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FOOD
September 22, 2011 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Despite Jamie Oliver's best intentions, the obstacles to making healthy homemade school lunches are still daunting: busy working parents, limited food budgets, picky kids, the temptations of processed foods at every turn. Yet the solution, for some lunch-packing parents, might be as simple as finding the right container: trading in the American brown bag for the Japanese bento box. With a long history in Japan and variations in Korea, India, and the Philippines, the multi-compartment bento box is not new, but in recent years it has gained popularity as a lunch box among health-conscious parents.
SPORTS
April 13, 2011
WASHINGTON - During his day off in Washington, Charlie Manuel ate lunch and dinner with his daughter, Julie, who works in the city. She was able to take an extra hour for lunch, but only because of her dad's stature. "Her boss said it was OK as long as I get him World Series tickets," Manuel said. How many times do you think Manuel has been asked to do that favor? - Matt Gelb
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
Almost every working day, a secretary for Montgomery County's two Republican commissioners calls a restaurant near the Norristown courthouse to ask about the daily luncheon specials. Orders are placed, a box filled with lunches is delivered, and four high- ranking county officials share a quiet lunch behind closed doors. Taxpayers pick up the tab. Last year, the lunch bills totaled $5,587, according to county records released yesterday by Democratic minority Commissioner Rita C. Banning.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Eric Mustin
If you want to get ahead in corporate America, you have to answer this question correctly: Do you eat lunch, or do you crush lunch? What do I mean by crush , you ask? I'm not referring to physical flattening, as of a cardboard box. I'm talking about complete domination - the way an NBA franchise might crush a girls' junior varsity squad. Crushing lunch is one of the most important skills in the corporate workplace. If you can high-five, fist-pump, and lunch-crush, you are going to do big things in this world.
NEWS
March 29, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Crunch. Munch. Slurp. Crunch. Munch. Slurp. What's that? It's the guy at the next desk having lunch. The number of folks who have taken to dining al desko is causing some new problems in the workplace. A co-worker who doesn't wipe up her spilled soup in the microwave is as irritating as the guy who never replaces the paper in the copy machine. And the smell of frozen flounder florentine is as noxious to some as now- banned cigarette smoke used to be to many.
NEWS
July 5, 2002 | By MARYBETH T. HAGAN
A REPRESENTATIVE of the city slipped a little surprise under the windshield wiper of my car when it was parked in the shadow of the Convention Center on 13th Street near Arch the other day. I received my first parking ticket. I had carefully weighed my decision to back into that spot in a one-hour parking zone. After the first quarter clicked and the little arrow on the meter granted me 15 minutes, I glanced at the parking lot next to me. Should I stay at the metered spot and have to interrupt lunch with my friend Kia to dash back to feed the hungry machine, I wondered?
NEWS
September 29, 2002 | By Heather Hewett FOR THE INQUIRER
I peered at the itinerary clipped onto my handlebars and read the name: "Abbaye de Pontleroy. " In front of us, the sign read "Ferm?. " "Strike two," my husband said, getting back onto his bike. We had left Montrichard that morning, planning to tour some of the Loire Valley's lesser-known castles. It was late September, after the high season - still good for biking but not, apparently, for smaller tourist destinations. First a ch?teau and now the abbey: both closed. To make matters worse, after four hours of cycling, we still hadn't found lunch.
SPORTS
April 25, 2004 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bensalem's relay team thought it had time. The four boys who made up the first team to represent the school in a Penn Relays Championship of America 4x100 race had the best of intentions when they left Franklin Field for a lunch of fruit salad, pizza and baked ziti - carbohydrates and hydration - just a few blocks away. The relays were running about a half hour behind schedule anyway. When they were done warming up and pinning bibs to their blue spandex tops, they reached the race area just in time to hear the gun go off and see their competitors race without them.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Brian Brennan, 17, is a straight-A student at Springfield High School, where his schedule includes five advanced-placement courses as well as orchestra and choir. The grueling routine requires the senior to attend classes from 7:44 a.m. through 2:25 p.m. without a break, not even a lunch period. It's a high-pressure pace that he willingly accepts, Brennan said, to be among the school's academic elite and to be a freshman in the University of Pennsylvania's Class of 1995. "I see lunch as a waste.
FOOD
September 17, 1995 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
A review partner and I enjoyed breakfast and lunch at the Down Home Diner recently. That might not seem unusual except that we ate both meals without moving an inch from our booth. Confused? Hang in there. I'll try to explain. The diner occupies a corner of the recently renovated Reading Terminal Market. We arrived at 11:30 a.m. on a Tuesday, hoping to beat the market's usual noonday crowd. We were ready - read hungry here - for lunch. Our server, a waif with a wistful smile, handed us a plastic-covered menu with lunch on one side, breakfast on the other.
