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Lucinda Williams

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1997 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Before she sang a single note at the Theater of Living Arts on Sunday, Lucinda Williams apologized to the capacity crowd for not having a new CD to plug. "It's not because I'm a difficult diva or a demanding perfectionist," said the extraordinary singer-songwriter, who was characterized just that way in a profile in Sunday's New York Times magazine. The article, entitled "Lucinda Williams Is in Pain," cited Williams as the primary obstacle to the release of her album Car Wheels on a Gravel Road.
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
Lucinda Williams is matchless in her ability to put elusive emotions into words. In "Changed the Locks," which showed up near the end of her two-hour set at the Scottish Rite Auditorium in Collingswood on Saturday night, she turned the bad-blood end of a relationship into a creation myth; after locking her ex out in the cold, the song's protagonist moves train tracks and renames towns to hide her path, simultaneously exulting in her own power and admitting...
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With 2014's Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone , Lucinda Williams put her roots country-rocking money where her mouth has long been and released an album on a label of her own, Highway 20 Records. Her robust lyricism, blunt musicality, and distinctly rusty vocal tones have put her in a league of her own since 1979's Ramblin' on My Mind . Frankly, Williams never did sound like any other alt-country presence, as she proved once more on Tuesday night at Theatre of Living Arts.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With 2014's Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone , tousle-haired Lucinda Williams put her roots country-rocking money where her mouth has long been and released an album on a label of her own, Highway 20 Records. Her robust lyricism, blunt musicality and distinctly rusty vocal tones have put her in a league of her own since 1979's Ramblin' on My Mind . Frankly, Williams never did sound like any other alterna-country presence, a fact she proved once more on Tuesday night at Theatre of Living Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1998 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nothing comes easy for Lucinda Williams. The Nashville singer-songwriter and drama queen so skilled at turning her troubles into soul-wrenching art has had a rough couple of days. First, her flight to Philadelphia ran into turbulence - the kind that has you thinking about forgiveness and making amends, she says - and had to be routed to Baltimore. After arriving better-late-than-never to her sold-out show at the Theatre of Living Arts, she delivered a tour de force performance on two hours' sleep, and displayed complete command of the Southern roots-music idioms she holds dear.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1992 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Visibility-wise, it's probably good for Lucinda Williams that Mary-Chapin Carpenter covered one of her songs. Williams' career has been filled with false starts and uphill struggles. Carpenter's is a smooth, steady trajectory that shows no signs of abating. That means Carpenter's version of Williams' 1988 gem "Passionate Kisses," available on the country/folk singer's current Come On Come On, will reach more ears than the original ever did. There's nothing particularly wrong with Carpenter's "Passionate Kisses.
NEWS
March 27, 1989 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
If you wanted to foil an aggressive ex, you'd change your phone number, maybe the lock on your front door. Lucinda Williams wouldn't stop there. She'd change the "tracks underneath the train," or the name of the town, if she thought it would help. The notion comes from her song "Changed the Locks," but it's a good indication of the Louisiana-born Williams' real-life determination. She has a sure, Southern drive that comes across as hellbent persistence. Vying for love or the creature comforts she lists on "Passionate Kisses," Williams asks, "Shouldn't I have this?"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2012
Film New this week: Sparkle *** This remake, which shifts the action from 1950s Harlem to 1960s Detroit, is notable for many reasons, chief among them that it marks the last movie appearance of Whitney Houston. She plays Emma, the strict single mother of three daughters who make a splash as a Supremes-like trio. If you're like me, you'll lose it when Houston takes uneasy flight with "His Eye Is on the Sparrow. " Directed by Salim Akil (maker of the sprightly Jumping the Broom )
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1992 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If nothing else, Tuesday's bill at the Trocadero promised an evening of great songs. Though he's touring to promote a hopelessly average album (Burning Questions), headliner Graham Parker is responsible for some of the cleverest pub-rock ever. And opener Lucinda Williams specializes in blunt, crystal-clear songs that straddle the country-rock divide without pandering to either side. Only Williams and her exceptional trio delivered greatness with any consistency. Parker and his band, the Small Clubs, which featured veteran bassist Graham Maby and drummer Gary Burke, were bent on obscurity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2016
Lucinda Williams "I'm next of kin to all the ghosts of Highway 20," Lucinda Williams sings on the title song of her new album, articulating the main theme for the two-CD set inspired by her native South. After starting out four decades ago in the blues and going on to become the queen of Americana, the 62-year-old Williams here distills all her roots influences into a sound that, with few exceptions ("Doors of Heaven," "Bitter Memory") is not recognizably blues, country, or folk, but remains spellbinding - a natural extension of her earlier work that also stakes out some new territory.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With 2014's Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone , Lucinda Williams put her roots country-rocking money where her mouth has long been and released an album on a label of her own, Highway 20 Records. Her robust lyricism, blunt musicality, and distinctly rusty vocal tones have put her in a league of her own since 1979's Ramblin' on My Mind . Frankly, Williams never did sound like any other alt-country presence, as she proved once more on Tuesday night at Theatre of Living Arts.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With 2014's Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone , tousle-haired Lucinda Williams put her roots country-rocking money where her mouth has long been and released an album on a label of her own, Highway 20 Records. Her robust lyricism, blunt musicality and distinctly rusty vocal tones have put her in a league of her own since 1979's Ramblin' on My Mind . Frankly, Williams never did sound like any other alterna-country presence, a fact she proved once more on Tuesday night at Theatre of Living Arts.
