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NEWS
January 11, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO - Smoking a joint once a week or a bit more apparently doesn't harm the lungs, suggests a 20-year study that bolsters evidence that marijuana doesn't do the kind of damage tobacco does. The results, from one of the largest and longest studies on the health effects of marijuana, are hazier for heavy users - those who smoke two or more joints daily for several years. The data suggest that using marijuana that often might cause a decline in lung function, but there weren't enough heavy users among the 5,000 young adults in the study to draw firm conclusions.
NEWS
January 3, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Javier Acosta, the Bronx boy who helped to improve children's access to adult donor lungs, is recovering from a double lung transplant at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, according to his mother. But his family's fight to change lung allocation rules turned out to be moot in his own case. Javier, who has cystic fibrosis, turned 12 in August, which automatically made him eligible for adolescent or adult lungs based on his medical need. Two months later, he received lungs from a donor over age 12. "I just want to let everyone know that Javier had a lung transplant on Oct. 13 and is doing fine," his mother, Milagros Martinez, said in a statement.
NEWS
June 30, 2013 | By Stacey Burling and Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writers
Sarah Murnaghan, the 10-year-old whose plight led to a national change in lung-transplant rules, suffered a catastrophic complication after receiving portions of adult lungs on June 12, necessitating a second transplant three days later, her parents revealed Friday. The Newtown Square girl is still being weaned from a ventilator at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, her parents said in a statement on Facebook, but is doing better. "It all happened very fast. We weren't expecting it," Janet Murnaghan said at a news conference Friday, explaining why it took almost two weeks to publicly reveal the second transplant.
SPORTS
May 21, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
They are the equine equivalent of those flexible strips that people wear on their noses to prevent snoring. With racehorses, the goal is to prevent bleeding in the lungs, ultimately allowing the animals to run faster. But do nasal strips work? Racing officials agreed Monday to allow the strips on horses competing in the Belmont Stakes on June 7 - including California Chrome, who wore the strips while winning the first two legs of the Triple Crown. Yet the announcement was accompanied by a statement from a state veterinarian that the strips "do not enhance equine performance.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By John P. Martin and Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writers
A federal judge in Philadelphia ordered the government Wednesday to suspend a lung allocation rule so that 10-year-old Sarah Murnaghan could be considered for donated lungs from adults. Judge Michael Baylson granted a 10-day temporary restraining order in response to a lawsuit filed just hours before by Sarah's parents, Janet and Fran Murnaghan of Newtown Square. The judge instructed Kathleen Sebelius, secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, to stop applying the "Under 12" rule, which requires that adult donor lungs be offered to waiting list patients age 12 and older before being offered to children such as Sarah.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sen. Arlen Specter continued to suffer surgical complications yesterday, a week after he had a heart bypass operation at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. He underwent a bronchoscopy yesterday to remove fluid from his lungs. A vaguely worded press release from his office in Washington said the Pennsylvania Republican was "breathing on his own with ventilatory assistance. " His vital signs were stable, according to the release. On Sunday, Specter, 68, had surgery to drain fluid from around his heart and left lung.
LIVING
October 4, 1999 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a smoggy day, with every breath you take, fine particles of pollution come streaming into the airways of your lungs. Those particles go deeper and stay down longer than many other pollutants, and that may be the reason why respiratory-related deaths and illness soar on smoggy days. Those are the findings reported recently by University of Delaware professor Anthony Wexler, in the Journal of Aerosol Science. "The deeper into the lungs these particles get, the longer they stay there," Wexler said, "and the more likely they can cause trouble.
NEWS
September 15, 2002 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Anthony Giordano's first six hours of breath were difficult ones. When he was born March 26 at Underwood-Memorial Hospital in Woodbury, his lungs weren't inflating properly. He was transferred to Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden, and finally to Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's neonatal intensive-care unit in Philadelphia. Anthony wasn't expected to live, and doctors asked his father, Glassboro Police Officer Ray Giordano, whether he wanted his son baptized.
NEWS
May 23, 1990 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
The "galloping" bacterial pneumonia that killed Muppets creator Jim Henson last week can be controlled - but only if a person recognizes that a mild fever and cough suddenly has become much worse. Five symptoms can signal the onset of bacterial pneumonia, a condition that can be life-threatening, according to Dr. Paul Epstein, chief of Graduate Hospital's pulmonary division. "If a person with a low-level virus suddenly develops high fever and chill, a cough with phlegm, or phlegm mixed with blood, or chest pain, or shortness of breath, these five things should tip you off that you need to see a doctor immediately.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sarah Murnaghan, the 10-year-old Newtown Square girl who received adult donor lungs last month after her family fought for a change in lung-allocation rules, now has pneumonia in her right lung, her mother said Monday. Through Facebook, Janet Murnaghan said that doctors believe the pneumonia was caused by "aspirations from her belly," or breathing stomach contents. She said Sarah had a "hard day" on Sunday but was more stable on Monday. She appeared to be responding to antibiotics, her mother said, but was requiring more breathing support from a ventilator.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
"Your Favorite Band Is Killing Me: What Pop Music Rivalries Reveal About the Meaning of Life," by Steven Hyden. Beatles vs. Stones. Biggie vs. Tupac. Kanye vs. Taylor. Ace rock scribe Hyden, host of the weekly Celebration Rock podcast, explores how what we feel about the music we love reveals about who we are. Back Bay Books $16.99. White Lung. Canadian punk quartet fronted by Mish Barber-Way makes its move toward the mainstream with the excellent new Paradise without watering down its bracing sound.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Shares of Merck rose Thursday after the drugmaker said its Keytruda immuno-oncology medicine succeeded in a study of patients with advanced lung cancer and showed a survival advantage over patients given standard chemotherapy. Based on the results, an independent data monitoring board recommended that the clinical trial be stopped and that patients receiving chemotherapy be allowed to switch to the company's treatment. Merck, based in Kenilworth, N.J., employs about 9,200 in West Point and Upper Gwynedd in Montgomery County.
