CollectionsMachinery
IN THE NEWS

Machinery

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | By Stephen C. Row, Special to The Inquirer
Several residents of a new housing development in Northampton complained to township supervisors Wednesday about farm machinery stored on a neighbor's property. "This equipment is in violation of zoning regulations. . . . My children could get hurt," said Elizabeth DiSpirito, of Glenboro Drive in Richboro. The machinery belongs to Burger Turf Farm, a family business on Upper Holland Road. At one time, Robert Burger Sr. owned 80 acres, inherited from his parents and grandparents.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Canadian subsidiary of Lukens Inc. has purchased another Canadian firm. Simplicity Materials Handling Ltd. of Gulph, Ont., has purchased Thomas A. Dillon (Canada) Ltd. of Toronto for an undisclosed price. The company makes light-duty machinery, primarily vibrating screens for the aggregate industry to sort and size crushed stone, sand and gravel. Simplicity designs and manufactures heavy materials handling equipment including conveying machinery, crushers, shredders and pulverizers.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2013
Pennsylvania regulators on Thursday proposed new air emission standards on natural gas compressor stations, the machinery that moves gas from well sites to transmission lines that environmentalists have targeted as a major pollution source associated with Marcellus Shale development. The Department of Environmental Protection says the new standards impose limits that are 75 to 90 percent stricter than current standards for the largest compressor stations. DEP will accept comments on the proposed changes until March 19. More information is available on the agency's website: bit.ly/WikzXZ.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
People came for miles around to last Sunday's show at Sunset Park in West Grove, but it wasn't to hear the bluegrass or country music that the park is famous for. No, this was the very first outing for the Home & Farm Antique Association of Chester County, folks whose idea of an antique is an old washing machine or a Depression-era tractor. Pieces of machinery were laid out in orderly rows in a large open area that resembled an old Civil War battlefield with the morning mist hanging over it. The mist disappeared over the surrounding post and rail fence, and there was a stillness to the place.
NEWS
January 28, 2004 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A mechanic at a Cumberland County seafood-processing plant was in critical condition last night after both his arms were ripped from his body by a piece of machinery, authorities said. John W. Lackey, 26, of Bridgeton, had been defrosting a piece of heavy equipment at Surfside Products on Monday morning when he backed into the gear box of a conveyor belt, said Trooper Jaime Ablett of the New Jersey State Police. The belt started up suddenly, and Lackey's work jacket became caught in the gears.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Two California businessmen yesterday admitted smuggling about a half-ton of cocaine worth $50 million into Philadelphia from Colombia last year. George Eduardo Agudelo, 31, of Redondo Beach, and his brother, Rafael Humberto Agudelo, 29, of Huntington Beach, pleaded guilty in federal court to drug-trafficking charges that could keep them in prison for at least 24 years and possibly life. U.S. District Judge Thomas N. O'Neill Jr. ordered a presentence report prepared for both men, but didn't set a sentencing date.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / DIRK SHADD
Professor Alex Vianshelboim explains apparel-making machinery to Russian visitors at the Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science. Four Russian executives of Fleet Street, an American shirt manufacturer and owner of the largest shirt plant in Russia, are learning about the U.S. textile market.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1988 | By Idris Michael Diaz, Inquirer Staff Writer
The call came late one afternoon a few years ago. The Rothschild family of London was interested in obtaining several miles of beach property on the island of Martinique, property that was owned by Gulf & Western Co. The Rothschilds were a ready buyer and Gulf & Western was a willing seller. But they faced a crucial hurdle. How much was the beach land worth? For the answer, they turned to Manufacturers' Appraisal Co., a low-profile Philadelphia firm founded in 1899. While the firm originally filled its coffers by doing appraisals of dingy factories and machinery for tax and insurance purposes, Manufacturers' Appraisal has increasingly become a player in the fast-paced world of mergers, acquisitions and leveraged buyouts.
