CollectionsLuge
IN THE NEWS

Luge

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
February 16, 1988 | By RICH HOFMANN, Daily News Sports Writer
He helped pave the road, helped build the shelter. It still isn't ready yet, far from it, but the foundation is believed to be solid. That's the important thing. And now, American luger Frank Masley, a team member over the last three Olympiads - from the dark ages of borrowed sleds to the present, a time of corporate funding and high-technology - is retired. He says he is without regrets, and has only one wish. "I'd like to take my last run over," he said. "I really would.
SPORTS
January 12, 1988 | By Jere Longman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Quick. For $200 and a trip to the bonus round, who was the U.S. flag bearer for the opening ceremonies at the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia? Phil Mahre, the skier? No. Scott Hamilton, the figure skater? No. If you're having trouble, don't worry. The U.S. Olympic Committee didn't do so hot, either. When the athletes voted at Sarajevo, the committee announced the winner as, uh, you know, "That luge guy. " "They had no idea who I was," said Frank Masley, now 27 and a mechanical engineering student at Drexel.
SPORTS
February 20, 1988 | By Bill Lyon, The Philadelphia Inquirer; By Ed Pope, Knight-Ridder news service
Steffi Martin Walter is a luger, which tells you right off she has no patience with the mundane. She won the gold medal in the 1984 Olympics and then retired to start a family. And, oh, yes, to go to law school on the side, just to make sure she had no free time. She has a son, Sebastian, who is 14 months old, and law school is going swimmingly. But even with all that, Walter, a 25-year-old East German, felt a void in her life. So last March she got the urge to luge again.
NEWS
March 11, 1999 | BY ERIN WARREN
From my unique (horizontal) position, I've learned that luge is like life: Keep your head up long enough to see where you're going; a thousandth of a second can change a lifetime; and, when things start to slide beyond your control, hold on for dear life and right your sled.Some of the lessons I have learned are applicable only to my special sport, yet most are life lessons I can impart to other young people. Since 1993, I have been involved with "Win at School," sponsored by Bell Atlantic.
SPORTS
February 7, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services
Drexel sophomore Robert Pipkins, of Staten Island, N.Y., joined the U.S. luge team yesterday when he won a two-day runoff against Wendel Suckow, of Marquette, Mich., and Tim Wiley, of Lexington, Mass. Wiley, winner of the Olympic luge trials in Lake Placid, N.Y., last month, was bumped from the team. Pipkins, 18, and Suckow joined medal hopeful Duncan Kennedy, of Lake Placid, on the squad. Pipkins, the only black luger competing on the international level, originally was a discretionary selection to the U.S. team after the Olympic trials, during which he set a track record at Lake Placid.
NEWS
April 12, 2002
IN RESPONSE to Sam Donnellon's Feb. 9 column, "More and more, borders are blurred. " The International Luge Federation requires that Olympic athletes race in three world cup events during the two seasons before the games. To race in a World Cup, an athlete must finish a qualifying run within 7 percent of the fastest time down that particular track. The Venezuelan athletes in question, Werner and Christopher Hoeger, raced in six and eight World Cups, respectively. It wasn't their Venezuelan passports that qualified them for the games, it was their performance.
SPORTS
January 13, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Bonny Warner slid to an American track record yesterday in Lake Placid, N.Y., and Frank Masley narrowly missed breaking his own mark in the second qualifying heat to determine the U.S. Olympic luge team. Warner, aided by perfect ice conditions as she careened down the Mount Van Hoevenberg track, shaved .02 off the American record set in 1983. Warner, 25, of Mount Baldy, Calif., held a commanding half-second lead over Erica Terwillegar, 24, of Lake Placid, after two of the three heats.
SPORTS
February 15, 2010 | By MARCUS HAYES, hayesm@phillynews.com
WHISTLER, British Columbia - The fast-starting Germans won, as they usually do. But the Canadians were dialed in to this deadly luge track. The Austrians were flying in practice. American veteran Tony Benshoof was hoping for an explosive finale. The death of a young Georgian luger Friday during a training run for the men's luge singles derailed those upset plans. "I wish they hadn't lowered the start," said Benshoof, a so-so starter but a fearless finisher who wound up eighth after yesterday's final two runs.
SPORTS
February 8, 2002 | By Bob Ford INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was considered the most memorable Olympic day in U.S. luge history. Of course, it also was the only memorable Olympic day in U.S. luge history. When they held the doubles competition in Nagano, Japan, four years ago, the German team took the gold medal. That wasn't a shock. But sliding in behind to grab the silver and bronze medals were two U.S. teams, Chris Thorpe and Gordy Sheer, and Mark Grimmette and Brian Martin. Before that competition, the United States had been 0-for-forever in Olympic luge events.
