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Macaroni

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FOOD
April 8, 1987 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Read the recent letter concerning the leftover macaroni salad made with mayonnaise. The reader warmed the dish up, and her mayonnaise-hating husband loved it. Everyone has always raved over the macaroni and cheese casserole that I've made for years. I usually never reveal the secret to them unless they insist on the recipe, which includes the addition of 1/2 cup of mayonnaise; it truly enhances the flavor. When I taste other macaroni and cheese dishes without the mayonnaise, it always seems something is missing.
FOOD
February 26, 1992 | By Andrew Schloss, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Some foods are so simple in their construction, so ordinary in their form and so central to our collective culinary unconscious that we come to resent having to cook them. Instead we leave the cooking to the big food manufacturers, and in so doing we lose the knowledge that marinara sauce was not born in a jar, nor does macaroni and cheese simply appear full-blown in its own oven-to-table microwaveable container. By bowing to corporate chefs to cook our favorite dishes we relegate them to the world of commodities.
FOOD
March 17, 1999 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Food Editor
In our search for truly comforting mac and cheese, the one worth-the-effort recipe that can hold its own against the conven-ience/cost/satisfaction standard set by Kraft's, we zeroed in on what the food mags and publishing industry are touting. And the winner is? For absolute fuzzy-slipper comfort, Patti LaBelle's five-cheese extravaganza. But Martha Stewart's creamy uptown version, calling for Gruyere and white cheddar, came in a surprising second. The Blue Ribbon country version relies on milk and American cheese and won kid semi-approval.
FOOD
February 24, 1991 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
The 1990s clearly are going to be one of those decades in which informal entertaining will be chic. Mashed potatoes and pot roast will be as suitable for company as tuna carpaccio with truffled oil. Nevertheless, I would have thought there'd be a line drawn somewhere, and that the somewhere would probably be macaroni and cheese. Filling and flavorful though it may be, and rather nice looking, too, when you come to think of it, this staple, child-pleasing casserole is generally seen as beyond informal.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | By Fen Montaigne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dozens of harried customers were lined up in a neighborhood grocery store in the center of the capital yesterday, buying up every piece of pasta in sight. "Girls! The vermicelli is running out!" hollered a shop assistant, warning two cashiers to quit selling coupons for the noodles she was furiously scooping into paper bags. Only a few days before, pasta, flour and kasha - a common barley cereal - were readily available in Moscow shops. Indeed, they were among the few foods not in short supply here.
FOOD
January 28, 2001 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Familiar, filling and satisfying, macaroni and cheese ranks high on the comfort-food scale. Though the pasta tubes known as macaroni were first imported from Italy more than 200 years ago, baking them with cheese sauce became popular in America only in the 19th century. This childhood classic is one of the best-known pasta dishes, appearing regularly on home-style menus. Though meatless, traditional macaroni and cheese is loaded with saturated fat and cholesterol. Cream sauces are full of butter, milk or cream, and other high-fat dairy products.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | Craig LaBan
Most anything tastes good folded into the richness of macaroni and cheese, but in the mushroom mecca of Kennett Square, where the fungus is as fresh as it gets, there is a special irresistibility to a gooey slice of macaroni whose lily-shaped pasta tubes are studded with roasted maitakes, shiitakes, and oyster mushrooms. Add an indulgent Mornay sauce with good cheddar and gruyère, plus a little spark of Dijon mustard, and it is almost as if Talula's Table fused the macaroni casserole with a particularly sublime cream of mushroom soup, topped, of course, with crunchy garlic bread crumbs.
FOOD
February 1, 1989 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Meatless pasta dishes don't have to be high in fat and calories. Traditionally, they get their protein from eggs and cheese instead of meat - baked macaroni and cheese, for example. A heavy combination of high-fat hard cheeses with lots of eggs and milk (or cream) can add up to a double dose of excess calories and cholesterol. So we go beyond "macaroni and cheese" with light ideas for main-course pasta dishes without added meat, poultry or fish. This dish can be made with a no- cholesterol egg substitute if you prefer: BAKED MACARONI WITH CHEDDAR AND RICOTTA 8 ounces uncooked elbow macaroni 5 eggs (or equivalent egg substitute, thawed)
FOOD
July 16, 1986 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Low in fat, high in protein, canned tuna can help slim down the most savory main courses. Tuna Marinara with Macaroni is only 355 calories a serving, despite a generous helping of pasta. And our mini-pizzas are a slim 150 calories each, even though they include an English muffin base and a topping of melting mozzarella. What's the secret? Be calorie-choosy about ingredients! Use water-packed tuna instead of tuna packed in oil, only 251 calories a 7-ounce can instead of 570. Look for tomato sauce that includes no added oil (read the label)
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | Ashley Primis
1 stick butter 1/4 cup flour 1/2quart heavy cream 3/4 cup Fontina cheese 3/4 cup Gruyere Cheese 3/4 cup Swiss cheese 1 1/2 tablespoons onion powder 1/2 tablespoon cayenne pepper 1 1/2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 1 pound macaroni Salt and pepper to taste   1. To make roux, melt one stick of butter in a pan over medium-high heat. Add flour and whisk until combined and color starts to darken; set aside to cool.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
January 8, 2016 | By Ann Rappoport, For The Inquirer
Perhaps you've noticed: If you want to bring people back from the dead, make one of their signature recipes. Preferably from their own handwriting. Granted, these days it's far less efficient to wade through dog-eared binders and recipe-card boxes and much easier to find recipes online. But I recently made Aunt Toots' noodle kugel, and it felt as though I were in her kitchen talking with her. Last year, at the memorial service for a friend, Paula Garvin, a recipe for her plum cake was included on the lovely program.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | Jenny DeHuff, Daily News
Thanksgiving this year with Patti LaBelle promises to be quite the party. Sharing the table at Patti's Wynnewood home will be none other than the Los Angeles YouTube blogger known as James Wright Chanel , whose ode to Patti's Pies, the sweet-potato pie she's selling exclusively at Walmart, have had the desserts flying off store shelves. The video had more than 3.2 million views as of yesterday. "My new friend James Wright took this fierce video and it took my pie over the top, and people are losing their minds over this pie," the famed local songstress told Fox 29. Also at Patti's table will be Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson , of the Roots , who she said has been ribbing her for years about not inviting him over to sample her cooking.
