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Luggage

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NEWS
June 14, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
With the deregulation of the airline industry and the proliferation of cheap fares, more people than ever before are flying. But more people means more luggage, and more luggage means more lost luggage. Most misplaced baggage just doesn't get to the plane in time and usually catches up with its perturbed owners within a few hours. Nevertheless, 2 percent of the owners of lost bags are not so lucky. Following are tips for ensuring that your luggage doesn't become part of these statistics: Passengers should check the claim ticket when the luggage is checked to make sure that a bag meant for Columbus, Ohio, has not been ticketed to Colombia, South America.
LIVING
April 20, 1986 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
Louis Vuitton luggage, like the classic Packard car, is one of those things that people collect, restore and occasionally use. Actress Ruth Gordon and her husband, writer-director Garson Kanin, owned 20 pieces of Vuitton luggage. They had hat boxes, steamer trunks, a shirt trunk, a book trunk, two garment bags, a cosmetic case and a train case - every piece built to Kanin's specifications. After Gordon died last August at the age of 88, the trunks and cases - filled with her clothes, costumes and memorabilia - were sent to William Doyle Galleries in New York for sale, and they brought good prices.
NEWS
October 20, 2009 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
A South Jersey man who screened luggage at Philadelphia International Airport pleaded guilty in federal court yesterday to stealing four laptop computers and a PlayStation game system from the luggage of airline passengers. Troy Davis, 36, of Willingboro, faces zero to six months behind bars when he is sentenced in January. Authorities said that Davis had been assigned by the Transportation Security Administration to screen checked luggage at Terminal A. The government's plea memorandum said that Davis admitted taking the items to federal agents on March 31. Investigators later determined that the stolen goods belonged to two passengers, one bound for Miami and the other to Puerto Rico on March 31. Davis' thefts had been observed by a baggage handler for American Airlines, the court document said.
NEWS
October 12, 2006
US Airways officials are pledging to fix the airline's horrendous performance in handling luggage at Philadelphia International Airport. They should attack the problem as if it's their last chance to get it right. As The Inquirer documented on Sunday, US Airways' baggage system in Philadelphia is by far the worst in the airline's nationwide operation. The hub in Philadelphia loses passengers' bags four times more often than the airline's overall rate for lost luggage - which is no great shakes either.
LIVING
February 23, 1986 | By Gary Haynes, Inquirer Graphic Arts Director
They seem to be in all the magazines - glitzy camera ads, proclaiming that this or that prize-winning photograph was made with a particular brand of equipment. The advertisements feed the tendency of some photographers, especially young ones who admire the work of established professional photographers, to dwell on equipment over talent or technique. Perhaps the most egregious example of this came at a slide show given by a National Geographic photographer. The photographer, who specializes in picturing wilderness areas, had just wound up his talk before a rapt audience; the lights came up, and he asked for questions.
SPORTS
January 2, 1996 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Maybe somebody decided the 76ers were carrying too much excess baggage. Whatever, coach John Lucas arrived for tonight's game against the Los Angeles Lakers missing a piece of luggage. The bag disappeared from the Sixers' hotel headquarters in Denver, where they dropped a 108-100 decision to the Denver Nuggets Saturday night. Lucas said he was missing six designer suits, a number of shirts, shoes and various accessories. "I wore the same suit in Denver that I wore the night before in Sacramento.
TRAVEL
January 8, 2012 | By Christopher Elliott, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES
Philip Bramson's iPod vanished from his checked luggage on a flight to Mexico, and recovering it seemed impossible. "It was hidden in my luggage, so it could only have been seen through the X-ray or a pretty thorough search," he says. "The only place this could have happened is during the luggage handling in JFK. There was not enough time in Mexico between when we landed and I was given my luggage. " It's an awful feeling when you open your suitcase after a long flight and notice something is missing.
NEWS
December 2, 2007 | By Sue Syrnick, Inquirer graphic designer
Personally, I've always wanted my name at the top - of the card, that is. Perfect gifts, these personalized correspondence cards and envelopes with a liner that matches the pretty faux-lizard box it all comes in, and it can be ready in plenty of time for gift-giving. By Crane & Co., the 20 cards with envelopes can be ordered up until Dec. 12 for $39. They also come in pink, navy, brown, green, black, royal blue, yellow, light pink and light blue. (1) Here's a pretty stocking- stuffer for the child whose forthcoming spring semester includes studying abroad in a romantic place (as if studying was really happening)
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
Two men were arrested after being tracked through a trail of metal they left behind while trying to steal scrap from Highland High School, police say. Officers were called to the school in Gloucester Township, Camden County, at 8 a.m. today by school workers. The workers, police say, spied men trying to take metal pieces kept under the stadium bleachers and load the scrap into carry-on luggage. The men were gone by the time officers arrived. However, police found a trail of metal leading to a fence that separates school grounds from the Highland Park development.
