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Loyalists

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NEWS
October 2, 1990 | By S. A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was Tony Zecca and Dave Horn and Sandy Fox and Nancy Williams and, of course, the numbers and political guru, Martin Weinberg - the veterans and volunteers of the Rizzo years in City Hall and the comeback campaigns. They ate brownies and pizza on the 21st floor of the Metro Bank Building in Center City, while a steady parade of camera crews and reporters trampled into the cavernous office where Frank L. Rizzo was beginning his fifth try for mayor. He's 2-2. In 1971, Rizzo - the former police commissioner and a Democrat - saved the Democratic Party from losing control of City Hall.
NEWS
December 20, 2002 | By Dick Polman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Trent Lott's conservative allies, seeking to bolster the Senate Republican leader in his fight for survival, are increasingly deploying what can be called the Double Standard Defense. They contend that Lott is being pilloried only because he is a Republican, and that errant Democrats have gotten off easy for making racially crude remarks, with the help of their media friends. Actually, conservatives are deeply split over Lott. One faction seeks his ouster; as Rich Galen, a former aide to a previous Senate Republican leader, Newt Gingrich, said the other day: "My desire for him to get out of the way has intensified.
NEWS
May 22, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Scrutiny in U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's federal corruption trial turned Friday toward two of the Philadelphia congressman's longtime loyalists accused of involvement in a 2008 scheme to use stolen funds to pay back a $1 million campaign loan. Karen Nicholas and Robert Brand, codefendants in Fattah's racketeering conspiracy case, led organizations that prosecutors say misappropriated contributions and federal grant funds to cover Fattah's debt. Former executives of both entities testified that they were not consulted on a series of contracts that Nicholas and Brand allegedly drafted to make money transfers appear legitimate.
NEWS
October 16, 2011 | By Kim Gamel and Rami Al-Shaheibi, Associated Press
TRIPOLI, Libya - The Libyan capital saw its first major gun battle since Moammar Gadhafi fled Tripoli more than two months ago, as his supporters traded fire with revolutionary forces Friday after a crowd raised the ousted regime's green flag. Fearing more attacks, revolutionary forces set up checkpoints across the metropolis of two million people, snarling traffic. They also rounded up several suspected African mercenaries, pulling them from cars and houses. The violence in Tripoli and fierce resistance on two other fronts set back the new rulers' stated goals of declaring total victory and establishing democracy as Gadhafi, the ruler for nearly 42 years, remains on the run. The capital has been relatively calm since the rebels swept into the city in late August.
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Ahmed al-Haj, Associated Press
SAN'A, Yemen - Loyalists of former Yemeni leader Ali Abdullah Saleh seized the country's main airport Saturday as tanks and armored vehicles occupied the tarmac and forced authorities to cancel flights, a day after a military shake-up in which key commanders were fired. Driving pickup trucks mounted with antiaircraft guns, armed tribesmen along with troops in uniform blasted buildings of San'a International Airport and opened fire on one of the airport surveillance towers before surrounding the entire complex, blocking roads and turning away passenger vehicles.
NEWS
February 4, 2001 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy was shocked, shocked, that politics had played a role in John Ashcroft's Senate career and earlier when he was attorney general and governor of Missouri. "We know that he has . . . used litigation and legislation in creative and inappropriate ways to advance his political and ideological goals," thundered the Massachusetts senator as he laid out the Democrats' case against Ashcroft's nomination before it was approved last week. "How can we have any confidence at all that he won't do the same thing . . . as attorney general?"
NEWS
August 6, 2004 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
There are several reasons why about 15,000 rabid Rush fans turned up - and in the case of lawn-dwellers, endured monsoonlike conditions for a spell - at the Tweeter Center on Wednesday to help the Canadian progressive-rock trio celebrate its 30th anniversary. Naturally, the children of WMMR and WYSP came for radio warhorses such as "Tom Sawyer," "Working Man" and the brilliant "Spirit of the Radio," which they greeted like rock gospel. And there's the band's legendary instrumental prowess, particularly the clinical precision of drummer-lyricist Neil Peart, whose solo segment started as a melodic exchange between marimba and tom-toms, and climaxed in a stomping swing number with triggered horn sounds.
NEWS
March 3, 1992 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Reward your friends, punish your enemies - that's what they say in politics. Mayor Rendell has made his move to control the politically charged Philadelphia Parking Authority, naming his law partner, the co-chair of his transition team, and a key supporter from the labor movement to the authority's five-member board. The Parking Authority is the largest source of Democratic patronage in city government, with more than 700 jobs exempt from civil service regulations. Rendell, a Democrat, has promised big changes and deep cuts at the agency, which writes tickets, tows cars, and runs city-owned parking garages.
NEWS
June 16, 1988 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Determined to deliver the healthiest possible economy to George Bush on Election Day, the Reagan administration is making plans to keep its top economic management jobs in the hands of the vice president's closest political confidants. Currently, economic policy is being run by Treasury Secretary James A. Baker 3d, a longtime friend and political adviser to Bush. But Baker, a fellow Texan who managed Bush's 1980 presidential bid and was chairman of the GOP general election campaigns in 1976, 1980 and 1984, is expected to resign this summer to again run Bush's presidential campaign, campaign sources say. Yesterday, Baker told reporters questioning him about his plans, "For now, my job is at the Treasury Department.
