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Macao

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NEWS
December 6, 1987 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twenty-four hours a day, the tacky basement casino at the Lisboa Hotel is elbow to elbow with gamblers who have lost track of night and day. At other hotels it is the same: Gambling is the preoccupation of the place. At some tables the click of chips is the only sound. Sometimes there is the yawning and gossiping of the trim Chinese casino staff, punctuated by shrill cries of glee or consternation from the players. Here, on this tiny crowded jut of land off communist China, there is a place for the wealthy and reckless to play.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2005 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Adrift in Macao is funny in more than one sense of the word. The musical spoof of film noir movies that the Philadelphia Theatre Company is premiering at Plays & Players Theatre is indeed humorous. The book and lyrics by Christopher Durang as presented by this excellent cast are constantly amusing and often, for many in the audience on opening night, laugh-out-loud funny. But Adrift in Macao is also funny in the sense that there is something not quite right about it. The show has a bothersome insubstantial quality.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Song of the Exile, a haunting and deeply felt work from highly regarded Hong Kong filmmaker Ann Hui, deals in a very original way with estrangement in a strange land. Among European and American directors, it has become something of a cliche to plunk an innocent down in an alien culture and use his or her experiences as a mirror that reflects badly on the society in question. Hui, whose best- known film is Boat People, takes essentially the same predicament - in an especially abrupt collision of values and customs - and turns it inward instead of outward.
NEWS
January 23, 1991 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
As a reward for testifying against his traveling companion in a $25 million heroin smuggling case, an electrical engineer from Hong Kong yesterday was given only a three-year prison term by a federal judge in Philadelphia. Tough federal sentencing guidelines called for the defendant, Hin Ping Lo, 40, to be jailed for at least 12 years without chance of parole. But U.S. District Judge Robert S. Gawthrop agreed with federal prosecutors who recommended leniency. Lo's testimony was of the "utmost value" in convicting Tat Man Ho, a reputed member of a Hong Kong crime family, Assistant U.S. Attorney Linwood C. Wright Jr. told the judge.
NEWS
November 20, 1990 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Hin Ping Lo, an electrical engineer and export-import man from Hong Kong, swore the 18 pounds of near-pure "China-white" heroin belonged to Tat Man Ho, his traveling companion. Ho, operator of a San Francisco Bay-area Chinese gambling parlor, contended through his attorney that the heroin, possibly the largest batch ever seized in Philadelphia and said to be worth up to $25 million, belonged to Lo. The job of sorting out the finger-pointing rested with a U.S. District Court jury, which, after more than six hours of deliberations, yesterday convicted Ho of conspiracy to possess and possession of the heroin.
NEWS
January 15, 1994 | By GEORGE F. WILL
In the mystery novel Trent's Last Case, there is a scene in Simpson's restaurant in London, where Trent asks his companion to speak softly when ordering a glass of milk in that posh place because the head waiter has a weak heart. Let us hope that Americans with hearts as weak as that head waiter's did not notice their government's behavior last week. The Clinton administration faced a crucial decision concerning a Communist regime in Asia: What to do about North Korea making a mockery of treaty obligations, en route to becoming a nuclear power?
NEWS
August 30, 2007
The Aug. 21 commentary, "Early lesson in bigotry" by Paul Von Blum, suggests that developer William Levitt, having refused to sell homes to blacks, was the reason why there was no diversity in Levittown in 1957. This, in my opinion, is misdirected racism. The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) had adopted a racist policy that made it all but impossible for blacks to move into a Levittown development. The FHA's 1934 underwriting manual, used to evaluate communities suitable for mortgage insurance, stated, "if a neighborhood is to retain stability, it is necessary that properties shall continue to be occupied by the same social and racial classes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1986 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (The Associated Press, United Press International, the New York Daily News, and the New York Times also contributed to this report.)
Vladimir Horowitz, one of the century's greatest pianists, announced that he would return to his native Soviet Union for two concerts in the spring, reneging on a promise never to return. "Before I die, I want to see the country in which I was born," Horowitz, 81, said Thursday in New York. "But I didn't want to go home as a tourist. I wanted to play. " His first concert is scheduled April 20 at Moscow's Bolshoi Theater and the second a week later in Leningrad's Shostakovich Hall.
NEWS
October 24, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The man with the most entrances at the Merriam Theater at last night's Barrymore Awards had to be the Arden Theatre Company's producing artistic director, Terrence J. Nolen. Besides making history at the 12th annual Barrymores for being the first to win two directing awards the same night - one for a play, the other for a musical - his oft-honored shows brought him onstage to accept awards with and for colleagues. The Nolen musical was the Arden's realistic look at small-town America, Winesburg, Ohio - nicknamed "the anti-Music Man" - which won five awards, including best musical, music direction by Thomas Murray, leading actor for Brian Hissong, and original music for Andre Pluess and Ben Sussman.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1986 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (The Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters, USA Today and the New York Times also contributed to this report.)
