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FOOD
September 22, 2011 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Despite Jamie Oliver's best intentions, the obstacles to making healthy homemade school lunches are still daunting: busy working parents, limited food budgets, picky kids, the temptations of processed foods at every turn. Yet the solution, for some lunch-packing parents, might be as simple as finding the right container: trading in the American brown bag for the Japanese bento box. With a long history in Japan and variations in Korea, India, and the Philippines, the multi-compartment bento box is not new, but in recent years it has gained popularity as a lunch box among health-conscious parents.
SPORTS
April 13, 2011
WASHINGTON - During his day off in Washington, Charlie Manuel ate lunch and dinner with his daughter, Julie, who works in the city. She was able to take an extra hour for lunch, but only because of her dad's stature. "Her boss said it was OK as long as I get him World Series tickets," Manuel said. How many times do you think Manuel has been asked to do that favor? - Matt Gelb
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Eric Mustin
If you want to get ahead in corporate America, you have to answer this question correctly: Do you eat lunch, or do you crush lunch? What do I mean by crush , you ask? I'm not referring to physical flattening, as of a cardboard box. I'm talking about complete domination - the way an NBA franchise might crush a girls' junior varsity squad. Crushing lunch is one of the most important skills in the corporate workplace. If you can high-five, fist-pump, and lunch-crush, you are going to do big things in this world.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
Almost every working day, a secretary for Montgomery County's two Republican commissioners calls a restaurant near the Norristown courthouse to ask about the daily luncheon specials. Orders are placed, a box filled with lunches is delivered, and four high- ranking county officials share a quiet lunch behind closed doors. Taxpayers pick up the tab. Last year, the lunch bills totaled $5,587, according to county records released yesterday by Democratic minority Commissioner Rita C. Banning.
NEWS
March 29, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Crunch. Munch. Slurp. Crunch. Munch. Slurp. What's that? It's the guy at the next desk having lunch. The number of folks who have taken to dining al desko is causing some new problems in the workplace. A co-worker who doesn't wipe up her spilled soup in the microwave is as irritating as the guy who never replaces the paper in the copy machine. And the smell of frozen flounder florentine is as noxious to some as now- banned cigarette smoke used to be to many.
NEWS
July 5, 2002 | By MARYBETH T. HAGAN
A REPRESENTATIVE of the city slipped a little surprise under the windshield wiper of my car when it was parked in the shadow of the Convention Center on 13th Street near Arch the other day. I received my first parking ticket. I had carefully weighed my decision to back into that spot in a one-hour parking zone. After the first quarter clicked and the little arrow on the meter granted me 15 minutes, I glanced at the parking lot next to me. Should I stay at the metered spot and have to interrupt lunch with my friend Kia to dash back to feed the hungry machine, I wondered?
NEWS
September 29, 2002 | By Heather Hewett FOR THE INQUIRER
I peered at the itinerary clipped onto my handlebars and read the name: "Abbaye de Pontleroy. " In front of us, the sign read "Ferm?. " "Strike two," my husband said, getting back onto his bike. We had left Montrichard that morning, planning to tour some of the Loire Valley's lesser-known castles. It was late September, after the high season - still good for biking but not, apparently, for smaller tourist destinations. First a ch?teau and now the abbey: both closed. To make matters worse, after four hours of cycling, we still hadn't found lunch.
SPORTS
April 25, 2004 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bensalem's relay team thought it had time. The four boys who made up the first team to represent the school in a Penn Relays Championship of America 4x100 race had the best of intentions when they left Franklin Field for a lunch of fruit salad, pizza and baked ziti - carbohydrates and hydration - just a few blocks away. The relays were running about a half hour behind schedule anyway. When they were done warming up and pinning bibs to their blue spandex tops, they reached the race area just in time to hear the gun go off and see their competitors race without them.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Brian Brennan, 17, is a straight-A student at Springfield High School, where his schedule includes five advanced-placement courses as well as orchestra and choir. The grueling routine requires the senior to attend classes from 7:44 a.m. through 2:25 p.m. without a break, not even a lunch period. It's a high-pressure pace that he willingly accepts, Brennan said, to be among the school's academic elite and to be a freshman in the University of Pennsylvania's Class of 1995. "I see lunch as a waste.
FOOD
September 17, 1995 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
A review partner and I enjoyed breakfast and lunch at the Down Home Diner recently. That might not seem unusual except that we ate both meals without moving an inch from our booth. Confused? Hang in there. I'll try to explain. The diner occupies a corner of the recently renovated Reading Terminal Market. We arrived at 11:30 a.m. on a Tuesday, hoping to beat the market's usual noonday crowd. We were ready - read hungry here - for lunch. Our server, a waif with a wistful smile, handed us a plastic-covered menu with lunch on one side, breakfast on the other.