NEWS
July 8, 2011 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four times a week at the Philadelphia Sports Club in Society Hill, a band of masochistic loyalists gathers to do Scott Dougherty's bidding. The glass-and-mirrors exercise room overlooks Fifth Street, so passersby in the mood for a little schadenfreude can watch them suffer. The exercises may seem routine. The crunch. The lunge. The plank. The push-up. But Dougherty's repertoire is expansive and fierce, with complicated moves bearing exotic names like the Turkish Get-Up, which should be outlawed by the Geneva Conventions.
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NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis and John Timpane, STAFF WRITERS
Heather Costello was strap-hanging in a subway car barreling toward the Democratic National Convention on Tuesday - unaware she was also barreling into a verbal brawl. The Arizona emergency-room doctor was in Philadelphia with a backpack, reawakened ideals, and a T-shirt that proclaimed: THE REVOLUTION. Costello, 46, had come for Bernie Sanders. She had come to be part of an antiestablishment uprising she had never seen in a life of watching middle-class wages and liberal policies disappear.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Joseph Jaafari, Staff Writer
FORMER MASSACHUSETTS Congressman Barney Frank gave a scathing speech at the Democratic National Convention's LGBT Caucus on Tuesday afternoon, aimed at "Bernie or Bust"-ers who vowed to not vote for Hillary Clinton. Frank, who was one of the first openly gay people in Congress, said he believed it was his and other Democrats' "special mission" to persuade Sanders supporters to vote for Clinton, adding that Sanders loyalists were willing to do harm to the LGBT community for their own "superior moral political position.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
The tech-loving kid who grew up to be president of the South Jersey Radio Association was just 14 when he first messaged the universe. "I said something like, 'My name is Ken. My location is Clementon, New Jersey,' " Ken Botterbrodt recalls. "I was in the basement with an 18-watt transmitter I built from parts of TV sets. I sent a signal out, and somebody - a guy in Michigan - came back. "It was magical. " As Botterbrodt and other association members mark the centennial of the oldest continuously operating club of its kind in North America (sjra.org)
NEWS
May 22, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Scrutiny in U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's federal corruption trial turned Friday toward two of the Philadelphia congressman's longtime loyalists accused of involvement in a 2008 scheme to use stolen funds to pay back a $1 million campaign loan. Karen Nicholas and Robert Brand, codefendants in Fattah's racketeering conspiracy case, led organizations that prosecutors say misappropriated contributions and federal grant funds to cover Fattah's debt. Former executives of both entities testified that they were not consulted on a series of contracts that Nicholas and Brand allegedly drafted to make money transfers appear legitimate.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | By Esam Mohamed, Associated Press
WADI DINAR, Libya - New fighting flared in a hilltop town in Libya on Tuesday between fighters defending Bani Walid, a stronghold of slain dictator Moammar Gadhafi's regime and pro-government militias trying to win control. A military spokesman, Gen. Ali al-Shekhili, said there was still some resistance, but the pro-government forces had made significant advances toward the center of the town. Many residents had fled over the last few days, he said. The violence in Bani Walid coincided with celebrations of the anniversary of the declaration of liberation of Libya from Gadhafi's dictatorship after an eight-month civil war. A year later, Libya is still fractured by rival militias, tribes and armed backers of the old regime, and the government is struggling to impose its authority.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Max Seddon, Associated Press
KHIMKI, Russia - President Vladimir Putin's loyalists appeared likely Sunday to retain their hold in thousands of local elections that offered slightly more room for competition, but were marred by opposition claims of widespread vote fraud. The Kremlin eased stiff election laws in response to major protests against Putin's rule last winter, but introduced new restrictions after the demonstrations abated. Kremlin-approved governors and most of the incumbent mayors appeared poised to preserve their seats and the Kremlin's main United Russia party will likely keep dominating local legislatures and municipal councils.
SPORTS
August 5, 2012 | By Bill Lyon, For The Inquirer
There is an unspoken covenant between the professional baseball team of Philadelphia and the raving lunatic loyalists who support it with what can only be described as impassioned, unconditional tough love. And that covenant is this: As long as you are trying, really, really, really trying to build a winner, we will support you. We will put up with those $20 beers (not yet but inevitable, along with the $30 parking, etc. etc. etc.). And we will continue to snap up those bobbleheads and those Hunter Pence tees (instant memorabilia)
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - The gunmen walked into an apartment building before dawn earlier this month in the quiet Damascus suburb of Jaramana, went to the fifth floor and knocked on the door. When the police commander opened up, the men shot him dead and left. Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's opponents appear to be resorting increasingly to assassinations of loyalist military officers in an escalation of their campaign to bring down the regime. At least 10 senior officers, including several generals, have been gunned down in the last three months, many of them as they left their homes in the morning to head to their posts.
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Ahmed al-Haj, Associated Press
SAN'A, Yemen - Loyalists of former Yemeni leader Ali Abdullah Saleh seized the country's main airport Saturday as tanks and armored vehicles occupied the tarmac and forced authorities to cancel flights, a day after a military shake-up in which key commanders were fired. Driving pickup trucks mounted with antiaircraft guns, armed tribesmen along with troops in uniform blasted buildings of San'a International Airport and opened fire on one of the airport surveillance towers before surrounding the entire complex, blocking roads and turning away passenger vehicles.
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