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Luxor

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NEWS
December 7, 1997 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
The terrorist killings of 58 tourists at Luxor on Nov. 17 and State Department warnings that U.S. citizens should avoid travel to that part of Egypt at least through Feb. 17 have prompted many tour operators to cancel package tours to Egypt. The cancellations arise not only because many tourists want to heed the warning, but also because companies fear liability if clients run into problems. Big companies such as Tauck Tours, which had a new Egypt-Israel cruise tour in the works, and General Tours have canceled their trips for the near future, according to Travel Weekly.
NEWS
November 18, 1997 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gunmen disguised as policemen yesterday raked a crowd of foreign sightseers with machine-gun fire as they scurried for cover into the ancient tombs of the pharaohs in Luxor. At least 70 people died in the attack and ensuing gun battle, police said. It was by far the worst attack in a five-year insurgency that has targeted tourist sites in Egypt. The government blamed the attack on members of the Gama'a al-Islamiya, or Islamic Group, which aspires to replace Egypt's secular government with an Islamic regime.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Maggie Michael, Associated Press
LUXOR, Egypt - The terror lasted less than two minutes: Smoke poured from a hot-air balloon carrying sightseers on a sunrise flight over the ancient city of Luxor, it burst in a flash of flame, and then plummeted about 1,000 feet to earth. A farmer watched helplessly as tourists trying to escape the blazing gondola leaped to their deaths. Nineteen people were killed Tuesday in what was likely the deadliest hot-air-ballooning accident on record. A British tourist and the Egyptian pilot, who was badly burned, were the sole survivors.
NEWS
September 13, 2010
Egypt blocks spill to keep water safe LUXOR, Egypt - Authorities have blocked off water-purification stations along the Nile in southern Egypt to prevent more than 100 tons of diesel oil that leaked from a barge from polluting drinking water, officials said Sunday. The vessel was docked in Aswan, about 700 miles south of Cairo, when low water levels Saturday caused it to tilt, partially submerge, and leak 110 tons of diesel fuel into the Nile. Egypt gets much of its drinking water from the Nile.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1986 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
So there was Habiba tooling around Luxor with a cab driver hamed Hejjaj, when it occurred to her that Luxor was where the infamous dancing gypsies known as the Ghawazee had been banished to in the 1830s because Muhammed Ali, the viceroy of Egypt, felt they were a threat to the moral fiber of Cairo. And because Habiba has been belly dancing intensely for the last 12 years and was tooling around Luxor for the express purpose of being close to the source of her art, she asked Hejjaj if there was any chance of meeting these Ghawazee.
TRAVEL
March 20, 2011 | By Bill Ordine, For The Inquirer
Vacation at one Las Vegas casino-hotel and get to experience five other resorts - or at least some of their amenities - all for the same price. That's the pitch the MGM Resorts group of gambling halls is making as Vegas marketers try to come up with novel ways to attract tourists. As part of MGM Resorts' current promotion, six of the company's Vegas hotels clustered at the south end of the Strip - the MGM Grand, Mandalay Bay, Monte Carlo, New York-New York, Luxor, and Excalibur - are offering Spring Break Escape packages that bundle food, drink, and spa goodies until the end of April.
NEWS
May 3, 1987 | By Arlene Martin, Special to The Inquirer
The juniors and seniors in Alice Olszewski's advanced vertebrate anatomy class at Cherry Hill High School West had just finished dissecting a cat when their teacher decided that a break was in order. So the students settled back in their chairs and paid a short visit - in spirit - to the valley of the Pharaohs in ancient Egypt. Olszewski passed around photographs depicting the interiors of the Pharaohs' richly carved and painted tombs. She showed them a picture of a ferryboat that crosses the Nile each day from Luxor to ancient Thebes.
NEWS
November 19, 1997 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Monday's bloody attack on tourists at the ancient tombs of Luxor was actually an attempt to take hostages in order to secure the release of a sheik imprisoned in the United States for planning the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, according to a letter faxed yesterday to news agencies here. The letter purported to be from the Gama'a al-Islamiya, Egypt's deadliest terrorist group, and sources here who examined the letter said it appeared to be authentic. The letter said the intent of the attack was to free Sheik Omar Abdel-Rahman, 59, spiritual leader of the group, who was convicted in 1995 for plotting terrorist attacks in New York and is serving a life sentence in Springfield, Mo. In the aftermath of Egypt's bloodiest tourist massacre ever, President Hosni Mubarak fired his interior minister, Hassan el-Alfy, who was responsible for what Mubarak called "a joke" of a preventive security plan in Luxor.
