CollectionsLymph Nodes
IN THE NEWS

Lymph Nodes

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
March 26, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
CINCINNATI REDS third-base coach Mark Berry has been diagnosed with cancer on his tonsils and neck lymph nodes. Berry, 50, traveled from Arizona to Cincinnati on Wednesday to have a biopsy of his lymph nodes, which was positive. "I first noticed in early December. My tonsils swelled up," Berry said. "I had like a cold or a flu and I thought it was just that. " The doctors tested Berry from the waist up to make sure the disease hadn't spread. They told him it was isolated in his lymph nodes, leaving two treatment options.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2000 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Princeton biotech firm, Cytogen Corp., said yesterday it would acquire Advanced Magnetics Inc., of Cambridge, Mass., for $60 million. The companies, which specialize in cancer diagnostics, said the deal would give Cytogen $19.5 million in cash, a Massachusetts manufacturing plant, and two promising pharmaceuticals under development at Advanced Magnetics that would be marketed by Cytogen's 28-person salesforce. Cytogen sells products that are used with magnetic resonance imaging technology to detect prostate, ovarian and colorectal cancers.
NEWS
August 17, 2000 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
Cancer expert Dr. Burton Eisenberg, chairman of the department of surgical oncology at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, was asked about melanoma. Q: What makes melanoma potentially deadly? A: "The problem we face with melanoma is that sometimes, depending on the stage of the disease, it can be fairly aggressive and can metastasize [spread] to the lymph nodes and other organs in the body," Eisenberg said. Q: What's Sen. John McCain's risk of death? A: "My suspicion is that he's had a history of this, and his doctors have been following him pretty closely and given him a thorough dermatological exam every couple of years, and unless they've been neglectful they've picked it up pretty early," Eisenberg said.
NEWS
October 20, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Nancy Reagan, who "feels wonderful" just days after breast-cancer surgery, yesterday got a get-well basket of cookies and a kiss from President Reagan as she continued a rapid recovery, her press secretary said. "She'll be coming home soon," Reagan called out to reporters as he left the White House for his fourth visit to Bethesda Naval Medical Center in nearby Maryland. The President's physician, John Hutton, issued a statement earlier in the day saying Nancy Reagan's recovery from surgery Saturday "is continuing very well and she feels wonderful.
SPORTS
March 26, 2013
Derek Jeter will likely join Alex Rodriguez, Mark Teixeira and Curtis Granderson on the New York Yankees' star-studded disabled list for the season opener against the Boston Red Sox on April 1. Yankees general manager Brian Cashman says it's "more likely than not" Jeter will start on the DL because of a sore left ankle, still recovering from surgery last October. Eduardo Nunez, known for his bat more than his glove, would fill in at shortstop for the 13-time all-star, who broke the ankle Oct. 13 during the AL Championship Series opener against Detroit and had surgery a week later.
SPORTS
May 28, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Wilson Alvarez tied LaMarr Hoyt's team record by winning his 15th consecutive decision as the host Chicago White Sox defeated Baltimore last night, 3-0. Alvarez (8-0) pitched a six-hitter, struck out six and walked none in his first shutout this season, the third of his career. "I know I'm going to lose someday," Alvarez said. Frank Thomas, celebrating his 26th birthday, went 3-for-4, including a leadoff homer in the eighth, his 18th. In other news: INDIANS: TURNER HAS HODGKIN'S Matt Turner, a relief pitcher who opened the major league season with the Cleveland Indians, has been diagnosed as having Hodgkin's disease.
SPORTS
September 26, 2014 | Staff Report
BENGALS defensive tackle Devon Still was overcome with scores of joyful emotion yesteday. Still took to Instagram to announce his 4-year-old daughter, Leah, had successful cancer surgery at Philadelphia Children's Hosptial of Philadelphia. "After a 5 hour, 50 minute surgery the surgeon was able to remove ALL of her tumor and all of her lymph nodes and her right adrenal gland where it all started from," Still wrote. "Best news I've received in a long time. " Leah Still was was diagnosed with Stage 4 neuroblastoma, a form of pediatric cancer, in June.
SPORTS
March 27, 2001 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Roger Neilson has added a new twist to his wardrobe. "I've been wearing this pressurized panty hose," the former Flyers coach said. "Cost 120 bucks and I have already gone through two. It forces the blood up. " Neilson, a 66-year-old assistant coach with the Senators, must wear the hose after surgery earlier this season that removed a cancerous mole on his right leg. The support hose controls swelling in his leg. The melanoma is Neilson's...
SPORTS
September 2, 2006 | By The Inquirer Staff
Boston Red Sox rookie lefthander Jon Lester has a form of lymphoma and will start cancer treatment in the coming week, the team announced yesterday. Enlarged lymph nodes were identified when Lester, 22, was tested to determine the cause of back pain that sent him to the disabled list on Monday. The club said he has a treatable form of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Lester, from Tacoma, Wash., was Boston's first pick in the 2002 draft. Pitcher Brad Radke has a stress fracture in his right shoulder, an injury Minnesota officials say doesn't necessarily end his season.
