CollectionsLung Cancer
IN THE NEWS

Lung Cancer

NEWS
July 12, 2013 | Jenice Armstrong, Daily News Columnist
ALL SHAWN Hennessey wants is for his mom to get the same benefits that any other grieving widow would. But that's not likely to happen any time soon, since Pennsylvania still doesn't recognize gay marriage. His birth mother, Maureen Hennessey, was in a committed, loving relationship for 29 years with Mary Beth McIntyre, who died of lung cancer in May. Like any good son, Hennessey, who performs in a group called Hennessey Bonfire, can't stand the thought of seeing his mother go without.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
Cynthia Lufkin, 51, whose marriage to a cofounder of Wall Street firm Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette created a New York power couple in social and philanthropic circles, died Wednesday at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan of complications from breast and lung cancer. Her home was in Washington, Conn., north of New York City. After being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005 while pregnant with her second child, Ms. Lufkin focused her philanthropic work on the disease. With a degree in biochemistry, she was particularly interested in how healthy living could bolster the outlook for cancer patients, and her work led to the opening of the Cynthia Lufkin Fitness & Seminar Room at Sloan- Kettering's Evelyn H. Lauder Breast Center.
NEWS
June 16, 2013
Christopher Fifis, Nick Fifis, and John Fifis are the owners of Ponzio's Diner & Bakery Bar in Cherry Hill Growing up as sons of a first-generation Greek immigrant, we learned early about the value of hard work and family. As the owner of Ponzio's Diner in Cherry Hill, our dad spent almost every day for more than two decades greeting guests and entertaining them with his dry wit and sense of humor. We had dinner at the diner almost every night because our dad was always working, and when we were old enough, he put us to work there, too. On the rare occasion that our dad did take time off for a family vacation, we all piled into the car to head to Wildwood for a week, with Greek music turned up as loud as we could stand.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Days before he died, Fred McGraw realized that he would never know who killed his daughter - a mother of two shot execution-style behind the Jericho Fire Company in Deptford Township. Thursday marks seven years since Desiree McGraw, 27, was found dead. She had been a good student and an all-star pitcher in Audubon, Camden County, before her life took a tragic turn: She lived for three years on the streets of Camden, addicted to drugs. "On his deathbed, he made me promise him that I won't give up, and I won't," said McGraw's other daughter, Jennifer, 35, who helped care for her father at his Maple Shade home.
NEWS
June 4, 2013
Marshall Lytle, 79, the original bass player for Bill Haley & His Comets, one of the first bands to take rock 'n' roll mainstream, died Saturday at his home in New Port Richey, Fla., said a niece, Shayna Golda. He was diagnosed with lung cancer this year. Mr. Lytle recorded hits like "Rock Around the Clock" and "Shake, Rattle and Roll" with Haley in the 1950s. He was known for his percussive bass style, slapping the strings as he played. He would sometimes take the bass over his head or ride it like a surfboard.
NEWS
May 22, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
THE FEDERAL JURY that last week convicted North Philadelphia drug kingpin Kaboni Savage of 12 counts of murder began hearing arguments yesterday for his execution or for spending what's left of his life in an 8-by-10-foot cell in a "supermax" prison in Florence, Colo. Assistant U.S. Attorney David Troyer portrayed him as a vengeful, rage-filled, unrepentant murderer. Defense attorney William Purpura told the jurors that Savage was a victim of the mean streets after losing his father to cancer at age 13, but that he had grown into a mentor for his children and his older sister's children.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Connie Williams, 72, a community activist who worked with children and police to keep her East Camden neighborhood safe, died early Saturday, May 18, of lung cancer. Ms. Williams ran after-school and summer crime-prevention programs in an effort to keep children active and away from drugs. For the last decade, she had been president of the East Side Civic Association in Camden. "It's a sad day for the city," Camden County Police Chief Scott Thomson said. "Miss Connie was a mother hen to the children of East Camden.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
At the chemical plant in Toms River, nylon stockings would melt on the legs of secretaries sent on errands to production buildings. Noxious, colored smoke rose from the plant's stacks. Its effluent tinted the river, and fish caught there had a strange taste. At a nearby kids' swimming hole, a guy who took a dip came out with purplish foam clinging to his body. So when the children of Toms River began to be diagnosed with cancer - so many that one hospital doctor commented, "Another one from Toms River" - it was the plant's fault, right?
NEWS
March 21, 2013
Bobbie Smith, 76, a former lead singer of the Spinners, has died in Orlando, Fla. A statement released Monday by the manager of the rhythm-and-blues group said Mr. Smith died Saturday of complications from pneumonia and influenza. The statement said he had been diagnosed with lung cancer in November. Mr. Smith was the group's original lead singer and was the voice on its first hit, "That's What Girls Are Made For. " The group earned nearly a dozen gold records and a half-dozen Grammy nominations.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Maria Grasso sees it, people are dying because people aren't talking. So she is talking. " 'Have you had a colonoscopy?' I work that into every conversation," said Grasso, of Mount Laurel, who organized the fifth annual "Get Your Rear in Gear" race and walk in Fairmount Park on Sunday to benefit colorectal cancer research and treatment. Her father and grandfather died of it. Embarrassment, she said, often keeps people from talking about symptoms and from getting a colonoscopy, the test used to detect the nation's second-most fatal cancer.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|