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | Associated Press
TOLEDO, Ohio - An Ohio man was accused of zipping six bulldog-mix puppies into a suitcase and leaving it next to a trash bin after his contact information was found on the luggage tag, authorities said Wednesday. A Toledo Area Humane Society officer filed two misdemeanor charges of abandoning animals against Howard Davis, 53, of Toledo, this week. He was not arrested, and could not be found for comment Wednesday, but is scheduled to appear in Toledo Municipal Court on Friday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
July 18, 2016
Because we are permanent nomads, we frequently live out of our suitcases. Although we usually stay in destinations long enough to unpack, continuous transit from place to place warrants the right luggage - and the right size of those bags. People are often surprised by how little we take with us: For the last five years, we've each used just one 21-inch wheeled suitcase, along with a computer bag. We use these bags whether we're traveling for a week, a month, or a year. Our strategy is to pack a week's worth of clothing, then do laundry when we're gone for a longer period.
TRAVEL
July 10, 2016
Always looking for a better way to efficiently organize the contents of our luggage, we've used nylon cubes and lift-out fabric shelves. Now, the folks at Pack Gear have combined the two concepts to create an organizer system especially designed and sized for carry-on bags and backpacks. The Carry-On Traveler is a four-tier nylon shelf system, with see-through mesh zippered covers sealing in the three front-facing tiers. The uppermost tier opens from the top via an opaque zippered cover.
TRAVEL
May 23, 2016
Q: I have been attempting to get reimbursed for out­of­pocket expenses from Alitalia, and I'm hoping you can help. The problem started when Alitalia checked me in as the wrong passenger on a flight from Miami to Rome to Tel Aviv. There was another E. Weiner on the flight. I discovered the problem while waiting to board the flight in Miami. My ticket was supposed to be from Miami to Tel Aviv via Rome. My boarding pass was only to Rome. While the staff scrambled to correct the problem ticket and boarding pass, they said they would board the plane and find my bags.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
THE FIRST TIME, she walked around for 45 minutes to work up the nerve to do it. As someone who shuns the spotlight, approaching a homeless person with an offer of food, a handout, was outside her comfort zone. "I thought people would be resentful," Sharon Suleta says. The first time was nine weeks ago this very night, in the Suburban Station underground concourse. Dragging a food-filled luggage cart behind her, with a socks-stuffed canvas bag over her arm, she approached those who appeared to be homeless and asked, "Would you like a dinner bag?"
BUSINESS
February 6, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
So, where does your checked bag go after you drop it at the airline ticket counter? Like many passengers, bags may have a quarter-mile journey from the ticketing lobby to the aircraft. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Wednesday offered a rare glimpse behind the scenes at how baggage is screened at Philadelphia International Airport, where an in-line system of conveyor belts and explosive-detection machines can process up to 1,000 bags an hour. "Some people think the TSA opens and physically screens every single bag," said TSA spokesman Michael McCarthy.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Manager Monica Best stood at her usual station, behind the glass counter at Robinson Luggage, near tears. On the windows at Broad and Walnut, "Going Out of Business" signs had just been posted like a rude slap. Customers flooded into the store, many incredulous, some equally distraught. One woman asked, "You can't be going out of business?" But, yes, after 86 years and one change in family ownership, Robinson will close its last location when all inventory is sold, most likely in December.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robinson Luggage, a retailing fixture in Center City since its founding in 1927, is going out of business. Nancy Center, vice president of the company, said the store at Broad and Walnut Streets could no longer compete with big-box stores such as Walmart and online giant Amazon.com. At its peak, Robinson had seven stores in the Philadelphia region. In 2007, the company - bolstered by its own online operation - reported $22 million in revenue. Now it is down to six employees at Broad and Walnut and nine in management and the online business, said Center, who lives in Montgomery County.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
In their search for the perfectly rugged duffel - as in no wheels at the airport, dude - two twentysomethings took a stab two years ago at designing men's luggage. Today Merion natives Adam Blitzer and Alex Realmuto sit at the helm of Blue Claw Co., a just-for-guys line of travel bags and everyday carryalls that include waxed canvas briefcases, iPad sleeves, and duffels. Man-purses be damned. But more important than introducing millennials to the prestige that comes from carrying worn leather, the businessmen hope to do their part to jump-start accessories manufacturing in the United States - especially when it comes to leather goods.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: Is it unreasonable to ask a spouse to drive you to an airport two hours away for a three-hour flight? I would normally drive myself and leave my car there, but I'll have our toddler with me, and dealing with parking shuttles and luggage and a kid with unpredictable moods seems like an awful lot to take on by myself. I'm going to this airport instead of a closer one because it would save a lot on airfare and we can get a nonstop flight.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
Two men were arrested after being tracked through a trail of metal they left behind while trying to steal scrap from Highland High School, police say. Officers were called to the school in Gloucester Township, Camden County, at 8 a.m. today by school workers. The workers, police say, spied men trying to take metal pieces kept under the stadium bleachers and load the scrap into carry-on luggage. The men were gone by the time officers arrived. However, police found a trail of metal leading to a fence that separates school grounds from the Highland Park development.
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