CollectionsMacaroons
IN THE NEWS

Macaroons

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By Julie Xie, Inquirer Staff Writer
WYNNEWOOD Seven-year-old Freida Atkins has spent days in her Wynnewood home packaging macaroons to send to Jewish soldiers overseas in time for Passover, though she's allergic to them herself. Freida is also plagued by idiopathic anaphylaxis, a rare, life-threatening disease in which a wide range of substances can trigger severe allergic reactions. But that hasn't stopped her. She is a Girl Scout. Inspired by her family's Chabad Lubavitch background, and driven to add to her growing collection of 18 Girl Scout badges, she packaged and sorted 160 cans filled with macaroons to give to Jewish soldiers in Afghanistan, Kuwait, Germany, and Qatar who are looking for some holiday spirit during Passover, which starts Monday night.
FOOD
September 28, 1994 | By Nick Malgieri, FOR THE INQUIRER
Macaroons - long used both as a confection and as an ingredient in other confections and desserts - probably originated somewhere in the almond-growing areas of Italy. By the middle of the 18th century, macaroons were well-established throughout Western Europe. In fact, several towns and convents in France and Italy were famous for producing them. Though Americans tend to think of macaroons as coconut cookies, most macaroons are really made from almonds or from a combination of almonds and apricot kernels.
FOOD
May 10, 2007
After a career in corporate retail, Barbara Frenzel has opened her own elegant shop in Haddonfield, featuring lovely china, glassware, flatware and linens that you won't find in department stores, including this charming French import from the Gien collection. Mountainous macaroons Moist and chewy, these 3-ounce mounds of shredded coconut have barely enough binder to count as a cookie. Do count them headliners hidden under LeBus' bushel of great breads. Truffles squared Layered dark chocolate with a hint of fudge and milk chocolate flavored with hazelnuts - a combination so creamy and rich that these 1-inch blocks qualify as truffles in the buff.
FOOD
May 6, 2010
  This lovely tray and platter only look like hand-painted ceramics from Marseille. They're actually light and durable, made of melamine. A nice gift for Mom for dinners on the back porch.   Magical macaroons Here's something to serve on that platter - traditional French-style macarons, baked daily at the Garces Trading Company commissary. They're some of the best we've sampled: the egg-white-almond-flour cookies crisp and light; the densely creamy fillings minty (in the green one)
FOOD
July 23, 1986 | By SYBIL FINKS, Special to the Daily News
"How about a cookie?" Now that's a question that speaks hospitality and understanding. It's an offer of something pleasant and sweet, perhaps a break from a tedious day, a child's reward for doing something nice, or a remedy to soothe a hurt. That's a big responsibility for a little cookie. But that's not the end of it. Even when the cookie has grown old, too stale, or too crumbled, it can live another day in another form to tempt and please a whole new batch of nice people. Just crush these leftover cookies, and collect them in a plastic container or jar with a good lid, and when you have a cup or more, you can start to work your magic.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012
What to eat: Your sweet tooth didn't tell your legs to walk to this truck for brussels sprouts and fava beans. It's dessert time. Get your sugar fix, dummy! There's Creme Brûlée ($5), French macaroons ($1.50 or $2) and Crème Fraiche Cheesecake topped with a seasonal fruit ($5). Other desserts are featured throughout the year. Don't miss: The cheesecake. Peach was the fruit this week, but it changes. Try a milk-and-honey macaroon. And the crème brûlée is "torched to order" by Sugar Philly intern Wyatt Earp.
FOOD
July 10, 2002 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
When I dined at Alain Ducasse in New York City two years ago, the waiting list for a table was reportedly 2,000 names long and lunch for two ran more than $540. The posh dining rooms were replete with gilt ceilings, polished black granite walls, designer knives, and several antique pens to choose from in signing the tab. There were little stools just for purses and a sommelier just for the numerous mineral waters. Ducasse's haute cuisine was nice, too. But it wasn't, quite frankly, even remotely worth the money.
FOOD
May 7, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
The preparations for Susanna Goihman's Passover seder began one week early and more than 1,200 miles away. Susanna's mother, Dorothy Goihman, made a batch of crunchy dill pickles at her home in Miami, and prepared and froze two desserts: fluden, a flourless fruit and nut cake, and a flourless chocolate fig cake. Closer to the holiday, her mother made eggplant salad, spicy Moroccan meatballs, potato flan and macaroons. The day before the seder, she packed everything for the flight to Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2010 | By BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
MORE entrepreneurs launched businesses in 2009 than at any other time in the past 14 years, according to the Kauffman Index of Entrepreneurial Activity, a foundation dedicated to American entrepreneurship. Locally, that "when life hands you lemons, make lemonade" attitude translates not just to lemonade, but also to pierogies, cupcakes and all manner of tasty ideas. Here's a look at six enterprising foodies, go-getters who found delicious opportunity in some unexpected places.
