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Lunch Truck

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NEWS
April 15, 2008 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mike's lunch truck sits, red and conspicuous, in a dirty cityscape of bricks and industry in workaday South Philly. The noise here at Front and Pattison Streets is endless: I-95 highway whine and truck roar, along with clanking, booming sounds from warehouses and produce-packing plants. Blue-collar people tend to work closer to noise, closer to moving parts and potential peril. Their tough lives make them two things: hungry for Mike's old-school protein - eggs and beef, mostly - and wary of any presidential candidate who seems unfamiliar.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The deliverymen seen showing up at David Young's lunch truck on Broad Street near Callowhill were not bringing hot dogs, cops said. They were bringing hot drugs to sell, they said. Young ran a citywide drug operation - supplying at least eight drug houses, investigators said. This week, Common Pleas Judge Anthony J. DeFino convicted Young, 27, of 16th Street near Chelten Avenue, and three associates of drug charges. They were committed to prison to await sentencing.
NEWS
November 15, 1999 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Frank McGuckin is breaking the law. This time he knows it. And as a matter of principle, he is going to keep on doing it. Since setting up his lunch truck in February across from the upscale Hunter Woods housing development, the spirited owner of Frank's Breakfast & Lunch has been at battle with township officials. They say his business, near the intersection of Route 322 and Fries Mill Road, has been in constant violation of zoning ordinances. He says they simply want to drive him out of business.
NEWS
July 25, 2014
Backstory: Andrea Capecci and her brother Nicholas are new to Philly's growing lunch-truck scene. They opened earlier this year but spent a couple of years kicking around ideas before setting on Pbon's interesting mix of seafood and sausage, inspired by the Philadelphia natives' upbringing: frequent trips to Bridesburg with their grandmother for hard-shell crabs, and twice-a-week traditional Italian dinners whipped up by their mother (think plenty...
FOOD
July 2, 2009
If you've had the pleasure of meeting the Vietnamese hoagie, may we introduce you to another strange-but-true hybrid - the Korean taco. It was born on a roving lunch truck in Los Angeles. But it made landfall in Queen Village a few months ago at Ansill, where a Korean-American cook does an astonishingly good version. The meat is a beefy shred of braised short rib and London broil, marinated in soy, sesame oil, garlic, scallion, and honey, then stuffed into a warm, crisped flour tortilla, drizzled with barbecue sauce, and topped with brightly crunchy daikon radish kim chi.  
NEWS
March 29, 1988 | By PAUL BAKER, Daily News Staff Writer
Former state Sen. Milton Street isn't one who likes to disappoint his customers. When Street learned from the Daily News yesterday that three Temple University students had taped about 50 protest signs with various slogans on his closed lunch truck on campus, he said he would rectify things immediately. "If students want it moved, we'll move it right away," said Street, a self-employed business consultant and part-time food concessionaire. A moment later, however, Street offered what seemed to him a better solution.
NEWS
September 17, 1987 | By PAUL BAKER, Daily News Staff Writer
T. Milton Street was in the middle of the street yesterday afternoon. And so was his lunch truck. The former state senator and current concessionaire parked his truck in the intersection of Montgomery Avenue and Park Mall on Temple University's campus to protest what he claims is police harassment of him and his business. Police arrived about 2:15 p.m. and towed the truck away because it was blocking traffic on the one-way street. "I'm tired of this quote, unquote s- - -," Street said.
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | By Sonia Krishnan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
David Bradley, a 1988 graduate of Plymouth-Whitemarsh High School, was shot to death Monday morning in Richmond, Calif., while he and a coworker stood at a lunch wagon outside the chemical plant where they worked. The gunman, Edilberto Sangco of Vallejo, Calif., a disgruntled employee of the company, then shot himself fatally in the head, said police in Richmond, just north of San Francisco. According to police, Sangco was just coming back to work after a five-day suspension.
NEWS
April 4, 1989 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The former bookkeeper for the Lawyers Title Insurance Co., has admitted juggling the company's checking account so she could steal more than $18,000 between 1986 and last year. Jennifer Foden, 23, of Malvern Avenue near 64th Street, was placed on 10 years' probation and ordered to make full restitution by Common Pleas Judge Paul Silverstein, after she pleaded guilty to theft and forgery charges. Assistant District Attorney Denis Cohen said yesterday Foden forged 37 checks from the company's escrow account - 21 made payable to herself and the others "written out in the name of a company official, whose name was forged.
NEWS
July 16, 2002 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As her two former neighbors were sentenced to life in prison for their role in killing her son, Temple University student Constantine Polites, Maria Polites said, "Today my son is at peace. They're going to prison forever. " Tom Moua, 23, and his brother, David, 18, had lived next to the Polites family in Upper Darby. On April 4, 2000, days before David Moua was to be married, the Mouas and their friend, Loi Nghiem, 21, decided to break into the Polites' home in search of money.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 25, 2014
Backstory: Andrea Capecci and her brother Nicholas are new to Philly's growing lunch-truck scene. They opened earlier this year but spent a couple of years kicking around ideas before setting on Pbon's interesting mix of seafood and sausage, inspired by the Philadelphia natives' upbringing: frequent trips to Bridesburg with their grandmother for hard-shell crabs, and twice-a-week traditional Italian dinners whipped up by their mother (think plenty...