NEWS
June 25, 1988 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three Colombian nationals were charged with federal drug offenses after U.S. Customs officials found 1,052 pounds of cocaine hidden in a piece of machinery on a ship in Philadelphia and then spent a month tracking the cargo, authorities announced yesterday. Samuel Billbrough, special agent in charge of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in Philadelphia, said the three suspects were arrested as they were about to dismantle the machinery - a 10-ton gear used in a ship's engine - on Thursday at a warehouse in Brooklyn, N.Y. He said during a news conference that the cocaine had a wholesale value of $25 million and was the largest amount of the drug ever confiscated in the region.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 2, 2013
As the city kicks off its annual Independence Day celebration, it's important to remember that there is little freedom without participation. And freedom was threatened last year not only by voter-ID laws, which set up barriers to legitimate democratic participation, but also by confusion at the polls in Philadelphia, where thoughtful revolutionaries once gathered to write the Declaration of Independence. Seven months after the Nov. 6 election, three separate investigations - by Mayor Nutter, City Controller Alan Butkovitz, and the City Commissioners - have examined why more than 27,000 city voters had to use provisional paper ballots instead of voting machines.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Inside the former Collingswood Theatre, Tom Marchetty and Josh Longsdorf talk about assembling the cast of their new production. "We've got a photographer, a printmaker, a guy who makes portable power systems, and a woman who's got her own clothing line," Marchetty says. "We're looking for innovators," Longsdorf adds. "People who are passionate about what they do. " The 1,200-seat Haddon Avenue movie house, which was renovated decades ago for other commercial uses, reopened in January as the Factory Workers ("the Factory" for short)
BUSINESS
February 1, 2013
Pennsylvania regulators on Thursday proposed new air emission standards on natural gas compressor stations, the machinery that moves gas from well sites to transmission lines that environmentalists have targeted as a major pollution source associated with Marcellus Shale development. The Department of Environmental Protection says the new standards impose limits that are 75 to 90 percent stricter than current standards for the largest compressor stations. DEP will accept comments on the proposed changes until March 19. More information is available on the agency's website: bit.ly/WikzXZ.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2012 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
In their song "Human," the Killers ask: "Are we human, or are we dancer?" The singer intones, "My sign is vital, my hands are cold. " On Thursday night at Christ Church Neighborhood House, Meredith Rainey and Marcel Williams Foster put that question to the test in Carbon Dance Theatre's Science per Forms . It's a wonderful title for a piece that explores humanity's contest between body and machine, and the question of which drives which. The 45-minute work had multiple collaborators: Nine science, technology, architecture, and design wonks from Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania associated with IK Studio and the Hactory (yes, a haven for hackers)
BUSINESS
June 19, 2012 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Small businesses that make machines and components for other manufacturers are experiencing an upswing that could be a sign of things to come for the broader economy. The industries fueling the demand vary. In some cases, business is coming from medical device makers, which are expected to see increasing growth as baby boomers age and need more medical care. An uptick in orders is coming from oil and gas producers supplying energy to growing economies in countries such as China and India.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Al Schmidt, the leader of a dissident faction inside Philadelphia's Republican Party, won a hotly contested race for city commissioner Tuesday, defeating four-term incumbent Joseph Duda, who was backed by the GOP's longtime power structure. The vote leaves the commissioners - long the province of battle-toughened ward leaders schooled in the rough-and-tumble of street-level politics - with two Ph.D.'s among their three members - Schmidt with a doctorate in history from Brandeis University, and a new Democratic commissioner, Stephanie Singer, with a doctorate in mathematics from New York University.
NEWS
November 8, 2011 | By Bob Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Al Schmidt, the leader of a dissident faction inside Philadelphia's Republican Party, is the likely winner of a hotly-contested race for city commissioner, holding a solid lead over four-term incumbent Joseph Duda, who was backed by the GOP's longtime power structure. With 67 percent of the vote counted, Schmidt had built up a 7,600-vote lead, showing strength throughout the city. Schmidt held his own on Duda's home turf in Northeast Philadelphia, while outpolling Duda in neighborhoods like Center City, University City and Northwest Philadelphia, where some liberal groups had paired Schmidt and Democrat Stephanie Singer on a slate to bring change to the commissioners' office, responsible for running city elections.
NEWS
June 7, 2011 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
They're agrarian images of days gone by, from the late 1800s to the 1970s. A horse-drawn wagon loaded with a mountain of freshly harvested hay crosses an open field under puffy white clouds. A beauty queen, wearing a crown and white gloves, smiles as she stretches her arms over a pile of apples. An elderly farmer in overalls cradles a plump white chicken and poses for his portrait. The vintage black-and-white photographs are among more than 7,000 from the New Jersey Department of Agriculture's vast collection in the state archives in Trenton.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2009 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In terms of sheer numbers, construction is the second-most dangerous occupation in the nation, and James Wilson's fatal fall Monday from 125 feet as his aerial lift toppled is another sad example. Even though Wilson, 41, was by all accounts a highly trained union journeyman with an expertise in high work, the type of equipment he was using in Center City can pose problems on construction sites, experts say. That's because it carries the risks of any large piece of machinery, yet is used by all sorts of tradesmen - painters, bricklayers, and electricians who often receive only general training in its operation.
NEWS
June 8, 2008 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To spend a day on the job with the city's new managing director, Camille Cates Barnett, is to pull your chair up to some of the cleanest, most paper-free desks and conference tables in all of North American municipal government. This is a woman who takes no notes. "I can remember what I need to know," says Barnett, 59. All day, her cell phone rings maybe one time, and it's the movers. She takes one crisis call, about Wi-Fi, and appoints a youngster to deal with it. Her handpicked performance management team keeps the details, a group of clean-cut wonkish youngsters who skate around her all day with charts and reports and solutions.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|