NEWS
March 27, 2002 | By Sandra Hurtes
As a single Jewish woman with a strained family relationship, I've spent many Passovers looking for a place to call home, to take part in the seder. In my quest, I've sedered with boyfriends over candlelight, roast chicken, and a token box of matzo; at a yoga center, chanting ommmmm while dipping into the horseradish; at a nondenominational seder at which three hours of prayers preceded the first course (note for non-Jews: seders are all about food); trying to forget the holiday by spacing out at a spa; and last year with cousins I hadn't seen in a long time, whose table was filled with light conversation (no one asked why I'm not married)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By Julie Xie, Inquirer Staff Writer
WYNNEWOOD Seven-year-old Freida Atkins has spent days in her Wynnewood home packaging macaroons to send to Jewish soldiers overseas in time for Passover, though she's allergic to them herself. Freida is also plagued by idiopathic anaphylaxis, a rare, life-threatening disease in which a wide range of substances can trigger severe allergic reactions. But that hasn't stopped her. She is a Girl Scout. Inspired by her family's Chabad Lubavitch background, and driven to add to her growing collection of 18 Girl Scout badges, she packaged and sorted 160 cans filled with macaroons to give to Jewish soldiers in Afghanistan, Kuwait, Germany, and Qatar who are looking for some holiday spirit during Passover, which starts Monday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012
What to eat: Your sweet tooth didn't tell your legs to walk to this truck for brussels sprouts and fava beans. It's dessert time. Get your sugar fix, dummy! There's Creme Brûlée ($5), French macaroons ($1.50 or $2) and Crème Fraiche Cheesecake topped with a seasonal fruit ($5). Other desserts are featured throughout the year. Don't miss: The cheesecake. Peach was the fruit this week, but it changes. Try a milk-and-honey macaroon. And the crème brûlée is "torched to order" by Sugar Philly intern Wyatt Earp.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2010 | By BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
MORE entrepreneurs launched businesses in 2009 than at any other time in the past 14 years, according to the Kauffman Index of Entrepreneurial Activity, a foundation dedicated to American entrepreneurship. Locally, that "when life hands you lemons, make lemonade" attitude translates not just to lemonade, but also to pierogies, cupcakes and all manner of tasty ideas. Here's a look at six enterprising foodies, go-getters who found delicious opportunity in some unexpected places.
FOOD
May 6, 2010
  This lovely tray and platter only look like hand-painted ceramics from Marseille. They're actually light and durable, made of melamine. A nice gift for Mom for dinners on the back porch.   Magical macaroons Here's something to serve on that platter - traditional French-style macarons, baked daily at the Garces Trading Company commissary. They're some of the best we've sampled: the egg-white-almond-flour cookies crisp and light; the densely creamy fillings minty (in the green one)
FOOD
March 11, 2010 | By Jodie Chase, Contra Costa (Calif.) Times
In patisseries across France, delicate sandwich cookies in every color of the rainbow take their place beside elegant eclairs, tarts and other works of pastry art. French macarons - not to be confused with chewy coconut macaroons - are tiny dome-shaped pastry shells filled with ganache, buttercream or fruit mixtures. They're gently crunchy on the outside, light as air and chewy inside. But these days, there's no need to hop a plane to enjoy them. You can find the dainty treats in various pastry shops and in the freezer case at Trader Joe's.
FOOD
May 10, 2007
After a career in corporate retail, Barbara Frenzel has opened her own elegant shop in Haddonfield, featuring lovely china, glassware, flatware and linens that you won't find in department stores, including this charming French import from the Gien collection. Mountainous macaroons Moist and chewy, these 3-ounce mounds of shredded coconut have barely enough binder to count as a cookie. Do count them headliners hidden under LeBus' bushel of great breads. Truffles squared Layered dark chocolate with a hint of fudge and milk chocolate flavored with hazelnuts - a combination so creamy and rich that these 1-inch blocks qualify as truffles in the buff.
FOOD
July 10, 2002 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
When I dined at Alain Ducasse in New York City two years ago, the waiting list for a table was reportedly 2,000 names long and lunch for two ran more than $540. The posh dining rooms were replete with gilt ceilings, polished black granite walls, designer knives, and several antique pens to choose from in signing the tab. There were little stools just for purses and a sommelier just for the numerous mineral waters. Ducasse's haute cuisine was nice, too. But it wasn't, quite frankly, even remotely worth the money.
NEWS
March 27, 2002 | By Sandra Hurtes
As a single Jewish woman with a strained family relationship, I've spent many Passovers looking for a place to call home, to take part in the seder. In my quest, I've sedered with boyfriends over candlelight, roast chicken, and a token box of matzo; at a yoga center, chanting ommmmm while dipping into the horseradish; at a nondenominational seder at which three hours of prayers preceded the first course (note for non-Jews: seders are all about food); trying to forget the holiday by spacing out at a spa; and last year with cousins I hadn't seen in a long time, whose table was filled with light conversation (no one asked why I'm not married)
FOOD
May 7, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
The preparations for Susanna Goihman's Passover seder began one week early and more than 1,200 miles away. Susanna's mother, Dorothy Goihman, made a batch of crunchy dill pickles at her home in Miami, and prepared and froze two desserts: fluden, a flourless fruit and nut cake, and a flourless chocolate fig cake. Closer to the holiday, her mother made eggplant salad, spicy Moroccan meatballs, potato flan and macaroons. The day before the seder, she packed everything for the flight to Philadelphia.
FOOD
September 28, 1994 | By Nick Malgieri, FOR THE INQUIRER
Macaroons - long used both as a confection and as an ingredient in other confections and desserts - probably originated somewhere in the almond-growing areas of Italy. By the middle of the 18th century, macaroons were well-established throughout Western Europe. In fact, several towns and convents in France and Italy were famous for producing them. Though Americans tend to think of macaroons as coconut cookies, most macaroons are really made from almonds or from a combination of almonds and apricot kernels.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|