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NEWS
November 20, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Mayor and Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell will host a meet-and-greet for Democratic mayoral candidate Ken Trujillo on Wednesday, a day already bursting with events for two other unannounced candidates. Trujillo will get a chance to make his pitch to some of Philadelphia's biggest political donors at noon at the Pyramid Club in Center City. That will be the same time that former District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham will formally announce her candidacy, and a few hours before State Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams is to announce his. The invitation-only lunch is described as "a 'get-to-know-you' gathering," not a fund-raiser.
NEWS
September 5, 2014
BANANA DOG BITES These sweet, sushi-style snacks pack a protein punch. Use whole-wheat tortillas for extra fiber. 2 tortillas (any variety will work) 1/4 cup peanut butter, or almond or sunflower butter 2 bananas, peeled Place one tortilla on a flat surface and spread 2 tablespoons of peanut butter on the tortilla to coat it evenly. (Note: If your tortillas are stiff, you can put them in the microwave between 2 pieces of moist paper towel and heat for 15 to 20 seconds to soften.)
NEWS
September 5, 2014
HOW DO you get headstrong teenagers to eat healthier, plant-based lunches? Slowly. "Getting kids to eat food they're not used to requires a lot of feet on the ground," said Amie Hamlin, who should know: Her New York Coalition for Healthy School Food has for years mobilized changes in school districts from Ithaca to New York City. She also was behind one public school's move to all-vegetarian lunches. With students now returning to school, to the ideological battleground that is the school cafeteria, different "veg" efforts in different cities are coming to fruition.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY SARAH GISH, The Kansas City Star
EVERY NIGHT before bed, Sue Patterson packs her 10-year-old daughter, Emmy, a lunch that resembles a work of art. Picture a heart-shaped roast-beef sandwich nestled into a Hello Kitty container, with colorful cups of dried fruit, olives, organic cheese and yogurt-covered pretzels. Or a pink Japanese-style bento box with a California sushi roll, shelled edamame, red grapes and kiwis cut into cute fan shapes. Patterson's a big believer in eating healthy, organic food, so spending 15 to 20 minutes preparing her daughter's lunch is "totally worth it so she can have a good, high-quality lunch every day. " But a lunch doesn't have to be Pinterest-worthy to be healthy and fun. It just takes a little planning and a stock of convenient, kid-approved foods.
NEWS
August 10, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cherry Hill appears to have arrived on the culinary front as South Jersey's latest foodie town. The township will host its first Restaurant Week - modeled after Philadelphia's but on a smaller scale - Sunday through next Saturday. "It's great for Cherry Hill to do something on its own," said Aldo Lamberti, owner of Caffe Aldo Lamberti at 2011 Route 70 W., one of the participants. "Of course, not just Cherry Hill people are coming to town. " Twenty-one other restaurants are taking part - located along Routes 70 and 38, and at Cherry Hill Mall and the Market Place at Garden State Park.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
WHAT DOES YOUR weekday work lunch look like? A stale granola bar? A pallid ham-and-cheese from that weirdly lit bodega downstairs? A freezer-burned Lean Cuisine, begging to be tossed across the office like an Olympic discus? A stack of Pringles from the old tube your cubicle mate keeps in his bottom drawer, next to the pushpins and rubber bands? Your average American employee, especially those who sit at a desk in front of a computer, isn't exactly renowned for creativity when it comes to midday meal planning.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
AT FIRST, Philadelphia teacher LeShawna Coleman believed she'd be meeting with Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to discuss education issues. Late last week, she was informed that things had changed: Coleman would be having a luncheon meeting with President Obama instead. Coleman, who as a teacher coach with the district works with teachers in classrooms, was one of four educators to have an "honest, open conversation" with Obama in the White House. Duncan was also present. "It's a once-in-a-lifetime experience," Coleman said.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia teacher LeShawna Coleman had some interesting lunch company Wednesday: President Obama. Coleman, a 13-year Philadelphia School District veteran, teacher coach, and English as a Second Language teacher, had expected to travel to Washington for a U.S. Department of Education event about teacher equity. (The Education Department introduced a program Monday to get more strong teachers in the nation's poorest schools.) But last week, she learned she was one of four teachers nationwide chosen to lunch with the president and Education Secretary Arne Duncan.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying stricter federal nutrition guidelines are too much to swallow, the Unionville-Chadds Ford School District has decided to remove its 1,300 high school students from the program that is to go into effect next school year. In deciding last week that the students would not join the 31 million across the country who get free or reduced-price lunches through the National School Lunch Program, the district said its own food policies were healthy enough for its high schoolers. The district's middle school and four elementary schools will still participate.
NEWS
June 18, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
First, the nation agreed that its children are too heavy and unhealthy. Then, the federal government - Democrats and Republicans together channeling scientific research - hammered out ideas to reduce fat, calories, and salt in school meals. Now, that harmonious effort is splintering as a food fight embroiling Congress, health professionals, the White House, and even cafeteria workers threatens to rage through the summer and disrupt lunch period come September. In an odd twist, the School Nutrition Association (SNA)
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