CollectionsMacedonia
IN THE NEWS

Macedonia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 4, 1992 | By JOHN J. TSUCALAS
As Serbs war with Muslims in Bosnia-Herzegovina, there looms trouble between Greece and another former Yugoslav republic, now a nation, with its capital at Skopje. In 1944, that nation, in its new status as another Yugoslav republic, was named Macedonia. Now, over strong Greek objections, it wants to be recognized by that name. The new nation is on the northern border of Greece. The latter fears that its northeastern area, also called Macedonia, would be exposed to territorial claims by the new nation.
NEWS
May 4, 1999 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They pronounce the name Amreka with awe, and mostly what they know is that it is a rich, powerful country they've seen only in the movies. They also know that it is far, far away from the homes they reluctantly fled in Kosovo. The first 400 Kosovo refugees to the United States are to be flown out tomorrow morning on a Boeing 747 to Fort Dix in New Jersey, and yesterday the first passengers began to be selected by U.S. officials in Macedonia's largest refugee camp. As other refugees gazed from behind a wire fence, the chosen ones waited nervously in line, bewildered about how they were selected and unsure about where they were going.
NEWS
May 2, 1999 | By Jennifer Farrell, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was a conversation across continents. Students and teachers from North America and a high-school senior living in Macedonia discussed the conflict in Kosovo and came up with many questions but few answers. For Voorhees middle-school teacher Gianna Stanley, the teleconference last week was a chance to show her students that war had a face. "It makes much more of an impact than hearing it from me," she said after the 35-minute exchange that included six U.S. schools and one from Canada.
NEWS
April 2, 1999 | MICHAEL MALLY / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Staff members and volunteers for the American Friends Service Committee pack relief kits for displaced people fleeing the violence in Kosovo. Yesterday in Philadelphia, the Quaker organization loaded a 40-foot cargo container with more than 7,000 kits and other supplies for refugees. The supplies, which include blankets, soap, toothbrushes and clothing, are to be shipped to Skopje, Macedonia.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By Llazar Semini, Associated Press
TIRANA, Albania - An Albanian court convicted the country's fugitive former intelligence chief Thursday of murder for the 1995 death of a suspect who was illegally detained for an alleged plot to murder Macedonia's president. The court, which tried Ilir Kumbaro in absentia, also sentenced him to 15 years in prison. The victim, businessman Remzi Hoxha, an ethnic Albanian from Macedonia, was abducted by the secret police 17 years ago along with two other suspects for allegedly planning to kill then-Macedonian President Kiro Gligorov during a visit to Albania.
NEWS
March 24, 1999 | By John Donnelly, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
One of President Clinton's main arguments yesterday for launching strikes against Yugoslav military targets was that inaction could lead to a much wider conflict, perhaps even one spilling over into Greece and Turkey. But others have said that NATO bombing also could destabilize the volatile Balkans. A bombing campaign could provoke tens of thousands more ethnic Albanian refugees to flee Serbia's Kosovo province into the neighboring Yugoslav republic of Montenegro and into the adjacent countries of Macedonia and Albania.
NEWS
April 3, 1999 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The commander of the three U.S. soldiers captured by the Serbs rejected assertions that they had strayed across the Yugoslav border by mistake. Lt. Col. James W. Shufelt said yesterday that it was more likely that they were captured in Macedonia, then spirited across the border, or possibly dashed across to get away from gunfire. "My analysis right now is that something happened in Macedonia and that is what pushed them out," Shufelt said in an interview at his headquarters at the Skopje airport.
NEWS
March 26, 2013
Indonesia landslide kills 8 BANDUNG, Indonesia - A landslide triggered by torrential rain killed at least eight people and left nine others missing on Indonesia's main island of Java, an official said Monday. Nine houses were buried when mud gushed down from surrounding hills just after dawn Monday in West Bandung district. The Disaster Mitigation Agency said rescuers dug up the bodies of a man and his 7-year-old son embracing hours before darkness halted the search. - AP Britain reduces immigrant aid British Prime Minister David Cameron announced plans to curb access to welfare, housing, and free health care for non-Britons, as political parties jostle to persuade voters they understand concerns over mass immigration.
NEWS
January 16, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 24-year-old West Chester University student has been arrested and charged with repeatedly raping his 22-year-old wife and trying to force her to return to her home in the Balkan nation of Macedonia. Lirim Rufati of the 500 block of West Rosedale Ave. was arrested Friday by West Goshen Township police and charged with kidnapping to inflict injury or terror, false imprisonment, rape, deviate sexual intercourse, and aggravated assault. An affidavit of probable cause states that after almost a year of beating and raping his wife when she refused intercourse, Rufati drove her to John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City on Jan. 3, gave her a plane ticket to Macedonia, and saw her through the check-in line.