NEWS
May 22, 1996 | By Susan FitzGerald and Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Most women with highly curable, early-stage ovarian cancer are not meticulously checked during surgery to see if the disease has spread - a lapse that could increase their chances of dying, according to a new National Cancer Institute study. The study also found that women frequently are not given the state-of-the-art chemotherapy treatments recommended for ovarian cancer, especially if they are 65 or older and have advanced disease. The findings are an indication that even as researchers develop new and more effective treatments for various cancers, many people do not get the standard of care already available.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Dr. Lucy E. Hornstein, For The Inquirer
Ho-hum, I thought. Another patient with a swollen lymph node in her neck. I see these day in and day out, and they are seldom of concern. Most people worry it's a sign of cancer. That's possible. But malignant nodes are usually stony hard, fixed to the skin or underlying structures, and generally not painful. Lymph nodes mainly act as filtering stations for the immune system to protect us from microbial invaders, so the ones in the neck usually enlarge and get sore during upper respiratory infections.
SPORTS
September 26, 2014 | Staff Report
BENGALS defensive tackle Devon Still was overcome with scores of joyful emotion yesteday. Still took to Instagram to announce his 4-year-old daughter, Leah, had successful cancer surgery at Philadelphia Children's Hosptial of Philadelphia. "After a 5 hour, 50 minute surgery the surgeon was able to remove ALL of her tumor and all of her lymph nodes and her right adrenal gland where it all started from," Still wrote. "Best news I've received in a long time. " Leah Still was was diagnosed with Stage 4 neuroblastoma, a form of pediatric cancer, in June.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Farrell got chemotherapy on a Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and then ran the Broad Street Run on a Sunday. He has tripped over a trolley track at the four-mile mark, gashed his knee, and finished. In fact, Farrell, 66, of Glenolden, Delaware County, has run the Broad Street Run 34 times, every time, and Sunday will be his 35th - one of only six people to have run each one since it began in 1980. And though the 10-mile course from North Philadelphia to South this Sunday will be lined with fans, he has never heard one cheer.
SPORTS
March 18, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Phillies Hall of Fame third baseman Mike Schmidt revealed Sunday that he had been diagnosed with stage-3 melanoma last summer. Though Schmidt said that he is now cancer-free, the melanoma forced him to undergo radiation and chemotherapy treatments and surgery to remove his lymph nodes. "I'm a lucky man," he said outside the team's training complex. Schmidt, 64, who will join the Phillies' TV broadcast team on Comcast SportsNet for 13 Sunday home games this season, had noticed a discolored blotch of skin on his hand one day in August and, on the spur of the moment, decided to visit his dermatologist.
SPORTS
March 26, 2013
Derek Jeter will likely join Alex Rodriguez, Mark Teixeira and Curtis Granderson on the New York Yankees' star-studded disabled list for the season opener against the Boston Red Sox on April 1. Yankees general manager Brian Cashman says it's "more likely than not" Jeter will start on the DL because of a sore left ankle, still recovering from surgery last October. Eduardo Nunez, known for his bat more than his glove, would fill in at shortstop for the 13-time all-star, who broke the ankle Oct. 13 during the AL Championship Series opener against Detroit and had surgery a week later.
SPORTS
March 26, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
CINCINNATI REDS third-base coach Mark Berry has been diagnosed with cancer on his tonsils and neck lymph nodes. Berry, 50, traveled from Arizona to Cincinnati on Wednesday to have a biopsy of his lymph nodes, which was positive. "I first noticed in early December. My tonsils swelled up," Berry said. "I had like a cold or a flu and I thought it was just that. " The doctors tested Berry from the waist up to make sure the disease hadn't spread. They told him it was isolated in his lymph nodes, leaving two treatment options.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | By Rosy Weiser, Santa Cruz Sentinel
SOQUEL, Calif. - Boulder Creek Collective founder Marc Whitehill, a former nurse, has seen a lot of people come through his doors seeking medical marijuana, enough that he thinks he has a pretty clear idea of the patient demographic at most local dispensaries. He estimates 60 percent are 40 or older and use cannabis "to avoid taking much harsher pharmaceutical alternatives to treat nausea, sleeplessness, anxiety and aches and pains," he said. They use the medicine instead of resorting to common prescription painkillers and tranquilizers.
SPORTS
December 11, 2011 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
The text message from Jeremy Maclin told David Culley that something was very wrong. "The text said, 'Coach, I'm very concerned about my health.' Period. Nothing else was there," recalled Culley, the Eagles wide receivers coach. "Although you can't feel a text, I felt just from what he said to me, there's something seriously wrong with him. " The confidence Culley knew so well was missing. By the time Maclin sent that message, he was well into a harrowing summer that involved no fewer than six tests for cancer, hours spent with needles inserted into his chest and back, and a frustrating lack of answers.
NEWS
October 17, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
There's a scene in Kerri Conner's children's book that's ripped from real, raw life. By the third chemo treatment, her thick, black hair had started coming out in clumps, so she asked her father to shave her head with his clippers. That afternoon in the summer of 2008, she drove to the Meadowlane Montessori School in Jenkintown for pickup, and the thought came to mind that her daughter, 2 1/2-year-old Madison, would see her and scream. But when the girl ran to her, she said, "Mommy, I like your haircut.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2010
A NITA T. Conner and her daughter Kerri Marie have shared practically everything. Both were cheerleaders when they attended Abington High School. They pledged the same sorority in college and each went on to become a certified public accountant. They work together and live in the same Elkins Park neighborhood. And they were both diagnosed with breast cancer on April 16, 10 years apart. Mom was diagnosed in 1998; daughter in 2008. This weekend, the mother-daughter duo again will be in lockstep as they host their annual event, Praise Is the Cure: A Weekend of Hope and Healing, during which they'll bus about 200 homeless-shelter residents to the Mount Airy Church of God in Christ for free breast-cancer screenings.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|