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
"IT WAS like a giant C4 blast, like something in 'Counter Strike.' " That's what a 14-year-old boy told the Daily News last night, referring to a plastic explosive commonly used by the military, including the fictional soldiers in that popular video game. Fiction became reality yesterday in Feltonville, when a lunch truck parked on Wyoming Avenue near 3rd Street was enveloped in an devastating inferno that injured 11 people, including a mother, 42, and daughter, 17, who were working inside the truck at the time, police said.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
Twelve people were injured, including five who were seriously burned, when a propane tank on a food truck exploded, setting off "a very large fireball" Tuesday outside a Feltonville auto-body shop, police said. A 42-year-old woman and her 18-year-old daughter who worked on the truck were among those critically wounded when it exploded near Third Street and Wyoming Avenue about 5:30 p.m., police said. Both suffered third-degree burns over 50 percent of their bodies, said Police Chief Inspector Scott Small.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Paul F. Bradley
To diversify my investment portfolio, I recently took out a copyright on the word amazing . I charge 2 cents per use. Given Americans' penchant for using amazing to describe everything from a peanut butter sandwich to a 10-car pile-up straight out of a CHiPs episode, I am looking forward to an early retirement. I track the performance of this investment chiefly by tuning in to reality shows. They represent the biggest consumers of my word (and the barometer of our national intellect)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | Freelance
What's cooking? A classic sandwich selection — from turkey and cheese on white bread to a hearty Philly cheesesteak. A line can be found at Gus's for breakfast, too. They're family: Gus Katseftis and his wife, Joan, along with various family members, fed employees of the Daily News, Inquirer and philly.com for 21 years from Gus' spot next to the company's former headquarters at Broad and Callowhill streets. Convenient, yes, but what kept people coming back was the menu. Satisfied customers: "It's old-school," said Craig LaBan, Inquirer food critic and frequent Gus' customer.
FOOD
July 2, 2012 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the move of The Inquirer from its longtime home in the Inquirer Building, the impact ripples right out to the curb. Gus and Joan Katseftis will likely close or sell their lunch truck after 21 years. Joined by son-in-law Joe Carr, Gus and Joan served breakfast and lunch every weekday. In 10-degree weather or 110, they built a business and a community. It is remarkable what a warm relationship you can form spending just a few minutes with someone day after day. They took care of the newspaper staffs, and the staffs took care of them.
NEWS
April 28, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
In Friday's issue, parts of this story were garbled or left out because of a production error. The entire story is reprinted here.   It was Joyce Parker's final wish. As the original Miss Tootsie - whose premier soul-food restaurant at 13th and South bore her nickname - lay dying of pancreatic cancer last year, she made her son, Keven, promise to "get the work done. " Keven understood exactly what she meant. Giving back was always in Joyce Parker's DNA. Even before there was a Miss Tootsie's - which Keven has since expanded and transformed from a neighborhood spot into the luxe Miss Tootsie's Restaurant Bar Lounge - Joyce would find a way to help those in need.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | Annette John-Hall
It was Joyce Parker's final wish. As the original Miss Tootsie — whose premier soul-food restaurant at 13th and South bore her nickname — lay dying of pancreatic cancer last year, she made her son, Keven, promise to "get the work done. " Keven understood exactly what she meant. Giving back was always in Joyce Parker's DNA. Even before there was a Miss Tootsie's — which Keven has since expanded and transformed from a neighborhood spot into the luxe Miss Tootsie's Restaurant Bar Lounge — Joyce would find a way to help those in need.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2011 | By VANCE LEHMKUHL, lehmkuv@phillynews.com 215-854-2645
PART-TIME vegans are cropping up everywhere. There's the veggie-themed Meatless Mondays, a wartime campaign revived in 2003 by Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health. And New York Times food columnist Mark Bittman has touted his daily "vegan until 6 p.m. " plan for a while. In February the trend truly arrived with Oprah Winfrey's One-Week "Vegan Challenge": 378 Harpo staff members went animal-free for a week - no meat, no dairy, no eggs - and many chatted about their experiences with food gurus Michael Pollan and Kathy Freston.
NEWS
June 1, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
During his 20 years as a Philly-based FBI special agent, Bob Wittman is credited with recovering nearly a quarter-billion dollars worth of art. That's a lot of Monet. Wittman will return to the scene of one crime, the Penn Museum, for the first public appearance related to his book Priceless, which hits stores Tuesday. He and his coauthor, Inquirer reporter John Shiffman, will be set up at 6 p.m. next Tuesday beside the 19th-century Chinese crystal ball stolen from the museum in 1988 and recovered in 1991.
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