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Lunch Counter

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NEWS
July 12, 2012 | BY ANNA PAN, Daily News Staff Writer
IN A CONTEST over a humble lunch counter in Reading Terminal Market, the U.S. Olympic Committee won't win a gold medal for sprinting. Three decades after it burst from the starting block, the Greek eatery Olympic Gyro has received a cease-and-desist email from the USOC, the nonprofit corporation responsible for training and funding U.S. teams. The June 7 notice demanded deletion of the word "Olympic" from the food shop's title, claiming copyright of the word under a 1978 law. Congress granted the USOC all commercial use of Olympic imagery and terminology in the nation, including the word "Olympic" and the symbol of five interlocked rings.
FOOD
March 17, 2016
When the little Japanese grocery called Maido! closed its original location in Narberth, cooks seeking a local store for kombu, hand-pounded mochi rice cakes, or a wide range of imported furikake rice seasonings went into withdrawal. More important, Maido's lunch counter, known for homey rice bowls topped with chicken katsu in thick curry gravy and for tender gyu don beef stewed in sweet soy broth, was missed. Well, Maido! reemerged in the fall in a bright new space in Ardmore.
NEWS
October 17, 1993 | United Press International
It was at a Woolworth's in Greensboro, N.C., in 1960 that four black students sat at an off-limits lunch counter, a key moment in the movement that broke the back of segregationism. Last week, the chain announced that the store was one of 720 to close in the coming months. The store's historic status had won it a reprieve last year.
NEWS
December 27, 1996 | Inquirer photographs by Tom Gralish
Like a ghost of commuter railroads past, the Reading Terminal Headhouse, at 12th and Market, has stood silent and virtually unchanged since closing, at age 91, in 1984. There exists no eerier witness to that lost era than the second-floor Gateway Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge. A jar of relish waits on its lunch counter, not far from a "Nearly Everybody Reads the Bulletin" train schedule. Soon, though, workers will renovate. The Hard Rock Cafe is bound for Center City.
NEWS
August 31, 1991 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hibberd Moore Twaddell, 73, the former co-owner of a pink-trim, stainless steel diner in Paoli that featured apple dumplings and roasted Chester County turkeys, died Wednesday at Chester County Hospital in West Chester. For 30 years, Mr. Twaddell and his brother Hiram ran the Twaddell Diner on Lancaster Avenue, just east of Route 202. People called the Twaddell boys "Hi and Hib. " Both were "tall, dark and handsome," but they had different personalities, said Hib's wife of 40 years, the former Charlotte Bradford.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's not the sights that entice. It's the sounds - the sizzle of hamburger on a hot grill and the mechanical purr of a Hamilton Beach blender as it transforms syrup and ice cream into a milkshake. And it's the smells - coffee, eggs, mustard, grease. Listen closely, and take a last whiff, because it's going away. At the close of business today, the Wynnewood Pharmacy shuts its doors forever, taking with it its L-shaped lunch counter, a piece of Americana that for 50 years has been a gathering place for those in search of a good hot dog and friendly conversation.
NEWS
September 16, 2010
Ronald W. Walters, 72, a longtime political scholar and analyst at Howard University and the University of Maryland who was a leading expert on race and politics, has died. University of Maryland spokesman Lee Tune said that Dr. Walters died Friday night. He had been suffering from cancer. Dr. Walters spent 25 years at Howard before becoming director of the African American Leadership Institute at the University of Maryland. He wrote more than 100 articles and numerous books, including 1987's Black Presidential Politics in America: A Strategic Approach , in which he discussed the path a black presidential candidate would need to take.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not the sights that entice. It's the sounds - the sizzle of hamburger on a hot grill and the mechanical purr of a Hamilton Beach blender as it transforms syrup and ice cream into a milkshake. And it's the smells - coffee, eggs, mustard, grease. Listen closely, and take a last whiff, because it's going away. At the close of business today, the Wynnewood Pharmacy shuts its doors forever, taking with it its L-shaped lunch counter, a piece of Americana that for 50 years has been a gathering place for those in search of a good hot dog and friendly conversation.
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
What? No Woolworth's? Say it ain't so. How dare they vanquish one of my favorite places to hang out in with my grandmother during my childhood, having lunch, browsing and generally being spoiled rotten. For me, at least, the closing of more than 720 stores in the United States and Canada will surely signify the end of an era. All right. I confess that as an adult, I haven't exactly been a Woolworth preferred shopper (upward mobility and all that, don't cha know. And, besides, we got Kmart now)
NEWS
February 1, 1992 | By Lacy McCrary, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
McCrory's 5 & 10, a landmark in Bristol Borough's little-town business district, died yesterday. It was 63. Cause of death: the recession. Calling hours were 9 to 5. Many old friends came to pay their respects, their faces sad and wistful. Or to shop one more time at the dime store on Mill Street, in the heart of the Bucks County town's shopping area. "I'm here because it's the last day and I want to pay my respects to a place that has been here for so many years," said Margery Rose, 71. Rose lives in Grundy Tower, a 14-story public housing high-rise for senior citizens.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
March 17, 2016
When the little Japanese grocery called Maido! closed its original location in Narberth, cooks seeking a local store for kombu, hand-pounded mochi rice cakes, or a wide range of imported furikake rice seasonings went into withdrawal. More important, Maido's lunch counter, known for homey rice bowls topped with chicken katsu in thick curry gravy and for tender gyu don beef stewed in sweet soy broth, was missed. Well, Maido! reemerged in the fall in a bright new space in Ardmore.