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
Lucinda Williams is matchless in her ability to put elusive emotions into words. In "Changed the Locks," which showed up near the end of her two-hour set at the Scottish Rite Auditorium in Collingswood on Saturday night, she turned the bad-blood end of a relationship into a creation myth; after locking her ex out in the cold, the song's protagonist moves train tracks and renames towns to hide her path, simultaneously exulting in her own power and admitting...
NEWS
January 21, 2013
Pop Various Artists West of Memphis: Voices of Justice (Legacy **1/2) This collection is inspired by the trials of Damien Echols, Jesse Misskelley Jr., and Jason Baldwin, the Arkansas men known as the West Memphis 3. They were freed in 2011 after spending more than 18 years in prison on murder charges - in a case in which their love of heavy metal music was used as evidence against them. The 15-track CD accompanies Peter Jackson and Fran Walsh's West of Memphis , the fourth documentary made in protest against the unjust treatment of the three.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2012
Film New this week: Sparkle *** This remake, which shifts the action from 1950s Harlem to 1960s Detroit, is notable for many reasons, chief among them that it marks the last movie appearance of Whitney Houston. She plays Emma, the strict single mother of three daughters who make a splash as a Supremes-like trio. If you're like me, you'll lose it when Houston takes uneasy flight with "His Eye Is on the Sparrow. " Directed by Salim Akil (maker of the sprightly Jumping the Broom )
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2012 | Choose one .
He looks as studly, dewy-fresh and baby-faced as the day he modeled his sparking-white briefs in 1983's Risky Business. It's hard to believe that Tom Cruise, who turns 50 in July, has never had a nip, tuck, lift or lipo in his life. "I haven't, and I never would," Tom tells Playboy on the set of his next sci-fi blockbuster, Oblivion. Of wifey Katie Holmes, he says: "Everything she does, she does with this beautiful creativity," says Tom. "She's funny and charming, and when she walks into the room, I just feel better.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | Daily News Staff Report
MUSIC Lady of Mystery Matching her haunted, tremulous voice to darkly poetic, dramatic songs of the country-rock persuasion, Megan Reilly casts an enchanting spell. There's some sonic kinship to Lucinda Williams and Emmylou Harris, though Reilly seems more forceful and spirit-shaking. It's an impression enhanced on her new album ("The Well") by the rocking/tremulous guitarists James Mastro and Lenny Kaye and, in her mellower mode, by a fingerpicking/singing John Wesley Harding, whom Reilly's opening for Friday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2011 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
WE'RE GOING to the country, grooving on jazz, bringing home the folk and buzz-bombing Athens, Ga., in this week's new releases roundup. COUNTY CAPERS: 85-years-young Tony Bennett has just scored his first-ever No. 1 Billboard album with "Duets II. " Now wouldn't it be swell if outlaw country icon Merle Haggard could enjoy a similar tribute/payday with his new set, "Working In Tennessee" (Vanguard, B+) ? The 74-year-old lung-cancer survivor sounds in growly good voice and keeps the tempo lively, with lotsa swinging country-jazz licks and even a side trip into frothy Caribbean waters on the Jimmy Buffet-styled "Down on the Houseboat.
NEWS
June 29, 2003 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
About a year ago, Karen Gross left her boyfriend's house, unsettled about the relationship, afraid she would be hurt if she allowed herself to fall in love. On the way home, she stopped in a parking lot, grabbed some notepaper and started writing. "Want to see the pages?" she said, rummaging through the piano bench at her family home. "I keep everything like a pack rat. " The neatly handwritten words connected by squiggles and arrows came together as "Break Up With Me, Baby," the third track on her debut CD, Navigating, which was released this month.
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