SPORTS
February 10, 1992 | By Timothy Dwyer, INQUIRER OLYMPICS BUREAU
Robert Pipkins was understandably nervous before his first race ever in Olympic luge competition, and it showed. The 18-year-old sophomore at Drexel University had a shaky start yesterday. He banged back and forth against the wall five times heading down the beginning of the 4,100-foot Olympic track. With each bump, he fell farther and farther behind and finished in 47.996 seconds, 32d among 34 racers. On his second run of the day, Pipkins showed more poise and finished 14th to move up to 26th place overall, clearly a disappointment.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 5, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every four years, as the Winter Olympics reenter the atmosphere, Americans are bombarded with quirky stories meant to interest them in obscure sports they'd ordinarily ignore. You know, the bobsledder who supports himself selling artichokes; the biathlete with three ears; the snowboarder raised by Hasidic hippies. But of all the odd story lines to surface in advance of this month's 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, few are as head-scratching as this one: The Veterans Stadium security guard who became USA Luge's CEO. Luge - sledding down mountainsides on one's back at 90 m.p.h.
SPORTS
January 16, 2012
Lindsey Vonn ended a five-week winless streak Sunday with an emphatic victory in a World Cup super-G that moved her into sole possession of third place on the career wins list. Vonn clocked 1 minute, 26.16 seconds down the Olympia delle Tofane course in Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy, finishing a massive 0.61 seconds in front of German rival Maria Hoefl-Riesch, with Tina Maze of Slovenia third. The win was the 47th in her career, moving her ahead of retired Austrian great Renate Goetschl.
SPORTS
April 12, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
The president of the International Luge Federation acknowledged that the sport's image has been damaged by Nodar Kumaritashvili's death at the Vancouver Olympics. Josef Fendt said yesterday that confidence must be rebuilt in the sport after the 21-year-old Georgian died hours before the start of the Winter Games 2 months ago. "You can never lean back and think you have done enough for safety," Fendt said at the conclusion of a 2-day session in St. Leonhard, Austria, in which experts completed the governing body's analysis of the Feb. 12 crash in Whistler.
SPORTS
March 17, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
The NFL chose two new co-chairmen - and a new name - for its committee on concussions. Dr. Hunt Batjer, of Northwestern University, and Dr. Richard Ellenbogen, of the University of Washington, will lead what now will be called the NFL head, neck and spine medical committee, the league said yesterday. The panel used to be called the NFL mild traumatic brain injury committee. Dr. Ira Casson and Dr. David Viano, who had led the league committee on concussions since 2007, resigned in November, less than a month after Casson and the NFL's concussion policy were criticized by Congress during a hearing at which commissioner Roger Goodell testified.
SPORTS
February 24, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
The designer of the crash-plagued Whistler Sliding Center track in British Columbia said there was never any pressure from Olympic organizers to make the circuit as fast as possible. "No, not at all, in no shape or form," veteran track designer Ugo Gurgel said in a telephone interview yesterday with the Associated Press in Berlin. Georgian luger Nodar Kumaritashvili was killed when his sled flew off the track at speeds nearing 90 mph during a training run just hours before the Olympic flame was lit. After an investigation by local authorities, officials of the Vancouver Organizing Committee and International Luge Federation blamed the fatal crash on human error.
SPORTS
February 21, 2010 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
VANCOUVER - It happened Wednesday. The 2010 Winter Olympics lit up like a slot machine and started spitting out medals for the United States. Lindsey Vonn, Shani Davis, and Shaun White won gold medals as the U.S. team won a record six total medals in a single day. The next day, Evan Lysacek took the first men's figure-skating gold for the U.S. team in a generation. Just like that, the brash, loud neighbors to the south had officially crashed Canada's long-planned coming-out party.
NEWS
February 17, 2010
THE LOSS of a Georgian luge Olympian and two disastrous potholes at the NASCAR Daytona 500 raise the question as to whether professional sports has adopted the current business philosophy of cutting corners without regard to athletes and spectators alike. Professional sports can't be run like government, with its lobbying, kickbacks and tunnel vision politics. Those in charge are treating these gifted competitors like common citizens dealing with blatant budget cutbacks. Professional sports and the government must take care of the athletes and the citizens, not special interests.
SPORTS
February 16, 2010
LOOKS AS IF NBC must have taken some flak for reshowing and reshowing and reshowing the fatal crash of Georgian luge athlete Nodar Kumaritashvili. How else would you explain a cease-and-desist order from NBC News president Steve Capus that forbids the footage to be aired by NBC or MSNBC without his permission? TVNewser reported that an NBC spokesperson issued the following statement: "NBC News handled the video of the luge accident with the utmost sensitivity. As we have done in the past, we felt the story had reached a point where it was no longer necessary to show the video when reporting on this tragic story.
SPORTS
February 15, 2010 | By MARCUS HAYES, hayesm@phillynews.com
WHISTLER, British Columbia - The fast-starting Germans won, as they usually do. But the Canadians were dialed in to this deadly luge track. The Austrians were flying in practice. American veteran Tony Benshoof was hoping for an explosive finale. The death of a young Georgian luger Friday during a training run for the men's luge singles derailed those upset plans. "I wish they hadn't lowered the start," said Benshoof, a so-so starter but a fearless finisher who wound up eighth after yesterday's final two runs.
SPORTS
February 14, 2010 | By Phil Sheridan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Slower, tougher, safer. In the aftermath of the shocking death of an athlete, that was the Olympic motto for the first day of luge competition here. Early in the morning, luge federation president Josef Fendt announced that the start of the men's competition would be moved to the lower starting point normally used by the women. The change, which removed three turns and about 176 meters from the original course, was designed to lower speeds by a few miles per hour. And it did. Germany's Felix Loch hit 91.6 m.p.h.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|