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The battle over President Obama's clean power plan - in Congress and the courts, in the realms of commerce and common conversation - will rage for some time. But few are debating the value of the potential health benefits, which are expected to be significant. In the final rule announced Aug. 3, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has set a goal of reducing carbon pollution from the power-generating sector by 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. This major climate-change initiative focuses on power plants because they are a major contributor to carbon pollution, accounting for one-third of all carbon emissions in the U.S. The EPA has predicted that once the reductions are met, Americans will avoid up to 90,000 asthma attacks a year.
NEWS
May 9, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bobby Adams spent his wedding night on the operating table. He went under the knife at 11 p.m. and came out of surgery at 7 the next morning with two new lungs to go along with his new wife. The wedding on March 20 was not quite what Bobby and Ashley Adams had planned. Bobby was too weak to lift his head, much less get out of the intensive care unit bed at Temple University Hospital. He had more pipes in him than the Wanamaker organ, including a feeding tube taped to his nose that didn't enhance the wedding photos, and a tracheostomy in his throat, allowing him only to mouth the words "I do. " The decision to wed was so last-minute that they used gummy rings as wedding bands, and the bridesmaid, Ashley's best friend, provided music from her iPhone - Gareth Bush covering the Paramore song   "Still Into You" - as the bride processed into the room.
NEWS
January 10, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
The annual scourge known as the flu is always a serious health threat, and this season's version is particularly nasty. Not yet at its peak, the 2014-15 influenza season has already killed at least 36 people in Pennsylvania and rendered nearly 20,000 others into aching, feverish wretches, gasping for breath. The incidence of flu was high in Central and Northern New Jersey and moderate in the southern counties during the first week of January, the New Jersey Department of Health reported.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Janani Rangaswami, M.D., For The Inquirer
Evan's family looked on distraughtly as he lay in the intensive care unit, connected to a ventilator with a sea of tubes enveloping him. This was the third time the previously healthy sophomore had had to be hospitalized for sudden difficulty with breathing. Active on his college's basketball team, Evan began having problems three months earlier, when he lost consciousness and had a seizure on the basketball court. When he was rushed to the hospital, his lungs were found to be full of fluid, and his blood pressure was sky-high: 230/130.
SPORTS
August 7, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flyers defenseman Kimmo Timonen was in stable condition in a Finland hospital after blood clots were found in both of his lungs and his right calf, general manager Ron Hextall said Tuesday. Hextall said the team believes it could be a "long-term situation. " He said Timonen, 39, would be discharged from the hospital Wednesday but cannot travel for two to three weeks. The 15-year NHL veteran then will be evaluated by the team's medical staff, which has been in contact with the player's Finnish doctors, Hextall said.
SPORTS
May 21, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
They are the equine equivalent of those flexible strips that people wear on their noses to prevent snoring. With racehorses, the goal is to prevent bleeding in the lungs, ultimately allowing the animals to run faster. But do nasal strips work? Racing officials agreed Monday to allow the strips on horses competing in the Belmont Stakes on June 7 - including California Chrome, who wore the strips while winning the first two legs of the Triple Crown. Yet the announcement was accompanied by a statement from a state veterinarian that the strips "do not enhance equine performance.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Mark Benjamin M.D., For The Inquirer
A 20-year-old woman, who was overweight but otherwise healthy, started feeling an odd, dull pain in her chest. She hoped that if she put up with it for a few days, it might go away. But it didn't. So she went to see her family doctor, who immediately sent her to a cardiologist. She was given a stress test to see if exercise caused any changes in blood flow to her heart. The doctor also ordered an echocardiogram, which sends sound waves to the heart to measure the movement of the valves and heart muscle.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
  A panel of transplant experts is recommending permanent adoption of the temporary rule change that enabled a 10-year-old from Newtown Square to receive adult lungs in a transplant nine months ago. When Sarah Murnaghan's parents fought to improve their dying daughter's access to adult lungs, their tactics - including a media campaign and a federal lawsuit - set off an ethics storm. But now, the consensus seems to be that Janet and Francis Murnaghan raised legitimate concerns, and that the impact of expanding access is small because so few children need lung transplants.
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