Sylvester Stallone and Sally Field have been named man and woman of the year by Harvard's Hasty Pudding Theatricals, the country's oldest dramatic group. Field, a two-time Oscar winner for Norma Rae and Places in the Heart, will pick up her award Feb. 11 after a parade through the university in Cambridge, Mass. Stallone will get his a week later, before the opening of the club's 138th annual production, Between the Sheiks. Field was cited as "a diverse and talented actress," and Stallone for strengthening "the bond between himself and the American public" with his Rambo character.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 30, 2007
The Aug. 21 commentary, "Early lesson in bigotry" by Paul Von Blum, suggests that developer William Levitt, having refused to sell homes to blacks, was the reason why there was no diversity in Levittown in 1957. This, in my opinion, is misdirected racism. The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) had adopted a racist policy that made it all but impossible for blacks to move into a Levittown development. The FHA's 1934 underwriting manual, used to evaluate communities suitable for mortgage insurance, stated, "if a neighborhood is to retain stability, it is necessary that properties shall continue to be occupied by the same social and racial classes.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2007 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Macao, the former Portuguese enclave on the southeastern tip of China, took a giant step toward becoming the Las Vegas of Asia with yesterday's opening of the world's biggest casino. The $2.4 billion Venetian Macao Resort Hotel is the centerpiece of a $12 billion "integrated resort" development - the first Las Vegas-style megacasino on a sliver of reclaimed land called the Cotai Strip. "It is all systems go," said Ray Dougherty, a West Philadelphia native and director of casino operations for the Venetian Macao.
NEWS
August 19, 2007 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When America's largest casino companies looked at the world's emerging gambling scene, it wasn't Pennsylvania where they placed their biggest bets. Instead, MGM Mirage Inc. and Wynn Resorts Ltd. are pouring money into Macao, a tiny peninsula on the southeastern tip of China. And while the Las Vegas Sands Corp. is spending $600 million on Bethworks Casino in Bethlehem, Pa., it's plunking down $12 billion in Macao. Five years ago, Macao was a seedy backwater town about one-eighth the area of Philadelphia, with just one casino operator.
NEWS
October 24, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The man with the most entrances at the Merriam Theater at last night's Barrymore Awards had to be the Arden Theatre Company's producing artistic director, Terrence J. Nolen. Besides making history at the 12th annual Barrymores for being the first to win two directing awards the same night - one for a play, the other for a musical - his oft-honored shows brought him onstage to accept awards with and for colleagues. The Nolen musical was the Arden's realistic look at small-town America, Winesburg, Ohio - nicknamed "the anti-Music Man" - which won five awards, including best musical, music direction by Thomas Murray, leading actor for Brian Hissong, and original music for Andre Pluess and Ben Sussman.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2005 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Adrift in Macao is funny in more than one sense of the word. The musical spoof of film noir movies that the Philadelphia Theatre Company is premiering at Plays & Players Theatre is indeed humorous. The book and lyrics by Christopher Durang as presented by this excellent cast are constantly amusing and often, for many in the audience on opening night, laugh-out-loud funny. But Adrift in Macao is also funny in the sense that there is something not quite right about it. The show has a bothersome insubstantial quality.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2005 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In his years in Catholic high school in northern New Jersey, Christopher Durang was never the class clown. But by the time he got to the Yale School of Drama, he had audiences laughing. For his young-unknown classmate Meryl Streep, Durang and fellow playwright Albert Innaurato penned a comedy they titled The Idiots Karamazov. Streep was cast as a crabby 80-year-old translator of classic Russian novels. "She did this educated British accent and looked like Margaret Hamilton [the Wicked Witch in the Wizard of Oz]
NEWS
September 26, 1999 | By Jacques deLisle
Fifty years ago Oct. 1, Mao Zedong stood atop Tiananmen Square and proclaimed the founding of the People's Republic of China. From that spot, Mao's portrait now gazes over the symbolic center of a much-changed country. When China's leaders gather beside the chairman's likeness for the gala marking a half-century of communist rule, they will take pride in China's transformation. Yet they also surely will feel uneasy. Successes of the PRC era seem endangered by challenges unimaginable a generation ago. Since Mao's announcement, the goals of national unity and integration have been achieved.
NEWS
March 2, 1997 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like myriad moneymakers in this energized city of cash and dreams, Sze Chi Ching turned nothing in his pockets into millions in the bank. Sze, 60, left his hometown in China's Fujian province for Hong Kong four decades ago. He planned to make a stopover in Hong Kong on his way to Manila to find work. He never left. From his hand-to-mouth days as a trader selling canned food, Sze now rules a business empire with nine factories across the border, 2,000 workers, an industrial park in Fujian, as well as office buildings and apartments in coastal cities.
NEWS
January 31, 1997
The reunification of China has a long way to go Trudy Rubin's "Ending the 'one China' fantasy" (Jan. 24) explains well the standoff between the authoritarian People's Republic of China and the democratic Republic of China, commonly known as Taiwan. Recognizing the principle of "one China, but not now," Taiwan, as well as the majority of its people, looks forward to a future China reunified under freedom, democracy and equitable prosperity. In this interest, Taiwan has established unification guidelines premised on the concept of a temporarily divided China, with the two equal governments first building mutual trust through people-to-people contact and gradually moving to political issues.
NEWS
December 27, 1994
Now that Christmas is over, it's our unfortunate task to have to remind you why most of our toys, trinkets and baubles came to us so inexpensively this year, relatively speaking. Hint: It wasn't Santa Claus. It was because underpaid, overworked foreign workers, employed by huge manufacturing concerns - increasingly unfettered in the global, free-trade economy - worked long hours under wretched conditions to provide you with cheap goods. If you want to test this theory, just take a minute to examine some of the stuff you have stashed under your tree.
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