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Lunch

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FOOD
September 22, 2011 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Despite Jamie Oliver's best intentions, the obstacles to making healthy homemade school lunches are still daunting: busy working parents, limited food budgets, picky kids, the temptations of processed foods at every turn. Yet the solution, for some lunch-packing parents, might be as simple as finding the right container: trading in the American brown bag for the Japanese bento box. With a long history in Japan and variations in Korea, India, and the Philippines, the multi-compartment bento box is not new, but in recent years it has gained popularity as a lunch box among health-conscious parents.
SPORTS
April 13, 2011
WASHINGTON - During his day off in Washington, Charlie Manuel ate lunch and dinner with his daughter, Julie, who works in the city. She was able to take an extra hour for lunch, but only because of her dad's stature. "Her boss said it was OK as long as I get him World Series tickets," Manuel said. How many times do you think Manuel has been asked to do that favor? - Matt Gelb
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
Almost every working day, a secretary for Montgomery County's two Republican commissioners calls a restaurant near the Norristown courthouse to ask about the daily luncheon specials. Orders are placed, a box filled with lunches is delivered, and four high- ranking county officials share a quiet lunch behind closed doors. Taxpayers pick up the tab. Last year, the lunch bills totaled $5,587, according to county records released yesterday by Democratic minority Commissioner Rita C. Banning.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Eric Mustin
If you want to get ahead in corporate America, you have to answer this question correctly: Do you eat lunch, or do you crush lunch? What do I mean by crush , you ask? I'm not referring to physical flattening, as of a cardboard box. I'm talking about complete domination - the way an NBA franchise might crush a girls' junior varsity squad. Crushing lunch is one of the most important skills in the corporate workplace. If you can high-five, fist-pump, and lunch-crush, you are going to do big things in this world.
NEWS
March 29, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Crunch. Munch. Slurp. Crunch. Munch. Slurp. What's that? It's the guy at the next desk having lunch. The number of folks who have taken to dining al desko is causing some new problems in the workplace. A co-worker who doesn't wipe up her spilled soup in the microwave is as irritating as the guy who never replaces the paper in the copy machine. And the smell of frozen flounder florentine is as noxious to some as now- banned cigarette smoke used to be to many.
NEWS
July 5, 2002 | By MARYBETH T. HAGAN
A REPRESENTATIVE of the city slipped a little surprise under the windshield wiper of my car when it was parked in the shadow of the Convention Center on 13th Street near Arch the other day. I received my first parking ticket. I had carefully weighed my decision to back into that spot in a one-hour parking zone. After the first quarter clicked and the little arrow on the meter granted me 15 minutes, I glanced at the parking lot next to me. Should I stay at the metered spot and have to interrupt lunch with my friend Kia to dash back to feed the hungry machine, I wondered?
NEWS
September 29, 2002 | By Heather Hewett FOR THE INQUIRER
I peered at the itinerary clipped onto my handlebars and read the name: "Abbaye de Pontleroy. " In front of us, the sign read "Ferm?. " "Strike two," my husband said, getting back onto his bike. We had left Montrichard that morning, planning to tour some of the Loire Valley's lesser-known castles. It was late September, after the high season - still good for biking but not, apparently, for smaller tourist destinations. First a ch?teau and now the abbey: both closed. To make matters worse, after four hours of cycling, we still hadn't found lunch.
SPORTS
April 25, 2004 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bensalem's relay team thought it had time. The four boys who made up the first team to represent the school in a Penn Relays Championship of America 4x100 race had the best of intentions when they left Franklin Field for a lunch of fruit salad, pizza and baked ziti - carbohydrates and hydration - just a few blocks away. The relays were running about a half hour behind schedule anyway. When they were done warming up and pinning bibs to their blue spandex tops, they reached the race area just in time to hear the gun go off and see their competitors race without them.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Brian Brennan, 17, is a straight-A student at Springfield High School, where his schedule includes five advanced-placement courses as well as orchestra and choir. The grueling routine requires the senior to attend classes from 7:44 a.m. through 2:25 p.m. without a break, not even a lunch period. It's a high-pressure pace that he willingly accepts, Brennan said, to be among the school's academic elite and to be a freshman in the University of Pennsylvania's Class of 1995. "I see lunch as a waste.
