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Machine Guns

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NEWS
September 10, 1986
"Why not legalize bazookas? Tanks? Shoulder fired low yield nuclear rockets?" And why not, as an Aug. 31 editorial asked? At the time the Bill of Rights was written the intent of the Second Amendment was that there be a balance of power between the citizens and their government. Cannons, then the highest firepower available, could also be owned by private citizens or militia. In terms of relative absolute firepower the citizenry has already been disarmed by general consensus, since along with not wanting machine guns in the hands of homicidal maniacs we also don't want nuclear weapons in the hands of industrial security personnel or the Rockefellers, etc. There has been no replacement for the balance of power lost to the government, and this as much as anything is why you will find the National Rifle Association advocating what appears to you an implausible proposition.
NEWS
December 23, 1986 | By Alan S. Krug
There they go again. The news media, that is. Completely distorting another facet of the "gun control" issue. This time, it's machine guns and the National Rifle Association's (NRA) effort to repeal the Hughes amendment to the Volkmer-McClure bill. To hear the news media, one would think that the NRA wants every American sportsman to have a machine gun. "The right to keep and bear machine guns" seem to be the refrain of the media, suggesting that the NRA might also like for everyone to have a missile or even an atomic bomb.
NEWS
April 25, 1998 | By Eddie Olsen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Camden County Park Police sergeant who was suspended in June 1996 after he was charged with illegally possessing a machine gun was sentenced to one year probation and fined $155 yesterday. Richard D. Frisch, 45, of Erial, who resigned from the park police in February, declined to comment as he left Camden County Superior Court with his attorney, Saul J. Steinberg. Frisch pleaded guilty last February to having a prohibited fully automatic weapon. Assistant Camden County Prosecutor Joel H. Aronow said that investigators with the New Jersey State Police linked Frisch to two MAC-10 Avenger machine guns, manufactured by Hatten Arms.
NEWS
March 13, 1994 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When detectives from the Camden City Police Violent Crimes Task Force raided a house Friday night, they expected to find drugs. But they found much more. Along with drugs, cash and drug paraphernalia, investigators said they recovered two stolen machine guns and a handgun that is also believed stolen. Police arrested Scott Holloway, 24, of the 2800 block of Benson Street, and charged him with multiple drug and weapons violations. Holloway was being held in the Camden County Jail after he failed to post $107,000 bail.
NEWS
January 17, 1988 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Things are tough all over, and now, it's getting harder and harder to find a place willing to hold a good machine-gun shoot. Scratch the City of Reading's watershed, for instance, which by all accounts has been the site of several well-attended outings by sportsmen armed with Uzis and Thompsons and even antiaircraft guns. But Reading's mayor, who admits he doesn't understand why in the world anyone would want to fire a machine gun for fun, has just banned machine-gun shoots on city property.
NEWS
April 10, 1996 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Louis S. Hansen and Matthew Dolan, FOR THE INQUIRER Inquirer staff writer John Way Jennings and correspondent Christine Bahls contributed to this article
Two men with militia ties from Montgomery and Burlington Counties were jailed after searches of their homes yielded more than 60 weapons, including machine guns, silencers, grenade launchers and a flamethrower, the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms announced yesterday. William Kay, 59, of Skippack, a member of the Unorganized Militia of Pennsylvania, was indicted last week on charges he sold five 9mm Sten machine guns to an undercover ATF agent between September and November.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Residents of the Norristown area unloaded their guns on police in borough hall over the weekend. Sawed-off shotguns, pearl- and brass-handled revolvers, and fully automatic machine guns were turned over to area police for cash during the last leg of the countywide gun buy-back program in Norristown on Saturday and yesterday. They came wrapped in sandwich bags, dainty yellow shopping bags, and worn army-surplus duffel bags, hundreds of them. Lower Providence resident Hank Rhoads turned over a Radom 9 mm his late brother had bought in Germany.
NEWS
April 10, 1996 | SUSAN WINTERS/ DAILY NEWS
Special Agent Robert Wall (center), in charge of the Philadelphia Division of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, displays one of the machine guns seized in the arrest of William Kay, 59, of Collegeville, for gun selling and Russell Gary Fauver, 45, for being a felon in possession of firearms and ammunition. Included among the weapons seized was a flame thrower.
NEWS
August 31, 1986
Here's a little item from the believe-it-or-not file: The National Rifle Association announces its latest "highest priority" - to persuade Congress to repeal the ban on sale of new machine guns. Now there's a burning injustice all right. How can a red-blooded American act like Rambo if the feds won't let you buy a machine gun? The NRA claims three million members. Many are hunters. But we're not talking rifles or shotguns. These aren't things you take into the duck blind or stalking deer.
