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Lung Cancer

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NEWS
May 16, 1991 | By Jim Detjen and Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writers
A Philadelphia biologist yesterday reported the discovery of a gene that may be a key player in lung cancer, the nation's leading cancer killer. If the discovery is borne out by further studies, it could lead to treatments and diagnostic tests for a disease that is expected to kill 143,000 Americans this year, said Carlo M. Croce, a molecular geneticist at Temple University and a member of the scientific team that made the discovery. Croce is internationally recognized in the rapidly expanding field of molecular genetics, which in the years ahead appears likely to solve a host of medicine's long-standing mysteries.
LIVING
September 25, 2000 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Blasting lung cancer with radiation and chemotherapy at the same time is more effective than using one after the other - the current standard treatment, according to a new study. Researchers with the Radiation Therapy Oncology group, a federally funded cancer clinical-trials group based in Philadelphia, found that while side effects from treatment were more severe with "concurrent" therapy, patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, which is generally caused by smoking, lived an average of 2.5 months longer - 17.1 months versus 14.6 months.
NEWS
August 12, 2005 | Rosalind Brannigan
Rosalind Brannigan recently resigned as vice president of Drug Strategies, a nonprofit research institute Dana Reeve's announcement and Peter Jennings' death are casting a spotlight on a dirty secret about lung cancer: You don't have to be a smoker to get it. This year, deaths from lung cancer will exceed the number of deaths from almost every other cancer combined, and even people who gave up smoking decades ago, and people who have never...
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | Marc Schogol from reports including Psychology Today magazine; the ACSH News & Views, a publication of the American Council on Science and Health, and Inquirer wire services
CANCER-TREATMENT VAGARIES. If you've got lung cancer, you're more likely to undergo surgery, radiation treatment or chemotherapy if you're married and have private medical insurance. But if you're over 75, you're less likely. So says a report in today's New England Journal of Medicine, which concludes that social and economic considerations can play as big a role as medical factors in lung-cancer treatment. Said the report: "The greater frequency of surgery in patients with lung cancer who were married suggests . . . doctors treated married patients more aggressively, perhaps attempting to cure when they would otherwise (ease the pain)
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | By Alfonso Chardy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Periodically, rumors circulate in Miami and Washington about the health of Cuban President Fidel Castro - mostly that he is dying, is dead or has been assassinated. In all cases, the rumors are quickly denied and laid to rest. Yesterday was one of those days. A small item in this week's edition of Time magazine quoting Soviet officials as saying Castro has lung cancer prompted Miami's Spanish-language radio stations to broadcast the report and U.S. officials in Washington to scramble for the latest data on the Cuban leader's health.
NEWS
September 5, 1995 | By Michael Schudson
I call you a dirty, low-down, good-for-nothing son of a gun. You sue me. Your lawyers furnish solid evidence that you shower daily. I publicly retract "dirty" while standing behind "low-down, good-for-nothing son of a gun. " I pay your legal fees and we call it quits. At that point, are you going to crow to the world about your great victory? The answer is yes, if you manufacture a product that is addictive, a chief cause of lung cancer and emphysema and a contributing cause of heart disease and which most users become habituated to while they are children or teenagers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tammy Faye Messner has been the butt of jokes most of her professional life, especially when she served as wife of disgraced televangelist Jim Bakker. But now the author of the self-help tome I Will Survive . . . And You Will, Too!, has some very serious news to share. Messner, 62, told CNN's Larry King on Thursday that she has inoperable lung cancer. "God knows I'm scared," she said. "But it's not wrong to be scared. " But she also struck an upbeat note, telling one caller that she "believes in miracles" and another that she is considering holistic medicine in addition to chemotherapy to treat her illness.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2002 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Willard G. Rouse 3d, developer of Liberty Place and chairman of the long effort to build the new Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, is undergoing chemotherapy for lung cancer this weekend at Fox Chase Cancer Center. "I'm feeling fine, except that I've got a time bomb ticking inside of me. That's the price you pay for smoking," he said in a telephone interview yesterday. After the three treatments this weekend, there will be an 18-day break before more treatment, Rouse said.
SPORTS
March 10, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Dodgers Hall of Fame shortstop Pee Wee Reese is undergoing five weeks of radiation treatment for lung cancer, according to friends. Reese, 78, who overcame prostate cancer years ago, had a lung tumor removed that was malignant, the Los Angeles Times reported yesterday. Reese, who also is recovering from a broken hip, started radiation treatments a week ago. He will undergo 25 treatments - five days a week for five weeks - in Venice, Fla. "He looks fine, but he's not real well," said Buzzie Bavasi, the former Dodgers general manager, who saw Reese at a Hall of Fame Veterans Committee meeting last week in Tampa.
