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Lyme Disease

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NEWS
March 17, 1992 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ticks beware! The Montgomery County Health Department yesterday announced a seven-point initiative to attack Lyme disease. "This plan represents Montgomery County's efforts to launch an all-out offensive against Lyme disease," said health director Gary Gurian during a Board of Health meeting in Norristown. Hailed by local Lyme disease activists, the plan calls for epidemiological, environmental and educational programs. "It's pretty comprehensive," said Neil Goldstein, co-founder of the Lyme Project, a group that promotes awareness of the disease.
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | For The Inquirer / J. SCOTT LYONS
The Montgomery County Health Department is warning park visitors about the presence of deer ticks, which carry Lyme disease. Signs are posted in Lorimer Park in Abington, Valley Forge National Historical Park and Fort Washington State Park.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The incidence of Lyme disease in Montgomery County this year is expected to be at least 50 percent higher than last year, according to state health officials and a local Lyme disease watchdog group. Meanwhile, the reported incidence of rabies in the state so far this year is unchanged. State epidemiologist Dr. Bobby Jones said there was no way to predict what the figures would be by the end of the year. Montgomery County, which had the highest reported number of rabies cases last year, 83, has 10 cases so far this year.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | By Bridgett M. Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rachel Longstaff wants the world to know about Lyme disease. The Huntingdon Valley resident recently helped draft a letter to local, state and federal officials to request that they educate residents and doctors about the strange disease spread by tiny deer ticks that live in lawns and wooded areas. The letter was signed by 50 of Longstaff's neighbors and sent to the state Department of Health, the Bryn Athyn Board of Health, the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, state Rep. Roy Cornell, state Sen. Stuart Greenleaf and Huntingdon Valley officials.
NEWS
June 28, 1994 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a possible breakthrough in the diagnosis of Lyme disease, immunologists have pinpointed an antibody that the body produces within days of being exposed to the Lyme bacteria. The discovery could lead to a test that would quickly prove whether someone actually had the disease. Once diagnosed, the disease can usually be cured with antibiotics. This discovery "could lead more rapidly to effective treatment," said Steven E. Schutzer, an immunologist at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey who led the research team.
NEWS
June 25, 1988 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Amy Jones moved to Huntingdon Valley in eastern Montgomery County last June, she looked forward to frolicking with her children on the grassy lawn of her tree-shaded back yard. A year later, however, her attention is focused not on recreation, but upon a strange disease spread by tiny deer ticks that has reached epidemic proportions along her street, Papermill Road. Both she and her daughters, Alanna and Adena, have suffered from the crimson rashes and flu-like symptoms of Lyme disease, an infectious ailment that can cause serious heart, nerve and arthritic disorders if not properly treated.
NEWS
May 31, 1990 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Lyme disease is spreading in Pennsylvania, especially in Delaware and Montgomery Counties, and the state Department of Agriculture has funded a three-year research project to find out where the sometimes-crippling illness is headed. "It is a major disease of concern," said Thomas Bast, an entomologist with the state Bureau of Forestry. A research team from Pennsylvania State University received $47,945 in January to identify areas infested by Ixodes dammini, the deer tick, said Karl Valley, an entomologist with the Agriculture Department.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a long day of hair, makeup, and corsages - all that goes with prom - Kelly Simmons was still beaming when she posed with her two high school daughters. But when she pulled off her scarf for the camera, unaware of the red bump beneath, the other parents grimaced. "Of all the people in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, everyone thought I would be the last to have Lyme disease," said Simmons, a novelist who spends most of her time indoors. Nationally, Lyme disease is most rampant in parts of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, because of environments suited for the disease-transmitting ticks.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Christopher Shea, Special to The Inquirer
Even as Pennsylvania conditionally approved a canine vaccine for Lyme disease, an encouraging development for dog owners, state and local officials last week said that cases reported in humans are running roughly at or above the same high rate of last year. Preliminary figures compiled in Reading by the southeast district office of the State Department of Health and the independent department in Chester County show increases in cases in the three Main Line counties. Montgomery County, for example, has reported 106 cases of Lyme disease this year.
NEWS
December 25, 1991 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The few empty corners of Cindy Hodgson's life were thoroughly filled last summer. She got Lyme disease. First there was a 105-degree fever. Then the Ardmore mother of two, athlete and graphics designer suffered facial paralysis, crippling arthritic pain and, finally, a complete loss of energy. It was different for Edward Angelo, 45, a Malvern real estate investor, bodybuilder and former professional singer. Lyme disease paralyzed his voice box and gave him a three-week headache so severe he felt like putting a power drill to his skull.
