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Lucille Ball

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1989 | By Bart Andrews, Special to the Daily News
Lucille Ball recalls the creation of the Ricardos in June 1951: "We were middle class, we had a typical brownstone apartment in New York, and we had problems with the washing machine and with paying the baby sitter. "We always talked about expenses and the budget. I could identify with Lucy and Ricky. I wanted her to be an average housewife. A very nosy but very average housewife. And then the writers came up with the older married couple, which made two generations of marrieds - the four of us - and from there we sailed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1986 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Channels 3, 6 and 10 will air Mayor Goode's response to the MOVE Commission report on Sunday at 6:30 p.m. and, immediately following the live broadcast, Channel 6 will present a half-hour report titled "Philadelphia After Move, A Closer Look. " The program, hosted by Jim Gardner and Vernon Odom, examines the impact on the city of the May 13 confrontation between MOVE members and police. Channel 29 says it won't air the mayor's response live but will cover it during the station's regular 10 p.m. newscast the following day. Channels 3, 6 and 10 are pre-empting their network newscasts to cover the mayor live.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International, People magazine and the Los Angeles Daily News
Lucille Ball, the flame-tressed clown queen of television, died yesterday in Los Angeles of a ruptured abdominal artery, eight days after open-heart surgery. She was 77. She had been making a strong recovery and was moved out of the cardiac- intensive-care unit at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center earlier this week. On Monday, she left her bed several times and was joking with the hospital staff. But shortly before dawn yesterday, she went into cardiac arrest because of internal bleeding and could not be revived after 47 minutes of resuscitation efforts, said hospital spokesman Ronald Wise.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sweden will honor native son Daniel Solander, who went abroad to England and the South Pacific to earn renown as a botanist. Two commemoratives, both 8 kronor, will be issued Aug. 16. One stamp bears a portrait of Solander and the other shows the ship Endeavour, captained by James Cook. Solander (1733-1782) studied at the University of Uppsala under Carl von Linn? (also known as Carl Linnaeus), the Swede who first classified plants and is regarded as the father of botany.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1989 | By Barbara Beck, Daily News Staff Writer
While everybody loved Lucy, they didn't always love Lucille. Many a businessman has earned his dinner by telling tales at parties about Lucille Ball's tenacity during rehearsals. She could pause in midsentence to cuss out a lighting man for using the wrong filter - and then pick up the line right where she'd left off, without losing a beat. While we suffered with her the Indignity of the Week, from pies to pratfalls, waterbags to windstorms, and watched with admiration as the old Ball bounced from the back lot to the board room at Desilu, she was playing Big Boss.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1989 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
Lucille Ball was television's first female superstar - in fact, among the first generation of TV idols, only Milton Berle gave her any real competition in popularity. But Ball was the real television pioneer. Where Berle simply transferred his vaudeville act to a similarly styled variety show, Lucille Ball revolutionized TV comedy by perfecting the classic sitcom format. Ball, who died yesterday at the age of 77, was a beguiling paradox, a shrewd businesswoman and accomplished technician who became famous for being a squawking, scatterbrained housewife.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1990 | By Kay Gardella, New York Daily News
All you Lucille Ball lovers out in TV-land, you're in for a nice surprise. The audition tape (these days known as a pilot) for "I Love Lucy," which runs 34 minutes, and which has never been on television, has been found and will be seen in May as part of a CBS special devoted to Lucy. The tape - actually a kinescope, a film shot from a TV monitor - was uncovered by Bud Grant, CEO of the Grant/Tribune Co. According to Grant, a former long-time programming boss at CBS, the tape was labeled "Lucy-Desi- Pepito Audition.
NEWS
April 22, 2011
Madelyn Pugh Davis, 90, who with her writing partners for the classic sitcom I Love Lucy concocted zany scenes in which the harebrained Lucy dangles from a hotel balcony, poses as a sculpture, or stomps and wrestles in a vat full of grapes, died Wednesday at her home in the Bel Air section of Los Angeles. Clever turns of phrase were not grist for the comedy mill that Ms. Davis, along with Bob Carroll Jr. and the producer Jess Oppenheimer, began running out of a studio back office in 1951.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | BY LARRY MCMULLEN
Dear Larry: You have made a terrible mistake! You stated that Lucille Ball played small parts in forgettable movies. Well, you are wrong, wrong, wrong! L. Ball was a Big Star. She made "A" movies with male stars, not bit parts. Bob Hope, Henry Fonda ("Yours, Mine, Ours"). William Holden ("Miss Grant Takes Richmond"). I could go on and on. You should check your facts I realize this is before your time. Please don't denigrate one of our most delightful singing, dancing, comedic and dramatic, yes, also dramatic, entertainers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1989 | By Bart Andrews, Special to the Daily News
Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz met in May 1940 at the Hollywood studios of RKO Pictures. Arnaz had been summoned to the West Coast to reprise his Broadway role as Manuelito in the movie version of the Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart musical "Too Many Girls. " Director George Abbott introduced Desi to Lucy in the studio commissary one lunchtime. They fell in love almost immediately. "But the studio didn't want us to get married. The gossip columnists kept telling the reasons why we shouldn't get married," Arnaz offers.
