CollectionsLung Cancer
IN THE NEWS

Lung Cancer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | By Jim Detjen and Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writers
A Philadelphia biologist yesterday reported the discovery of a gene that may be a key player in lung cancer, the nation's leading cancer killer. If the discovery is borne out by further studies, it could lead to treatments and diagnostic tests for a disease that is expected to kill 143,000 Americans this year, said Carlo M. Croce, a molecular geneticist at Temple University and a member of the scientific team that made the discovery. Croce is internationally recognized in the rapidly expanding field of molecular genetics, which in the years ahead appears likely to solve a host of medicine's long-standing mysteries.
LIVING
September 25, 2000 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Blasting lung cancer with radiation and chemotherapy at the same time is more effective than using one after the other - the current standard treatment, according to a new study. Researchers with the Radiation Therapy Oncology group, a federally funded cancer clinical-trials group based in Philadelphia, found that while side effects from treatment were more severe with "concurrent" therapy, patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, which is generally caused by smoking, lived an average of 2.5 months longer - 17.1 months versus 14.6 months.
NEWS
August 12, 2005 | Rosalind Brannigan
Rosalind Brannigan recently resigned as vice president of Drug Strategies, a nonprofit research institute Dana Reeve's announcement and Peter Jennings' death are casting a spotlight on a dirty secret about lung cancer: You don't have to be a smoker to get it. This year, deaths from lung cancer will exceed the number of deaths from almost every other cancer combined, and even people who gave up smoking decades ago, and people who have never...
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | Marc Schogol from reports including Psychology Today magazine; the ACSH News & Views, a publication of the American Council on Science and Health, and Inquirer wire services
CANCER-TREATMENT VAGARIES. If you've got lung cancer, you're more likely to undergo surgery, radiation treatment or chemotherapy if you're married and have private medical insurance. But if you're over 75, you're less likely. So says a report in today's New England Journal of Medicine, which concludes that social and economic considerations can play as big a role as medical factors in lung-cancer treatment. Said the report: "The greater frequency of surgery in patients with lung cancer who were married suggests . . . doctors treated married patients more aggressively, perhaps attempting to cure when they would otherwise (ease the pain)
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | By Alfonso Chardy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Periodically, rumors circulate in Miami and Washington about the health of Cuban President Fidel Castro - mostly that he is dying, is dead or has been assassinated. In all cases, the rumors are quickly denied and laid to rest. Yesterday was one of those days. A small item in this week's edition of Time magazine quoting Soviet officials as saying Castro has lung cancer prompted Miami's Spanish-language radio stations to broadcast the report and U.S. officials in Washington to scramble for the latest data on the Cuban leader's health.
NEWS
September 5, 1995 | By Michael Schudson
I call you a dirty, low-down, good-for-nothing son of a gun. You sue me. Your lawyers furnish solid evidence that you shower daily. I publicly retract "dirty" while standing behind "low-down, good-for-nothing son of a gun. " I pay your legal fees and we call it quits. At that point, are you going to crow to the world about your great victory? The answer is yes, if you manufacture a product that is addictive, a chief cause of lung cancer and emphysema and a contributing cause of heart disease and which most users become habituated to while they are children or teenagers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tammy Faye Messner has been the butt of jokes most of her professional life, especially when she served as wife of disgraced televangelist Jim Bakker. But now the author of the self-help tome I Will Survive . . . And You Will, Too!, has some very serious news to share. Messner, 62, told CNN's Larry King on Thursday that she has inoperable lung cancer. "God knows I'm scared," she said. "But it's not wrong to be scared. " But she also struck an upbeat note, telling one caller that she "believes in miracles" and another that she is considering holistic medicine in addition to chemotherapy to treat her illness.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2002 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Willard G. Rouse 3d, developer of Liberty Place and chairman of the long effort to build the new Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, is undergoing chemotherapy for lung cancer this weekend at Fox Chase Cancer Center. "I'm feeling fine, except that I've got a time bomb ticking inside of me. That's the price you pay for smoking," he said in a telephone interview yesterday. After the three treatments this weekend, there will be an 18-day break before more treatment, Rouse said.
SPORTS
March 10, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Dodgers Hall of Fame shortstop Pee Wee Reese is undergoing five weeks of radiation treatment for lung cancer, according to friends. Reese, 78, who overcame prostate cancer years ago, had a lung tumor removed that was malignant, the Los Angeles Times reported yesterday. Reese, who also is recovering from a broken hip, started radiation treatments a week ago. He will undergo 25 treatments - five days a week for five weeks - in Venice, Fla. "He looks fine, but he's not real well," said Buzzie Bavasi, the former Dodgers general manager, who saw Reese at a Hall of Fame Veterans Committee meeting last week in Tampa.