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NEWS
June 22, 2016
A political crisis is usually preceded by an intellectual and moral crisis. Dominant ideas that once seemed to hang together lose their hold when they are exposed as contradictory and incoherent. Similarly, moral claims made on behalf of a worldview can, gradually or suddenly, come to be seen as empty. Demoralization comes before defeat. This is what happened in the Soviet Union. A corrupt and dictatorial system fell for many reasons, but its demise became inevitable when even those with an interest in mouthing the old slogans and defending the old ideology came to realize that almost everyone around them thought they were extolling bunk.
NEWS
August 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WAS OK to be afraid; it was not OK to panic. Fear was natural for the men who flew the bombers over Germany in World War II. It rode with them in their planes like a living entity. But if you panicked, you couldn't do your job. That was the way Joe Blinebury described what it was like in those B-17 Flying Fortresses that carried the war to the enemy with dangerous daylight bombing. Oddly, Joe, who flew 35 missions over Germany, said he calmed down when he slipped into the ball turret, his position under the belly of the plane.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
I TOOK A FLIGHT over Philadelphia in a B-17 Monday. It was thrilling. Joseph Blinebury took 32 flights in a B-17 above Nazi-infested Europe. It was killing. He didn't die, but a lot of the World War II aviator's comrades did. "Guys - one day you're playing cards in the barracks, the next day they're gone," he says, his head shaking, his eye misting. When he speaks of those long-ago days of valor and victory, dread and death, he is a deep well, drawing up stories with a mind clear as a cockpit window.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
No one denies that something went horribly wrong on the firing range. It was the Fourth of July, 2010, at Forward Operating Base Kunduz in Afghanistan. Army Pvt. Sean McMahon was testing a new M2 machine gun. When .50-caliber weapon jammed in automatic mode, McMahon removed the ammo and tried again. Still, it did not fire. His commanding officer asked McMahon to try single shot mode. As McMahon squeezed the trigger, the M2 exploded in his hands. The blast sent a shell casing ripping through his calf.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Phuong Le, Associated Press
SEATTLE - A man who plotted to attack a Seattle military complex with machine guns and grenades was sentenced Monday to 18 years in prison. Abu Khalid Abdul-Latif, 35, also was ordered by U.S. District Judge James L. Robart to be supervised for 10 years after his release. Abdul-Latif, also known as Joseph Anthony Davis, pleaded guilty in December to conspiracy to murder U.S. officers and conspiracy to use weapons of mass destruction. Prosecutors argued for a 19-year prison sentence with lifetime supervision after his release, saying Abdul-Latif directed major aspects of the planned attack, including picking the Military Entrance Processing Station in south Seattle as a target.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST TRENTON, N.J. - On the runway of Trenton Mercer Airport, the Flying Fortress prepared for takeoff. Its four 1,200-horsepower engines roared to life and the fuselage vibrated as it had on other B-17 bombers before runs over Hitler's Germany. Warren Kimmel had seen photos and movies of massive aircraft, with their bristling .50-caliber machine guns. He had dreamed of serving on one when he enlisted in the Army Air Corps on Armistice Day, Nov. 11, 1942. But he never got the chance.
NEWS
May 26, 2012 | By Zeina Karam and Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - President Bashar al-Assad's forces killed at least 50 civilians, including 13 children, in central Syria on Friday, activists said, in one of the highest death tolls in one specific area since an internationally brokered cease-fire went into effect last month. Syrian troops using tanks, mortars, and heavy machine guns pounded the area of Houla, a region made up of several towns and villages in the province of Homs, the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights and the Local Coordination Committees activist groups said.
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Ben Hubbard, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Syrian troops armed with heavy machine guns killed dozens in the central city of Hama on Monday, activists said, just a day after chanting protesters welcomed a visit by a U.N. team sent to observe a shaky cease-fire. The day's violence, the city's worst in months, added a dangerous new aspect to the U.N. team's work: that the Syrian regime might exact deadly revenge against opponents who feel empowered by the observers' presence to spill into the streets. Observance of the truce, which was supposed to begin April 12, has been spotty at best.
NEWS
January 8, 2012 | Reviewed by Jim Newton
Gunfight The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America By Adam Winkler W.W. Norton. 361 pp $27.95 Adam Winkler's Gunfight is a potboiler of constitutional interpretation and is both a vital history and an intellectually satisfying, emotionally rewarding tale of a great case. The backbone of his book is District of Columbia v. Heller , a landmark gun-control case decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2008. As a contest of constitutional principles, Heller tested the question of whether the famously ambiguous Second Amendment ("A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed")
NEWS
August 12, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
PUEBLO, COLO. - A woman caught with her two brothers after a nationwide manhunt told Colorado authorities that she "deserved to get shot," according to an arrest affidavit. Lee Grace Dougherty, 29; Dylan Dougherty Stanley, 26, and Ryan Edward Dougherty, 21, were being held in Pueblo County jail, on bonds of $1.25 million each. The three had a court hearing yesterday, appearing by video from jail. None made any statement during the brief hearing. They face charges of attempted murder of a peace officer and assault on a peace officer.
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