine when they could have a nice cup of coffee with cream and Sweet 'n Low. She is not easily impressed by "cuisine," but she was curious about a place that won a fourth star from the Mobil Travel Guide. La Famiglia is at first sight an impressive restaurant. It's got history - 25 years in the same location.
NEWS
January 14, 1995
NEWT'S BOOK ADVANCE I am not a Republican, but I can see nothing wrong with Newt Gingrich making a book deal or any kind of private deal, as long as the taxpayers are not paying for it. As for cashing in on his position, who would want a book if I wrote it? As long as he gives his full attention to his elective duties, getting a great deal of money from a private publisher (if that's the reason) because he's speaker of the House and not because it may be a good book, which is a possibility, doesn't or shouldn't make famous people second-class citizens because of their fame.
NEWS
November 12, 2004
RE THE Nov. 10 op-ed by Christine M. Flowers ("Fair-weather patriots"): While I agree wholeheartedly that talk of moving to Canada in light of last week's election results is extreme and perhaps a bit cowardly, surely she can understand the level of emotion from this election. And it was not just an election. We as a nation were intentionally divided by the right. Their admitted strategy was to play to their base while making no attempt to reach the other side - and they did just that by running on divisive issues like abortion and gay marriage.
NEWS
July 27, 2009
THE FUTURE of the GOP is a hot topic these days. Who is the leader? Should they present themselves as more moderate or more conservative? This type of media template is nothing new - it was also applied to the Dems until they won back Congress in '06. Republicans do have a problem, and it isn't that they've moved too far right. Polls of the party base show the opposite and polling of a wider cross-section of voters show that Obama's big-government policies aren't that popular, unlike his personal poll numbers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 28, 2013
Democratic state Senate President Stephen Sweeney is the other half of Gov. Christie's policy successes in New Jersey. Few of the Republican governor's major initiatives could have happened without Sweeney, who led his party to compromise on spending, taxes, and pensions. For his bipartisan legislative achievements, STEVE SWEENEY has earned the support of voters in his Third District on Nov. 5. He is running against Republican Niki Trunk, an attorney who worked for the State Comptroller's Office.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Al Schmidt, the leader of a dissident faction inside Philadelphia's Republican Party, won a hotly contested race for city commissioner Tuesday, defeating four-term incumbent Joseph Duda, who was backed by the GOP's longtime power structure. The vote leaves the commissioners - long the province of battle-toughened ward leaders schooled in the rough-and-tumble of street-level politics - with two Ph.D.'s among their three members - Schmidt with a doctorate in history from Brandeis University, and a new Democratic commissioner, Stephanie Singer, with a doctorate in mathematics from New York University.
NEWS
October 31, 2011 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, gambacd@phillynews.com 215-854-5994
THE BATTLE for Northeast Philadelphia's 10th Councilmanic District has something that's as rare in this city as October snow: A race between a Republican and a Democrat that might go right down to the wire. City Councilman Brian O'Neill, the Republican minority leader, has held the seat since 1979 and faced little in the way of serious challengers over the years. "I don't have close elections," O'Neill said last week. The comment was more a statement of fact than a boast.
NEWS
May 18, 2011
WE ARE so very conflicted. After an odd primary election season that included contested races for mayor in the Democratic and Republican parties and tight races for City Council, we just sort of expected more campaign hijinks yesterday. It's a good thing that there were no serious, high-profile incidents, right? It feels wrong to us. Here's the run-down of what we heard yesterday. NIMBY & nasty in the 7th The battle in Council's 7th District, which runs from Hunting Park to Juniata Park and Frankford, turned nasty early when when an anonymous flier was posted at polling places accusing former Councilman Dan Savage of trying to force a methadone clinic into a neighborhood that didn't want it. "Say no to Danny Savage!"
NEWS
April 24, 2011 | By Kevin Ferris, Inquirer Columnist
Two potential futures for the Philadelphia Republican Party were on display during debates for mayor and at-large Council candidates Wednesday night. Future No. 1 is the status quo. Remain a party content with electrifying 12.5 percent of the voters in mayoral races, election after election after election. Find placeholders to take up space on the ballot, not viable, legitimate candidates whom voters can enthusiastically support. Put more energy into internal party squabbles than challenging Democrats and their policies.
NEWS
August 18, 2010
IN J. MATTHEW Wolfe's Aug. 16 op-ed ( "Brownouts: Unsafe & Unsound" ), he states his opinion on several local laws that he believes are unnecessary, including "a law that requires any company seeking to do business with the city pay all of its employees, even those not involved in city work, 150 percent of the higher of the state or federal minimum wage," and that "all of these laws apply nowhere else in Pennsylvania. " First, the local living wage and benefits laws that I sponsored require that certain city contractors pay at least 150 percent of the federal minimum wage with comparable basic health benefits for full-time employees.
NEWS
November 4, 2009 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Controller Alan Butkovitz will cruise into his second four-year term in January after dominating Republican Al Schmidt at the polls yesterday. Butkovitz, a Democrat, won by a ratio of more than 2-1, according to unofficial returns with 95 percent of precincts reporting. That is less than the 7-1 ratio of Democrats to Republicans in Philadelphia, but consistent with Democratic-Republican contests in recent years. "It's an affirmation of the work we've been doing for the past four years, and an affirmation of the work of the professionals in the Controller's Office," said Butkovitz, 57, who first won in 2005 after 15 years in the state House.
NEWS
July 27, 2009
THE FUTURE of the GOP is a hot topic these days. Who is the leader? Should they present themselves as more moderate or more conservative? This type of media template is nothing new - it was also applied to the Dems until they won back Congress in '06. Republicans do have a problem, and it isn't that they've moved too far right. Polls of the party base show the opposite and polling of a wider cross-section of voters show that Obama's big-government policies aren't that popular, unlike his personal poll numbers.
NEWS
February 26, 2009 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
CANTOR. Boehner. McConnell. Pence. They're the ones who are supposed to articulate the position of the loyal opposition. Instead it's a guy named Santelli, and unlike these members of Congress, he has no portfolio. Still, he did something none of the 178 House Republicans who voted against the stimulus package were able to: Give a voice to individuals who refuse to get on board with the president. Last Thursday, news outlets detailed President Obama's plan to help homeowners stave off foreclosure while providing billions' worth of financial backing to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The day's headlines hit on the hefty price tag: "Housing Bailout at $275 Billion" reported the Wall Street Journal, while "$275 Billion Plan Seeks to Address Crisis in Housing" led the front page of the New York Times.
NEWS
November 14, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
In the last two years as top leader of the Republican-controlled state Senate, Joseph B. Scarnati III has stood between Gov. Rendell and the success of his legislative agenda at nearly every turn. Now, in what is likely a first for Pennsylvania, Scarnati, the Senate president pro tempore, takes office as lieutenant governor in the Democratic Rendell administration following the death of Catherine Baker Knoll. Knoll, 78, the first woman elected lieutenant governor, died Wednesday of complications from neuroendocrine cancer.
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