SPORTS
January 22, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Larry Gilbert, a three-time winner on the Senior PGA Tour who was diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer last September, died yesterday in Lexington, Ky. He was 55. Gilbert, who won the Senior Players Championship in July, was diagnosed Sept. 2 during a routine physical. He was one of four senior tour members diagnosed with cancer in 1997. Arnold Palmer and Jim Colbert had prostate surgery, and Bruce Devlin had his right kidney removed. Gilbert was the only one of the four whose condition could not be treated.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Personalized cancer therapy is no longer just an exciting prospect, and better survival rates - as well as escalating spending - are proving it. "It's here. It's definitely here," said Pasi Jänne, an oncologist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. "Today, it's the most effective way to treat patients: figure out the genetic fingerprint of an individual's cancer and tailor the therapies to it. " This year, President Obama announced an initiative focused on "precision medicine.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patients with late-stage lung cancer face a grim prognosis. So do those with mesothelioma, a rare, incurable type of lung cancer usually caused by exposure to asbestos. Merck & Co.'s hot new immunotherapy drug Keytruda could be a potent new weapon against these fearsome diseases, according to three studies presented in recent days at the American Association for Cancer Research conference in Philadelphia. Equally exciting, Keytruda is just one in a growing class of drugs that remove an immune system brake that cancer exploits to evade attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
B RITTANY DANIEL , one of the blond-bombshell identical twins from the TV drama "Sweet Valley High," shared her story of surviving Stage 4 cancer at the American Association for Cancer Research's annual meeting last night in Center City. She had kept it under wraps for awhile, but Daniel was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in 2011. Last year, she decided it was time to break her silence. "I felt like this was important to fully heal," Daniel told me. Hosted by the media-driven nonprofit Stand Up to Cancer (SU2C)
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1962, President John F. Kennedy committed the nation to landing a man on the moon by decade's end. In July 1969, it was mission accomplished. A half-century later, invoking Kennedy's challenge, scientists at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center announced they, too, were shooting for the moon. They launched the Cancer Moonshots Program, with the aim of reducing cancer deaths within five to 10 years. "It's a very goal-oriented effort that seems to impact one thing - and that is cancer mortality," Dr. Ronald DePinho, president of MD Anderson, said Saturday at the annual meeting convened by the Philadelphia-based American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | By Huizhong Wu, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Harvey Taylor Jr. was the type of person who would volunteer for an experimental therapy for lung cancer because the results could potentially help others. A lifelong journalist, community leader, and education advocate, Mr. Taylor, 71, of Wilmington, died Saturday, April 4, at his home after a three-year battle with lung cancer. He worked at the Wilmington News Journal from 1966 to 2005, with only a two-year break, serving as an obituary writer, education reporter, and metropolitan editor.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Spit is central to Stephen Swanick's vision for detecting disease. His product, SaliMark OSCC, which debuted this month, uses genetic material in saliva to judge the risk of whether an oral lesion is cancerous. Swanick, 51, left his job in the medical-device industry and spent $1.3 million of his own money to pursue this. He founded PeriRx in Broomall in 2008, hoping spit would help spot a spectrum of illnesses, from lung cancer to diabetes. Instead, it has been a long slog, much like spitting in the wind.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Medical Society, which represents thousands of the state's doctors, says it will be entering the legal battle over $1 million in sanctions imposed by a Philadelphia judge on a lawyer who represents physicians in medical malpractice cases. Society president-elect Scott Shapiro, an Abington cardiologist, said he expects his organization to file legal papers in support of Berwyn lawyer Nancy Raynor to overturn the sanctions. "Multiple physicians have reached out to me, and they have all indicated in a variety of ways that this will impact physicians' ability to have the full benefit of a complete and thorough defense if they are named in a malpractice case," Shapiro said.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Radiation is a powerful cancer treatment, but protecting healthy tissue from the scatter of damaging rays is challenging. As a result, women who get radiation for cancer in their left breast - which overlaps the heart - have been found to be at increased risk of heart disease and lung cancer. A new study by Thomas Jefferson University researchers confirms that such women can significantly reduce the incidental radiation dose to their hearts with a simple technique: holding their breath.
NEWS
November 15, 2014
THE SEAMLESS vision of life, as the late Cardinal Joseph Bernardin once noted, is the only way to ensure individual dignity. We are only as strong as the weakest links in our human chain, so the way we treat the young, the sick and the elderly is the truest bellwether of our evolution as a compassionate society. Lately, though, that compassion has been lacking and I suspect it's due in no small part to our cavalier attitude toward unborn life. If you are capable of dehumanizing something at its most elemental level and packaging it as a wholly dependent appendage of a woman, it's a short step from there to seeing older and ailing Americans as dependent appendages of society.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
While there is much hopeful news these days on the cancer treatment front, a new report finds that many patients are suffering from unmet financial, emotional, and physical needs. Many struggle with serious anxiety, fatigue, and difficulty working, according to the Cancer Support Community report. As they live longer, patients say they need more help coping with long-term side effects. A significant portion have skimped on medical care and many have cut spending on food to save money.
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