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NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Dr. Joseph Hassey, For The Inquirer
Bob was 70 when he developed persistent fever, night sweats, and weight loss. He had recently been admitted to a hospital for evaluation. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed an abnormality of the spleen that was concerning for a lymphoma. He then underwent surgical removal of his spleen. No malignancy was found. He continued to have fever for several more weeks and was sent to me for further evaluation. He had no significant past medical history. He was married and driving a shuttle bus for a car dealership.
NEWS
December 29, 2013 | By Dr. Bradley Johnson, For The Inquirer
A 65-year-old avid gardener worked hard every summer maintaining his wooded property in rural New Jersey. He would spend hours outdoors, trimming trees and bushes, mulching and landscaping, and invariably would be bitten by insects. He considered that a small price to pay for the great pleasure of communing with nature. He also had grown accustomed to aches and pains after a strenuous day in the yard. This year, however, he felt more uncomfortable than usual. After several weeks of treating himself with a buffet of over-the-counter pain remedies, he became concerned when he developed night sweats and increasing fatigue.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Catie Hamilton and Dr. John Stern, For The Inquirer
She was supposed to be on her way to a neon-lit chapel where an Elvis impersonator waited to officiate at her wedding. Instead, the 27-year-old woman sat in a thin hospital gown on an examining table in a cold emergency room, anxiously waiting for news. A week before, she had gone to see her primary physician. She had been dealing with a series of strange symptoms over the summer. A curious, maddening itch. Achy joints from time to time. Vicious headaches that she supposed were like migraines, although she had never had them before.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Stanley Plotkin, 81, creator of the rubella vaccine, hopes another vaccine can be made to vanquish Lyme disease. Plotkin's call for a new Lyme disease vaccine is also personal. In an op-ed piece for the New York Times this summer, Plotkin, a Doylestown resident and professor of pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania, described how in 2005, his son, Alec, was felled with a heart ailment caused by Lyme. Although Alec has since recovered, Plotkin urged patients and physicians to contact the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and encourage the agency to make a Lyme vaccine a top priority.
NEWS
October 6, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For Kathy Spreen, Lyme disease is a family affair. The trouble for her West Chester family started with her husband, who complained of fatigue and shoulder pain. Diagnosed with Lyme, he was treated with antibiotics and cured. About a year later, suffering with fatigue and joint pain, Spreen was treated twice for Lyme, which led to arthroscopic surgery and an eventual knee replacement. But when her 20-year old son Chris was rushed to the emergency room with a fever near 106 degrees and lapsing in and out of consciousness, she felt helpless.
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Curtis Skinner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three possible cases of a potentially serious but treatable tick-borne illness with symptoms similar to Lyme disease have been reported in Chester County. A county spokeswoman, Rebecca Brain, confirmed that the possible cases of babesiosis are under investigation but would provide no additional details. A diagnosis usually depends on blood tests. Eight cases - all in eastern Pennsylvania, including one in Chester County in July - have been confirmed statewide this year, a state Health Department spokeswoman said.
NEWS
August 14, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
CHESTER COUNTY health officials are investigating three reported cases of a rare, sometimes fatal tick-borne disease, including one person in serious condition. The disease is called babesiosis, an infection caused by microscopic parasites that infect red blood cells. Last year, 11 cases were confirmed in Pennsylvania, none fatal. There have been no confirmed cases this year. One of the reported cases this year is at Brandywine Hospital, according to a physician who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of privacy laws.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a long day of hair, makeup, and corsages - all that goes with prom - Kelly Simmons was still beaming when she posed with her two high school daughters. But when she pulled off her scarf for the camera, unaware of the red bump beneath, the other parents grimaced. "Of all the people in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, everyone thought I would be the last to have Lyme disease," said Simmons, a novelist who spends most of her time indoors. Nationally, Lyme disease is most rampant in parts of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, because of environments suited for the disease-transmitting ticks.
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
The deer population of Lower Merion Township dropped 30 percent from 2008 to 2012, but according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture survey, it's still four times higher than recommended for the suburban area. White-tailed deer have been problematic in the township for decades, causing car crashes, degrading forest land, and increasing the risk of Lyme disease. The population density dropped from 58 deer per square mile in 2008 to 40.5 in 2012 - a conservative estimate, according to the USDA.
NEWS
July 1, 2013
WHY, in a room full of people, will a cat invariably make a beeline to the one person in the room who hates or is allergic to cats? Cats don't like eye contact from strangers - they find it intimidating. When a friendly cat wanders into a room, he'll notice that all the people who like cats are looking at him. So he heads for the one who he thinks is being polite - the person who isn't looking at him. It's just a little bit of cross-species miscommunication. * Natura Pet Products has again recalled products across much of its dry-food brand line for salmonella concerns.
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