FOOD
September 17, 1995 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
A review partner and I enjoyed breakfast and lunch at the Down Home Diner recently. That might not seem unusual except that we ate both meals without moving an inch from our booth. Confused? Hang in there. I'll try to explain. The diner occupies a corner of the recently renovated Reading Terminal Market. We arrived at 11:30 a.m. on a Tuesday, hoping to beat the market's usual noonday crowd. We were ready - read hungry here - for lunch. Our server, a waif with a wistful smile, handed us a plastic-covered menu with lunch on one side, breakfast on the other.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
January 1, 2016 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Food Critic
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of Dec. 29, 2015: Reader: Could you suggest a spot for lunch where out-of-town friends can experience our exciting restaurant scene, sip good wine, talk and linger? (Walking distance or short ride from the Palomar would be ideal.) They love fresh seafood. Craig LaBan: Well, there are lots of good lunch options - including some with good wine - within walking distance of the Palomar: the Oyster House (serious local flavor, great seafood and wines to match)
NEWS
December 12, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Trump, the Republican front-runner for president, once called the Plaza Hotel in New York City "the ultimate trophy. " That was when he owned it, from 1988 to 1995. The Pennsylvania Republican Party might have seen Trump, who draws large crowds at rallies, as a trophy "headline speaker" for Friday's fund-raising luncheon, held each year at the Plaza during Pennsylvania Society events. The question now: Has Trump tarnished his trophy status with a series of escalatingly provocative comments, culminating in a call to ban Muslims from entering the country?
NEWS
December 2, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
Today is being marketed as a global day of giving. Coffee drinkers and donors to a local nonprofit can enter to win a bike ride or a lunch with the mayor and his wife. Here's how it works: Gearing Up  is a local nonprofit that provides bikes for women in transition from addiction, abuse and incarceration, and it's announced a partnership with Square One Coffee (249 S. 13th St.), in Midtown Village, for what's being designated as #GivingTuesday. According to a news release, the coffee shop will give 5 percent of all sales earned today to Gearing Up, and for one day only, every donation made at Square One Coffee or through the Gearing Up website will be matched dollar for dollar, up to $10,000.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Linda Jeffers looked over the spring roll she ordered. "I don't see any bugs," she said drily to two friends as she bit into her appetizer. "Of course, we wouldn't know; they could be crunchy. " And with that joke, the ice was broken, and the three lunch partners seemed delighted to be back at a favorite Main Line haunt, Yangming Restaurant, which opened Wednesday for the first time since it was shut down for health violations two months ago. The three were among about 45 customers who showed up for lunch after the restaurant opened at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday.
FOOD
September 25, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of Tuesday, Sept. 22. Reader: Since the weather is starting to get colder in the morning, where is your go-to place for a great cup of joe? Craig LaBan: So many right now. I tend to hover between Menagerie (Old City), Rival Bros. (Fitler Square), and Talula's Daily (Washington Square), with visits to Bodhi (10th Street), Toast (12th Street), Square One (13th Street); and sometimes the new Passero's (800 block of Chestnut Street)
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
At Camden's most unusual new restaurant, there's more than hearty fare on the menu. Five raised beds of veggies are flourishing on the roof; a cozy "garden terrace" offers an outdoor space for catered events; and some employees are ex-cons who have turned their lives around. Welcome to the CK Cafe, where sales of sandwiches, salads, and platters named for Pyne Poynt, Parkside, Fairview, and other sections of the city help feed the needy folks who live there. "We're trying to celebrate where we're at," says Karen Talarico, executive director of Cathedral Kitchen, the cafe's nonprofit parent.
TRAVEL
June 8, 2015 | By Shirley Phillips, For The Inquirer
When you travel to a foreign country, you see amazing sights and beautiful scenery. Sometimes, however, the most amazing and beautiful thing you experience is the people. Most of us in our lifetimes have done something incredibly stupid - something you look back on and think, "How could I possibly have done that?" My friend and I are seasoned travelers. On our trip to Spain, the 12th European country we've visited, we had no reason to believe everything would not be as wonderful as before.
SPORTS
May 30, 2015 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
GALLOWAY, N.J. - The ShopRite LPGA Classic, which begins Friday, is being held for the 27th time. Juli Inkster won the first one and the third one, in 1986 and 1988, when it was known as the Atlantic City Classic, and is here preparing once again less than a month shy of her 55th birthday. She has other responsibilities these days, both as the 2015 captain of the U.S. Solheim Cup team, and as a television commentator for Fox, which will televise the U.S. Open and other USGA national championships this year.
NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Theresa Shank, For The Inquirer
The unofficial start of summer - Memorial Day - is this weekend, and because many of us have been hibernating all winter, it's time to start a lifestyle change to lose weight and feel your absolute best. To initiate behavior change for quick weight loss, I always encourage my clients to use the three P's: Plan, Purchase, and Prep. Plan : Choose the day most convenient for you and make it your "plan" day. That will be your day to write out what you will eat for breakfast, lunch, and dinner for the week.
NEWS
November 20, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Mayor and Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell will host a meet-and-greet for Democratic mayoral candidate Ken Trujillo on Wednesday, a day already bursting with events for two other unannounced candidates. Trujillo will get a chance to make his pitch to some of Philadelphia's biggest political donors at noon at the Pyramid Club in Center City. That will be the same time that former District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham will formally announce her candidacy, and a few hours before State Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams is to announce his. The invitation-only lunch is described as "a 'get-to-know-you' gathering," not a fund-raiser.
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