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NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lucy, the scary version Residents of Celoron, N.Y., are proud TV and film icon Lucille Ball was born in their town. They love her. Dearly. What they don't love so much is a statue of Lucy by artist Dave Poulin that was erected in town in 2009. It's not just that the comedian looks like a demented serial killer. The face is all wrong - the eyes big and monstrous, the teeth threatening and prominent, the hair kind of masculine. Concerned citizens have spent six years trying to persuade town leaders to redo the piece or get rid of it. Celoron Mayor Scott Schrecengost tells the Post-Journal in Jamestown, N.Y., he doesn't want to waste any more taxpayer money on the statue.
NEWS
December 20, 2013
BRAVERY IS one of the greatest attributes an actor can claim. Playing a reviled person (e.g. Kevin Bacon as the ex-con child molester in "The Woodsman") is generally hailed within the show-business community. But Thursday at the Merriam Theater, Philadelphians will get a glimpse of true theatrical valor when "I Love Lucy Live on Stage" opens a four-night run. From here, it seems portraying Lucy Ricardo - arguably the most beloved and iconic female character of all time in any medium - is a no-win proposition.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
HAD JENNIFER CHILDS' youthful dreams materialized, she'd have been a leading light in the Royal Shakespeare Company. But had she worn the crowns of such characters as Anne Boleyn or Isabelle, wife of Richard II, in Stratford-on-Avon and London, she never would have achieved her exalted status as Philadelphia's Queen of Comedy. For more than a decade, the 44-year-old strawberry-blonde has reigned as local theater's answer to Carol Burnett or Lucille Ball - a gifted performer who'd rather take a pie in the face than rip your heart out with a sober soliloquy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2011
Theater 1812 Productions: Mistakes Were Made Philadelphia premiere featuring Scott Greer. Closes 10/30. Plays & Players Theatre, 1714 Delancey Pl.; 215-592-9560. 1812productions.org. $20. A Play, a Pie & a Pint See several one-act plays from U.S. & U.K. playwrights while enjoying a slice of pie & a drink. Closes 10/26. Society Hill Playhouse, 507 S. 8th St. $15. All Hands on Deck! Four performers & a backing orchestra present a lively mix of popular & patriotic '40s tunes & comedy bits.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2011 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
* 2 BROKE GIRLS. 8:30 tonight, CBS3. IT'S WEIRD to think a television show that includes the line "This is the sound that dries up my vagina" within the first five minutes could be considered retro, but that's exactly what "2 Broke Girls" is. Unlike the mockumentary sitcom style of "Modern Family" or "The Office," "2 broke Girls" shoots in front of a live studio audience with multiple cameras. To Beth Behrs, who plays the riches-to-rags Caroline, the familiar sounds of real people laughing at the jokes reminds her of the shows she used to love, like "Friends" and "Will and Grace.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2011
Happy birthday, Lucille Ball: Looking good at 100 From Carrie Rickey's "Flickgrrl" http://www.philly.com/flickgrrl Lucille Ball, the long-stemmed looker born Aug. 6, 1911, came to Hollywood when she was 22. For two decades, mostly at RKO Pictures, she was cast as dime-a-dance dames, b-girls, and burlesque queens, ever the wisecracker, never the star. But she had the last laugh. In the early 1950s, the studios lived in dread of television, refusing to sell their old films for broadcast or permit their stars to appear on the small screen.
NEWS
April 22, 2011
Madelyn Pugh Davis, 90, who with her writing partners for the classic sitcom I Love Lucy concocted zany scenes in which the harebrained Lucy dangles from a hotel balcony, poses as a sculpture, or stomps and wrestles in a vat full of grapes, died Wednesday at her home in the Bel Air section of Los Angeles. Clever turns of phrase were not grist for the comedy mill that Ms. Davis, along with Bob Carroll Jr. and the producer Jess Oppenheimer, began running out of a studio back office in 1951.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2005 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The dead are still quite entertaining. Thus, Lucille Ball has been declared the most beloved star beneath the grass, the Associated Press says. Though they've gone to meet their maker and their earthworm, to paraphrase writer Robert Penn Warren (also deceased), dead stars are still popular, according to Marketing Evaluations Inc., which conducted a survey measuring the reputations of entertainers who have floated beyond the River Styx. Other favorite coffin jockeys include Bob Hope, John Wayne and Red Skelton.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2001 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Desi Arnaz Jr. has got some 'splainin' to do. The generally warm and amusing I Love Lucy tribute that he and his sister produced for CBS seems to trail off into deep sap for a few minutes about three-quarters of the way through. Backed by Arturo Sandoval on trumpet, he and Lucie sit there on I Love Lucy's 50th Anniversary Special, airing tonight at 9, singing "Patria," a song about the glories of homeland that seems over the top even in this show. "This is very powerful for me because of Dad's feelings of how much he loved this country and how he impressed that upon me: not to take the freedoms of this country for granted," Desi Jr. said in an interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sweden will honor native son Daniel Solander, who went abroad to England and the South Pacific to earn renown as a botanist. Two commemoratives, both 8 kronor, will be issued Aug. 16. One stamp bears a portrait of Solander and the other shows the ship Endeavour, captained by James Cook. Solander (1733-1782) studied at the University of Uppsala under Carl von Linn? (also known as Carl Linnaeus), the Swede who first classified plants and is regarded as the father of botany.
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