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Lung Cancer

NEWS
January 3, 2016
Mike Oxley, 71, a former U.S. representative who helped write landmark antifraud legislation following a wave of corporate scandals that brought down Enron Corp. and WorldCom Inc., died Friday in his sleep in McLean, Va., after suffering from non-small-cell lung cancer, a type of lung cancer seen in nonsmokers, said his wife, Patricia Oxley. Mr. Oxley was chairman of the Lung Cancer Alliance board of directors. Though his cancer was a shock to the nonsmoker, he took the diagnosis in stride, said Laurie Fenton Ambrose, the alliance's president and CEO. Mr. Oxley "never lost his irreverent sense of humor and his distinctive laugh that could be heard throughout the office whenever he came by for a visit," Ambrose said.
NEWS
November 26, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kenneth R. Rocks Sr., 65, an Army paratrooper and Philadelphia city patrolman who rose to become a vice president of Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5, died Saturday, Nov. 21, of lung cancer at Fox Chase Cancer Center. A longtime Philadelphian, he had retired to Lewes, Del., in 2010. "The world lost a great man yesterday," a niece, Claire Rocks, wrote on Facebook. "Protect and serve: It was not just a job, it was a way of being. This wasn't just for his family but also for the rest of the country, as he served in the Vietnam War, and as a Philadelphia police officer and FOP leader.
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
TORONTO - "I wanted to bring Laurel back to life in the best way possible," says Julianne Moore, talking about Laurel Hester, the Ocean County, N.J., police detective the actress portrays in Freeheld . "Laurel was always really interested in the justice system. She was a good guy, she believed in the good guys and taking care of the underdog," Moore says. "She was a very, very good police officer . . . and at this point in her life, she wanted justice for the woman that she loved.
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Personalized cancer therapy is no longer just an exciting prospect, and better survival rates - as well as escalating spending - are proving it. "It's here. It's definitely here," said Pasi Jänne, an oncologist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. "Today, it's the most effective way to treat patients: figure out the genetic fingerprint of an individual's cancer and tailor the therapies to it. " This year, President Obama announced an initiative focused on "precision medicine.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patients with late-stage lung cancer face a grim prognosis. So do those with mesothelioma, a rare, incurable type of lung cancer usually caused by exposure to asbestos. Merck & Co.'s hot new immunotherapy drug Keytruda could be a potent new weapon against these fearsome diseases, according to three studies presented in recent days at the American Association for Cancer Research conference in Philadelphia. Equally exciting, Keytruda is just one in a growing class of drugs that remove an immune system brake that cancer exploits to evade attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
B RITTANY DANIEL , one of the blond-bombshell identical twins from the TV drama "Sweet Valley High," shared her story of surviving Stage 4 cancer at the American Association for Cancer Research's annual meeting last night in Center City. She had kept it under wraps for awhile, but Daniel was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in 2011. Last year, she decided it was time to break her silence. "I felt like this was important to fully heal," Daniel told me. Hosted by the media-driven nonprofit Stand Up to Cancer (SU2C)
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1962, President John F. Kennedy committed the nation to landing a man on the moon by decade's end. In July 1969, it was mission accomplished. A half-century later, invoking Kennedy's challenge, scientists at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center announced they, too, were shooting for the moon. They launched the Cancer Moonshots Program, with the aim of reducing cancer deaths within five to 10 years. "It's a very goal-oriented effort that seems to impact one thing - and that is cancer mortality," Dr. Ronald DePinho, president of MD Anderson, said Saturday at the annual meeting convened by the Philadelphia-based American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | By Huizhong Wu, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Harvey Taylor Jr. was the type of person who would volunteer for an experimental therapy for lung cancer because the results could potentially help others. A lifelong journalist, community leader, and education advocate, Mr. Taylor, 71, of Wilmington, died Saturday, April 4, at his home after a three-year battle with lung cancer. He worked at the Wilmington News Journal from 1966 to 2005, with only a two-year break, serving as an obituary writer, education reporter, and metropolitan editor.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Spit is central to Stephen Swanick's vision for detecting disease. His product, SaliMark OSCC, which debuted this month, uses genetic material in saliva to judge the risk of whether an oral lesion is cancerous. Swanick, 51, left his job in the medical-device industry and spent $1.3 million of his own money to pursue this. He founded PeriRx in Broomall in 2008, hoping spit would help spot a spectrum of illnesses, from lung cancer to diabetes. Instead, it has been a long slog, much like spitting in the wind.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Medical Society, which represents thousands of the state's doctors, says it will be entering the legal battle over $1 million in sanctions imposed by a Philadelphia judge on a lawyer who represents physicians in medical malpractice cases. Society president-elect Scott Shapiro, an Abington cardiologist, said he expects his organization to file legal papers in support of Berwyn lawyer Nancy Raynor to overturn the sanctions. "Multiple physicians have reached out to me, and they have all indicated in a variety of ways that this will impact physicians' ability to have the full benefit of a complete and thorough defense if they are named in a malpractice case," Shapiro said.
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