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NEWS
July 9, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
AT FIRST, Philadelphia teacher LeShawna Coleman believed she'd be meeting with Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to discuss education issues. Late last week, she was informed that things had changed: Coleman would be having a luncheon meeting with President Obama instead. Coleman, who as a teacher coach with the district works with teachers in classrooms, was one of four educators to have an "honest, open conversation" with Obama in the White House. Duncan was also present. "It's a once-in-a-lifetime experience," Coleman said.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia teacher LeShawna Coleman had some interesting lunch company Wednesday: President Obama. Coleman, a 13-year Philadelphia School District veteran, teacher coach, and English as a Second Language teacher, had expected to travel to Washington for a U.S. Department of Education event about teacher equity. (The Education Department introduced a program Monday to get more strong teachers in the nation's poorest schools.) But last week, she learned she was one of four teachers nationwide chosen to lunch with the president and Education Secretary Arne Duncan.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying stricter federal nutrition guidelines are too much to swallow, the Unionville-Chadds Ford School District has decided to remove its 1,300 high school students from the program that is to go into effect next school year. In deciding last week that the students would not join the 31 million across the country who get free or reduced-price lunches through the National School Lunch Program, the district said its own food policies were healthy enough for its high schoolers. The district's middle school and four elementary schools will still participate.
NEWS
June 18, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
First, the nation agreed that its children are too heavy and unhealthy. Then, the federal government - Democrats and Republicans together channeling scientific research - hammered out ideas to reduce fat, calories, and salt in school meals. Now, that harmonious effort is splintering as a food fight embroiling Congress, health professionals, the White House, and even cafeteria workers threatens to rage through the summer and disrupt lunch period come September. In an odd twist, the School Nutrition Association (SNA)
FOOD
February 21, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students in Penny Greenberg's culinary-arts classes have a term for the hoagies, pizza, and chicken nuggets served in the cafeteria. "They call it 'freebie food,' " said Greenberg, who teaches at Dobbins Career and Technical Education High School. Almost all of its students are eligible for free lunches - and although some think the food is OK, others apparently feel they're getting what they've paid for. In the next month or so, though, the menu at Dobbins will get a special addition: Louisiana-style spicy chicken with collard greens and served with red beans and rice.
NEWS
February 1, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey has shown marked increases in getting low-income children to eat breakfast in school, while Pennsylvania has demonstrated slow improvement in serving the meals. That's the word from the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC), which released its School Breakfast Scorecard this month. Based in Washington, FRAC is the leading antihunger advocacy group in America. Throughout the country, school-breakfast participation by low-income students is calculated by measuring the number of children eating breakfast compared with those eating lunch.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
JOSEPH LIGAMBI, the 74-year-old reputed Philadelphia mob boss, hasn't been convicted of a crime, but he's been locked up at the Federal Detention Center since May 2011, held without bail while awaiting trial on a massive racketeering indictment. Yesterday, after a 13-year investigation and two lengthy trials, the government threw in the towel, filing a one-sentence motion to drop all charges. Both juries had failed to convict Ligambi of racketeering conspiracy, gambling, loan-sharking, theft of medical benefits or obstruction of justice.
FOOD
November 21, 2013
The soup days are upon us, and few bowls satisfy the craving quite like hearty chicken soup. Le Pain Quotidien delivers an appealing update to the ancient French standard called pot-au-feu, a wintery one-pot stew of root veggies, broth, and meat. True to the Belgian bread chain's sleek organic aesthetic, this rendition is neat and tidy rather than rustic. But I still love all the veggies that fill this bowl, from turnips and leeks to garbanzo beans, carrots, and cauliflower, alongside the tender chunks of chicken seasoned with herbes de Provence.
FOOD
September 6, 2013 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
School lunch . The words evoke mental images of water-bloated frozen pizza, sugary fruit-flavored beverages, irradiated meat slabs, and plastic-wrapped lunch "kits. " For most parents, the prospect is downright horrifying, and perhaps especially so when said parents are culinary professionals. It's not just the gastronomic atrocities involved but the industrial-grade ingredients that give chefs pause. "When I think of my son eating lunch at school, I have a lot of concerns about where the food comes from and who's making it," says Joe Cicala of Le Virtu in South Philly.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
IT'S A parental terror about as universal as stepping on a Lego barefoot: packing kids' lunches for school and day care. This month's Top Cook, Anita Garimella Andrews, has faced and conquered it. She had to. Because of the family's schedule, she packs three meals a day and two snacks for her 16-month-old daughter, Sanaa. "I think moms who have children who go to day care have similar things to think about as those of school-aged children," said Andrews. "What can I pack that's easy to do, healthful, will go over well and minimize mess?"
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