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Lung Cancer

NEWS
November 14, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David S. Frieder, 67, of Bala Cynwyd, a former sales executive and financial adviser who advocated for cancer patients, died of lung cancer Nov. 2 at his home. When Mr. Frieder was diagnosed with cancer five years ago, he became committed to bonding with his children and grandchildren, said his wife, Joan Snellenburg Frieder. He spent time with them in Bala and at their vacation home in Garrett County, Md., nicknamed "Camp David. " Between chemotherapy sessions, she said, he went whitewater rafting, hiked, golfed, attended ball games, and went out to dinner with his family.
NEWS
November 19, 2011 | By John P. Martin and Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The child sex-abuse scandal that devastated the Pennsylvania State University football program and its fans added a new dimension Friday: Joe Paterno has cancer. The former coach, 84, was diagnosed last weekend with a "treatable form of lung cancer" during an examination for a bronchial illness, his son Scott said in a statement. Paterno "is currently undergoing treatment, and his doctors are optimistic that he will make a full recovery," Scott Paterno said. Details about the illness emerged as scrutiny continued of Paterno, other university officials, and Jerry Sandusky, the longtime assistant coach accused of molesting eight boys during and after his career at Penn State.
NEWS
June 24, 1986
"Fixing the odds in cancer stakes" by Dorothy Storck (June 12) is unfortunately no way to fix the odds in the cancer stakes. To discount air pollution as one of the major causes of lung cancer is to disregard the facts. Dr. Samuel Epstein, a prominent cancer scientist and authority on air pollution and cancer, contends in The Politics of Cancer that air pollution causes more than 40 percent of all cancers. His research comparing the states of New Jersey and Wyoming showed that while both states had approximately the same tobacco consumption per capita, New Jersey had 40 percent more lung cancer.
NEWS
February 7, 1986
Richard J. Hickey (Op-ed Page, Jan. 31) claims there is no scientific evidence that cigarette smoking causes lung cancer. The smoking of cigarettes began around 1900 and became popular during and after World War I. During the 1930s and '40s physicians were puzzled by the large number of men who were experiencing lung cancer - formerly a rare disease; in the 1950s it became clear that nearly all were cigarette smokers. The first definitive study, in 1950, reported that of 648 lung cancer patients, 94 percent smoked cigarettes and only 2 percent were nonsmokers.
NEWS
June 15, 2005 | By MARGARET O. KIRK For the Daily News
IF ALL GOES as planned in the Wistar Institute laboratory of Dr. David W. Speicher, he will one day walk into his physician's office for a routine checkup and wait patiently while his doctor draws an extra tube of blood. And the contents of that tube could foretell early signs of any number of cancers, including the first signs of lung cancer. According to Speicher, a blood test to detect lung cancer is only five, perhaps 10, years away from being a reality. He's leading a collaborative effort to develop just that with fellow scientists from Wistar, the University of Pennsylvania and the Fox Chase Cancer Center.
SPORTS
March 1, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Bobby Bonds is undergoing chemotherapy for lung cancer, 7 months after an operation to remove a cancerous tumor from his kidney. The Contra Costa Times in California reported yesterday that the lung cancer was diagnosed during the winter. He will undergo chemotherapy for 6 months. His son, Giants slugger Barry Bonds, confirmed the news. Bobby Bonds, 56, played for the Giants and seven other teams during a 14-season major league career, hitting 332 homers. Noteworthy Twins lefthander Eric Milton will have another operation on his left knee.
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
RICHARD BEN CRAMER, an iconic journalist and author who won a Pulitzer Prize at the Inquirer for his vivid overseas reporting, died Monday evening in Baltimore after a battle with lung cancer. He was 62. Cramer, who'd been living on Maryland's Eastern Shore and had been working on a book about New York Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez in recent years, died at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, according to his close friend James McBride. Cramer's death was confirmed by family members to other news organizations late Monday.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
During a grueling operation early last year, when the intractable five-pound tumor seemed to mock his skills, thoracic surgeon Joseph S. Friedberg felt buoyed by what he and his scrub-suited crew had already achieved. The University of Pennsylvania team battles pleural mesothelioma, a rare, ferocious, incurable type of lung cancer. Typically, patients die within a year of diagnosis. Yet more than two years after treatment at Penn, 27 out of 38 patients - 71 percent - were still alive, including four who had marked five years.
FOOD
November 15, 1987 | The Inquirer staff
A preliminary study of women in China suggests that prolonged exposure to smoky fumes from cooking oils may be an important cause of lung cancer, a researcher says. Such a conclusion would help explain the relatively high rate of lung cancer among Chinese women who do not smoke, said William Blot, chief of the biostatistics branch at the National Cancer Institute. "One of the reasons why Chinese women have higher lung cancer rates may be the exposure to these fumes," Blot said in a recent interview.
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