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Lung Cancer

NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Cancer-tissue biopsies are no fun. Ask Christine Walsh, 48, of Bedminster, whose cancer began in her left breast in 2008 and eventually spread to her skin. Injecting lidocaine to numb her chest for a biopsy proved painful, as were the procedure and stitches that followed. "It was just another thing I had to face," says the mother of three, who eventually chose to undergo a double mastectomy. As a patient at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Walsh now has the option of having her metastatic cancer analyzed through a blood test.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ronald Schultz, 78, of Willingboro, a teacher and actor, died of lung cancer Wednesday, Oct. 8, at Virtua Memorial Hospital in Mount Holly. Mr. Schultz was born in Philadelphia. He graduated from South Philadelphia High School and went on to attend Temple University, where he played varsity basketball. Mr. Schultz took on several acting roles, performing at age 12 in "No Room for Peter Pan," a TV show about a child who didn't want to grow up. He appeared in the film The Hebrew Hammer in 2003 and as a Hebrew-school teacher in the 2009 Coen Brothers movie A Serious Man. Mr. Schultz fought cancer for 10 years after doctors gave him only two to three years to live, family members said.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
A third of patients who undergo surgery to remove cancerous tumors end up with microscopic pieces left behind. These overlooked remnants can lead to the recurrence of cancer after what was thought to be a successful surgery. Two surgeons at the University of Pennsylvania have joined forces to try to solve this problem. Their solution: making tumors glow. Using a combination of injectable dyes and high-resolution cameras, the surgeons found a way to image tumors during surgery and more easily identify their margins.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
George E. Westwood III, 60, a Philadelphia native who rose to the rank of captain in the Navy and served during the Gulf war and in Afghanistan, died July 28 after a long struggle with lung cancer. Mr. Westwood, who lived in Jacksonville, Fla., died during a visit to the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, said his daughter Mary Lena. He was born in Philadelphia and graduated from William Penn Charter School. He then attended Rollins College in Florida and graduated with a bachelor's degree in psychology.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just seven years from now, pancreatic cancer is projected to become this country's second-leading cancer killer, surpassed only by lung cancer and claiming 48,000 lives a year - nearly the population of Harrisburg. Now No. 4, pancreas cancer will climb in the ranking partly by becoming more common, but mostly because it is ferociously difficult to detect and treat, according to an analysis by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. "The dramatic increase in the anticipated number of deaths . . . is a wake-up call to the research and health-care systems in the United States," senior author Lynn M. Matrisian, a molecular biologist, wrote last month in the journal Cancer Research.
NEWS
May 14, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frederic L. "Rick" Ballard Jr., 72, of Bethesda, Md., who played a pivotal role in transforming his great-grandfather's small law office into Ballard Spahr, a national firm of more than 500 lawyers, died Sunday, May 11, of lung cancer at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington. A member of a prominent Philadelphia family known for its civic-mindedness, Mr. Ballard graduated from Harvard Law School and became one of the nation's first public finance lawyers specializing in the nascent field of bond law. Mr. Ballard had been undergoing treatment for lung cancer, but his death was unexpected and came as a blow to his loved ones and to colleagues at Ballard Spahr.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Lisa Scottoline's column, "Chick Wit," does not appear this week. Last Sunday, her mother, Mary Scottoline, died of lung cancer. Contact Lisa at lisa@scottoline.com . Read the obituary from Monday's Inquirer at www.inquirer.com/obituaries .
NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Russell J. Geiser never played an instrument, certainly not one with a Mummers string band. But at one time or another, each of his five children marched up Broad Street playing in a string band to celebrate New Year's Day. And at one time or another, his daughter Mary Raschilla said, Mr. Geiser was president of the Palmyra String Band, then of the Palmyra South Jersey String Band, and founder and president of the South Jersey String Band of...
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank Adler, 60, of Cherry Hill, a devoted husband and father with a love for computers, died at his home Sunday, March 16, after a five-month battle with lung cancer. "He fought a graceful, dignified battle against lung cancer," his wife, Betty, said Monday. "He had excruciating pain the last five months. " Betty Adler, a health lawyer for the University of Pennsylvania/Penn Medicine and president of the Jewish Federation of Southern New Jersey, said she and her husband knew each other from childhood.
NEWS
February 12, 2014
CHRISTINE Flowers' column calling Philip Seymour Hoffman "selfish" because he overdosed and died was odd. Ms. Flowers acknowledged that addiction specialists believe that some addicts are too weak biologically and/or psychologically to overcome their addictions and therefore succumb. Ms. Flowers' response is, "I don't believe that. " I awaited her evidence that would refute all the trained addiction specialists, but all she offered was the trite "the human spirit is strong. " Well, I'm glad that's settled.
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