SPORTS
January 22, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Larry Gilbert, a three-time winner on the Senior PGA Tour who was diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer last September, died yesterday in Lexington, Ky. He was 55. Gilbert, who won the Senior Players Championship in July, was diagnosed Sept. 2 during a routine physical. He was one of four senior tour members diagnosed with cancer in 1997. Arnold Palmer and Jim Colbert had prostate surgery, and Bruce Devlin had his right kidney removed. Gilbert was the only one of the four whose condition could not be treated.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 19, 2016
Bonnie Brown, 77, one of three siblings whose smooth harmonies as the Browns influenced generations of singers from the Beatles to Lady Antebellum, died Saturday. Her publicist, Kirt Webster, said Ms. Brown died in Little Rock of complications from lung cancer. With older siblings Jim Ed Brown and Maxine Brown, the three helped define the Nashville sound of the 1950s and '60s. They were inducted in 2015 into the Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum after Jim Ed's death that year. The Browns crossed over into pop, folk, and rhythm and blues, including the No. 1 hit "The Three Bells," previously a success for the French cabaret singer Edith Piaf.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Shares of Merck rose Thursday after the drugmaker said its Keytruda immuno-oncology medicine succeeded in a study of patients with advanced lung cancer and showed a survival advantage over patients given standard chemotherapy. Based on the results, an independent data monitoring board recommended that the clinical trial be stopped and that patients receiving chemotherapy be allowed to switch to the company's treatment. Merck, based in Kenilworth, N.J., employs about 9,200 in West Point and Upper Gwynedd in Montgomery County.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: What if the person you need to forgive is yourself? I bullied my younger sister as a kid/teen, and as a grown thirty-something, I feel incredible shame and guilt. I have apologized to her as an adult, which she seemed to have accepted, and I know much of it stemmed from being bullied and abused throughout those years myself. However, I can't seem to get past how I contributed to a lousy childhood for my sister - someone for whom I would now do anything and who will barely speak to me and the rest of our family.
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Nineteen years ago, Elyce Cardonick got a call about a newly diagnosed lymphoma patient whose fast-growing chest tumor was causing severe breathing problems. The cancer patient was 13 weeks pregnant and had rejected her oncologist's advice to abort before starting toxic chemotherapy. Cardonick, a young maternal-fetal medicine specialist then at Jefferson University Hospital , discovered that little was known about treating cancer during pregnancy. The issue became her calling, inspiring her to create the Pregnancy and Cancer Registry to collect data about treatment and long-term results for both mothers and children.
NEWS
January 3, 2016
Mike Oxley, 71, a former U.S. representative who helped write landmark antifraud legislation following a wave of corporate scandals that brought down Enron Corp. and WorldCom Inc., died Friday in his sleep in McLean, Va., after suffering from non-small-cell lung cancer, a type of lung cancer seen in nonsmokers, said his wife, Patricia Oxley. Mr. Oxley was chairman of the Lung Cancer Alliance board of directors. Though his cancer was a shock to the nonsmoker, he took the diagnosis in stride, said Laurie Fenton Ambrose, the alliance's president and CEO. Mr. Oxley "never lost his irreverent sense of humor and his distinctive laugh that could be heard throughout the office whenever he came by for a visit," Ambrose said.
NEWS
November 26, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kenneth R. Rocks Sr., 65, an Army paratrooper and Philadelphia city patrolman who rose to become a vice president of Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5, died Saturday, Nov. 21, of lung cancer at Fox Chase Cancer Center. A longtime Philadelphian, he had retired to Lewes, Del., in 2010. "The world lost a great man yesterday," a niece, Claire Rocks, wrote on Facebook. "Protect and serve: It was not just a job, it was a way of being. This wasn't just for his family but also for the rest of the country, as he served in the Vietnam War, and as a Philadelphia police officer and FOP leader.
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
TORONTO - "I wanted to bring Laurel back to life in the best way possible," says Julianne Moore, talking about Laurel Hester, the Ocean County, N.J., police detective the actress portrays in Freeheld . "Laurel was always really interested in the justice system. She was a good guy, she believed in the good guys and taking care of the underdog," Moore says. "She was a very, very good police officer . . . and at this point in her life, she wanted justice for the woman that she loved.
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Personalized cancer therapy is no longer just an exciting prospect, and better survival rates - as well as escalating spending - are proving it. "It's here. It's definitely here," said Pasi Jänne, an oncologist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. "Today, it's the most effective way to treat patients: figure out the genetic fingerprint of an individual's cancer and tailor the therapies to it. " This year, President Obama announced an initiative focused on "precision medicine.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patients with late-stage lung cancer face a grim prognosis. So do those with mesothelioma, a rare, incurable type of lung cancer usually caused by exposure to asbestos. Merck & Co.'s hot new immunotherapy drug Keytruda could be a potent new weapon against these fearsome diseases, according to three studies presented in recent days at the American Association for Cancer Research conference in Philadelphia. Equally exciting, Keytruda is just one in a growing class of drugs that remove an immune system brake that cancer exploits to evade attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
B RITTANY DANIEL , one of the blond-bombshell identical twins from the TV drama "Sweet Valley High," shared her story of surviving Stage 4 cancer at the American Association for Cancer Research's annual meeting last night in Center City. She had kept it under wraps for awhile, but Daniel was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in 2011. Last year, she decided it was time to break her silence. "I felt like this was important to fully heal," Daniel told me. Hosted by the media-driven nonprofit Stand Up to Cancer (SU2C)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|