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
THROUGH HER TEARS, Anna Pozzi struggled to read the recipe for her famous baked macaroni and cheese. The dish, a Christmas Eve staple, was her daughter's favorite. But Theresa Pozzi wouldn't be there to enjoy it. Not this Christmas. Not ever. On Tuesday, a truck driver struck and killed the 33-year-old woman as she tried to cross State Road in Holmesburg. The next day, Christmas Eve, despite a heart laden with sorrow, Anna Pozzi, 62, somehow willed herself to get out of bed and make the gooey casserole.
NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
By most measures, the CreekSide Co-op in Elkins Park can be called a runaway success. But the most important metric, revenue, is lagging to such an extent operators fear they won't make it to the one-year mark in November. The store, part of a growing movement of community-owned and -operated grocers, has anchored a revival of the downtown area that includes three new restaurants, a renovated park, and a community development project at the nearby train station. The co-op has attracted 2,150 member households, nearly double the target.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | Craig LaBan
Most anything tastes good folded into the richness of macaroni and cheese, but in the mushroom mecca of Kennett Square, where the fungus is as fresh as it gets, there is a special irresistibility to a gooey slice of macaroni whose lily-shaped pasta tubes are studded with roasted maitakes, shiitakes, and oyster mushrooms. Add an indulgent Mornay sauce with good cheddar and gruyère, plus a little spark of Dijon mustard, and it is almost as if Talula's Table fused the macaroni casserole with a particularly sublime cream of mushroom soup, topped, of course, with crunchy garlic bread crumbs.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | Craig LaBan
For garlic bread crumbs (makes more than needed for recipe): 12-ounce loaf of (sourdough or baguette) day-old bread, sliced. ½ cup garlic oil For mushrooms: 3 cups fresh mixed mushrooms (oysters, maitakes, shiitakes, beech, king oysters) 3 tablespoons olive oil, for roasting mushrooms For macaroni: 5 cups milk ½ large yellow onion, chopped, about 1 cup 2 garlic cloves, smashed with the flat side of a knife, skin left on 4 parsley sprigs 4 fresh oregano or marjoram sprigs 3 fresh thyme sprigs 3 bay leaves 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard Salt and pepper 2 tablespoons softened butter (for buttering dish)
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | Ashley Primis
1 stick butter 1/4 cup flour 1/2quart heavy cream 3/4 cup Fontina cheese 3/4 cup Gruyere Cheese 3/4 cup Swiss cheese 1 1/2 tablespoons onion powder 1/2 tablespoon cayenne pepper 1 1/2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 1 pound macaroni Salt and pepper to taste   1. To make roux, melt one stick of butter in a pan over medium-high heat. Add flour and whisk until combined and color starts to darken; set aside to cool.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2010 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Pasta has been very, very good for the financial health of Philadelphia Macaroni Co. So good that Campbell Soup Co. , a longtime customer, said it agreed to sell an Ohio pasta factory to the family-owned Philadelphia Macaroni. Terms of the transaction, which is expected to close in mid-July, were not disclosed. But Philadelphia Macaroni, which has pasta factories in Warminster; Grand Forks, N.D.; and Spokane, Wash., doesn't intend to operate the German Village Products plant in Wauseon, Ohio.
NEWS
December 31, 2009 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Thousands of state employees, elected officials from Gov. Rendell on down, and guests eat at the glass-enclosed Capitol cafeteria each week. They go for the convenience, the schmoozing, and the ever-popular macaroni and cheese. But little did they know that other diners were living under the green-domed Capitol roof, taking advantage of the cafeteria pantry after hours: mice, untold numbers of them. The discovery the week before Christmas of a rodent infestation and 16 other health-code violations in the cafeteria prompted a flurry of responses: its immediate closing, government agency finger-pointing, and calls for tougher food-safety laws.
FOOD
May 21, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
On the screen set up off center court at the Reading Terminal Market, the last of the Mohicans were having their say Saturday evening, giving accounts of the old days - the tremble in the rafters when trains still ran above, the buckets kept handy to accommodate the leaky roof, razzing one another, albeit gently, about the drinkability of fresh buttermilk. The stars mingled with the assemblage - tuxedoed Domenic Spataro, 92, bent but unbowed, who has cut back to six days a week at the sandwich stand now run by his son; the iconic butcher, Harry Ochs, just turning 80, with 62 years of meat-cutting under his belt; and, among others, Carol and Willman Spawn, customers since their first date here decades before their hair turned gray.
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