TRAVEL
January 12, 2014 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
With its green and orange vinyl seats, stainless steel cutlery, and bright-red ketchup bottles, the lunch counter looked quite ordinary, like thousands around the country. It was the place where townspeople rubbed elbows and traded gossip. This counter, however, was far from ordinary. It's on the first floor of the F.W. Woolworth Building in Greensboro, N.C., and it played a pivotal role in the country's civil rights movement. 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, a high point in the African American struggle for equal rights that continues today.
NEWS
July 12, 2012 | BY ANNA PAN, Daily News Staff Writer
IN A CONTEST over a humble lunch counter in Reading Terminal Market, the U.S. Olympic Committee won't win a gold medal for sprinting. Three decades after it burst from the starting block, the Greek eatery Olympic Gyro has received a cease-and-desist email from the USOC, the nonprofit corporation responsible for training and funding U.S. teams. The June 7 notice demanded deletion of the word "Olympic" from the food shop's title, claiming copyright of the word under a 1978 law. Congress granted the USOC all commercial use of Olympic imagery and terminology in the nation, including the word "Olympic" and the symbol of five interlocked rings.
NEWS
February 13, 2012
Patricia Stephens Due, 72, whose belief that, as she put it, "ordinary people can do extraordinary things" propelled her to leadership in the civil rights movement, died Tuesday in Smyrna, Ga. The cause was thyroid cancer, her daughter Johnita Due said. At 13, Patricia Stephens challenged Jim Crow orthodoxy by trying to use the "whites only" window at a Dairy Queen. As a college student, she led demonstrations to integrate lunch counters, theaters, and swimming pools and was repeatedly arrested.
NEWS
September 16, 2010
Ronald W. Walters, 72, a longtime political scholar and analyst at Howard University and the University of Maryland who was a leading expert on race and politics, has died. University of Maryland spokesman Lee Tune said that Dr. Walters died Friday night. He had been suffering from cancer. Dr. Walters spent 25 years at Howard before becoming director of the African American Leadership Institute at the University of Maryland. He wrote more than 100 articles and numerous books, including 1987's Black Presidential Politics in America: A Strategic Approach , in which he discussed the path a black presidential candidate would need to take.
FOOD
April 9, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
On 10th Street south of Christian, which is still old-school South Philly, a Plexiglas box of leaflets was affixed to the door at Shank's luncheonette last week, confirming rumors that had been swirling for months. "Shank's is Relocating," they said. "Since 1962. " Which is to say that the luncheonette - typically prefixed with the words "classic Italian" - has been there since then, though they round it off: "For 48 years," the all-woman (all in black) counter staff will tell you, following the lead of Evelyn Perri, the owner and matriarch.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's not the sights that entice. It's the sounds - the sizzle of hamburger on a hot grill and the mechanical purr of a Hamilton Beach blender as it transforms syrup and ice cream into a milkshake. And it's the smells - coffee, eggs, mustard, grease. Listen closely, and take a last whiff, because it's going away. At the close of business today, the Wynnewood Pharmacy shuts its doors forever, taking with it its L-shaped lunch counter, a piece of Americana that for 50 years has been a gathering place for those in search of a good hot dog and friendly conversation.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not the sights that entice. It's the sounds - the sizzle of hamburger on a hot grill and the mechanical purr of a Hamilton Beach blender as it transforms syrup and ice cream into a milkshake. And it's the smells - coffee, eggs, mustard, grease. Listen closely, and take a last whiff, because it's going away. At the close of business today, the Wynnewood Pharmacy shuts its doors forever, taking with it its L-shaped lunch counter, a piece of Americana that for 50 years has been a gathering place for those in search of a good hot dog and friendly conversation.
NEWS
January 5, 2003 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Depending on how you feel about change, you could say that the owners of the Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant have done a lot for suburban renewal. The third Iron Hill establishment, which opened here in June 2000, is a warehouse-size building that had been an A&P supermarket and later Eckerd Drugs. Judging from the lunchtime crowd that jammed the restaurant recently, Iron Hill has helped to transform the borough's staid image, just as it has for West Chester, Chester County's seat.
NEWS
July 18, 2002 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After 38 years behind a luncheonette counter, Grace Ball thought her days of serving chow were over when her husband, Jim Ball, died. The Lord had other plans, Grace Ball Bean said, as she dished out meals with a smile recently at the St. John's Episcopal Church soup kitchen. She and her second husband, Cecil Bean, began volunteering at the soup kitchen in 1989 and became full-time nonpaid directors in 1992. "I love what I do. You cannot come in this kitchen if you don't love people the way our Lord loved people," Bean said.
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