NEWS
April 2, 2001 | By Charles Krauthammer
There are two ways to look at war. One school sees it as a temporary emergency, the result of bad people taking control of important countries and wreaking havoc. The other tends to see conflict as endemic, ingrained in human nature and the perpetual striving of peoples for power and dominion. Liberals, with their belief in the perfectibility of human nature, tend to believe the first. Dour conservatives tend to share Ambrose Bierce's definition of peace as "a period of cheating between two periods of fighting.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 26, 2013
Indonesia landslide kills 8 BANDUNG, Indonesia - A landslide triggered by torrential rain killed at least eight people and left nine others missing on Indonesia's main island of Java, an official said Monday. Nine houses were buried when mud gushed down from surrounding hills just after dawn Monday in West Bandung district. The Disaster Mitigation Agency said rescuers dug up the bodies of a man and his 7-year-old son embracing hours before darkness halted the search. - AP Britain reduces immigrant aid British Prime Minister David Cameron announced plans to curb access to welfare, housing, and free health care for non-Britons, as political parties jostle to persuade voters they understand concerns over mass immigration.
NEWS
January 16, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 24-year-old West Chester University student has been arrested and charged with repeatedly raping his 22-year-old wife and trying to force her to return to her home in the Balkan nation of Macedonia. Lirim Rufati of the 500 block of West Rosedale Ave. was arrested Friday by West Goshen Township police and charged with kidnapping to inflict injury or terror, false imprisonment, rape, deviate sexual intercourse, and aggravated assault. An affidavit of probable cause states that after almost a year of beating and raping his wife when she refused intercourse, Rufati drove her to John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City on Jan. 3, gave her a plane ticket to Macedonia, and saw her through the check-in line.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By Llazar Semini, Associated Press
TIRANA, Albania - An Albanian court convicted the country's fugitive former intelligence chief Thursday of murder for the 1995 death of a suspect who was illegally detained for an alleged plot to murder Macedonia's president. The court, which tried Ilir Kumbaro in absentia, also sentenced him to 15 years in prison. The victim, businessman Remzi Hoxha, an ethnic Albanian from Macedonia, was abducted by the secret police 17 years ago along with two other suspects for allegedly planning to kill then-Macedonian President Kiro Gligorov during a visit to Albania.
NEWS
May 24, 2012
2 apples 2 pears 1 pint blueberries 2 nectarines 2 peaches 1/4 to 1/3 cantaloupe or honeydew melon Juice and zest from one lemon   1. Wash tree fruit and berries; peel peaches and pears. 2. Cut fruit (except berries) into small pieces about ½ to ¾ inch long and combine in a bowl. 3. Add lemon zest and mix thoroughly. Add lemon juice so its acidity is balanced with the natural sweetness of the fruit. From the kitchen of Giuliana and Bob Pierson Per serving: 110 calories, 1 grams protein, 28 grams carbohydrates, 20 grams sugar, trace fat, no cholesterol, 2 milligrams sodium, 5 grams dietary fiber.
NEWS
September 12, 2004 | By Carolyn Davis
In 1999, I managed a refugee camp in Macedonia for Muslims who had fled Kosovo. One morning, I was greeted with tears and twisted faces. A young girl had been killed the night before. She had survived the brutality of Slobodan Milosevic, and of NATO bombs meant for him, only to be struck down by a speeding vehicle as she crossed a dark road with her family. The community, made up of people who had fled violence themselves, reacted as one. And even though I was a stranger from a wholly different background, I was considered part of the extended family.
NEWS
August 30, 2001 | By Srdja Trifkovic
On the eve of the War in Kosovo, I wrote in the Times of London that NATO support of ethnic Albanian separatists in Kosovo would unleash a chain reaction whose first victim would be Macedonia, because "once KLA veterans acting as policemen start to patrol Kosovo, the rising expectations of Macedonia's Albanians will be impossible to contain. " "Nonsense," a U.S. State Department official snapped at a conference in Washington a few days later. "The problem in Kosovo is Milosevic.
NEWS
August 26, 2001
Macedonia came through in 1999 when NATO needed it, as bombs fell on Slobodan Milosevic's Yugoslavia. Now that Macedonia teeters near civil war, NATO must come through for the fragile nation in Southeast Europe. That means a NATO operation with a more realistic mandate than what it now has. And it means bolstering the country economically and politically. A force of 3,500 NATO troops has begun arriving in Macedonia. Its mission is narrowly defined: to oversee the voluntary disarming of ethnic Albanian rebels fighting the Macedonian Slav-led government as part of a peace plan co-brokered by the United States.
NEWS
August 16, 2001 | Daily News wire services
NATO troops being sent to disarm Balkan rebels NATO gave the go-ahead yesterday for 400 troops to deploy in Macedonia, the vanguard of a mission to disarm rebels in the troubled Balkan nation. The British servicemen and women from the 16 Air Assault Brigade will set out for Macedonia tomorrow, most of them headquarters, communications and other support personnel, officials said. NATO says that until there is a durable cease-fire, it won't send a full force of 3,500 troops, including Americans, into Macedonia - where they will be in what are now front-line areas, collecting weapons from ethnic Albanian rebels.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|