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NEWS
June 17, 2013
Czech premier says he'll resign PRAGUE - Czech Prime Minister Petr Necas announced Sunday that he will resign over a spy and bribery scandal involving his government. Necas said he also will quit Monday as chairman of his conservative Civic Democratic Party. He has been under pressure to quit since police conducted raids all across the country last week and arrested eight people, including Necas' closest aide and the head of his office, Jana Nagyova. She was charged with ordering a military intelligence agency to spy on three people, including Necas' estranged wife.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Maggie Michael, Associated Press
LUXOR, Egypt - The terror lasted less than two minutes: Smoke poured from a hot-air balloon carrying sightseers on a sunrise flight over the ancient city of Luxor, it burst in a flash of flame, and then plummeted about 1,000 feet to earth. A farmer watched helplessly as tourists trying to escape the blazing gondola leaped to their deaths. Nineteen people were killed Tuesday in what was likely the deadliest hot-air-ballooning accident on record. A British tourist and the Egyptian pilot, who was badly burned, were the sole survivors.
TRAVEL
July 17, 2011 | By Aimee Johnson, For The Inquirer
In January, antigovernment demonstrations erupted in Egypt and other African nations. As the world watched the young protesters take over Tahrir Square and clash with security forces, my three sisters and I watched our well-planned trip to the ancient wonders of the Nile evaporate. By February, the U.S. government had issued a travel advisory, and our British-based tour group started canceling tours. It appeared that our trip, planned for years, would have to wait. But in March, we got the go-ahead.
TRAVEL
March 20, 2011 | By Bill Ordine, For The Inquirer
Vacation at one Las Vegas casino-hotel and get to experience five other resorts - or at least some of their amenities - all for the same price. That's the pitch the MGM Resorts group of gambling halls is making as Vegas marketers try to come up with novel ways to attract tourists. As part of MGM Resorts' current promotion, six of the company's Vegas hotels clustered at the south end of the Strip - the MGM Grand, Mandalay Bay, Monte Carlo, New York-New York, Luxor, and Excalibur - are offering Spring Break Escape packages that bundle food, drink, and spa goodies until the end of April.
NEWS
December 7, 1997 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
The terrorist killings of 58 tourists at Luxor on Nov. 17 and State Department warnings that U.S. citizens should avoid travel to that part of Egypt at least through Feb. 17 have prompted many tour operators to cancel package tours to Egypt. The cancellations arise not only because many tourists want to heed the warning, but also because companies fear liability if clients run into problems. Big companies such as Tauck Tours, which had a new Egypt-Israel cruise tour in the works, and General Tours have canceled their trips for the near future, according to Travel Weekly.
NEWS
November 19, 1997 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Monday's bloody attack on tourists at the ancient tombs of Luxor was actually an attempt to take hostages in order to secure the release of a sheik imprisoned in the United States for planning the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, according to a letter faxed yesterday to news agencies here. The letter purported to be from the Gama'a al-Islamiya, Egypt's deadliest terrorist group, and sources here who examined the letter said it appeared to be authentic. The letter said the intent of the attack was to free Sheik Omar Abdel-Rahman, 59, spiritual leader of the group, who was convicted in 1995 for plotting terrorist attacks in New York and is serving a life sentence in Springfield, Mo. In the aftermath of Egypt's bloodiest tourist massacre ever, President Hosni Mubarak fired his interior minister, Hassan el-Alfy, who was responsible for what Mubarak called "a joke" of a preventive security plan in Luxor.
NEWS
November 18, 1997 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gunmen disguised as policemen yesterday raked a crowd of foreign sightseers with machine-gun fire as they scurried for cover into the ancient tombs of the pharaohs in Luxor. At least 70 people died in the attack and ensuing gun battle, police said. It was by far the worst attack in a five-year insurgency that has targeted tourist sites in Egypt. The government blamed the attack on members of the Gama'a al-Islamiya, or Islamic Group, which aspires to replace Egypt's secular government with an Islamic regime.
NEWS
January 19, 1997 | By Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
My first trip to Egypt started with a promise - or, more accurately, a series of repeated promises. A friend was working in Cairo. Offhandedly, I made a vague promise to visit - sometime. But the promise took on such a life of its own that eventually there was no way to back out. Yes, I was apprehensive. I didn't speak Arabic, and Egypt is very far from Philadelphia. Add to that the incidents of Muslim extremists killing European tourists, and I was concerned. But that 1995 trip was fabulous.
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