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LIVING
April 19, 1987 | By Jim Brady, Special to The Inquirer
The music booms off the mirrored walls of the body mill, but the club members strapped into the white plastic Powercise machines are oblivious to the beat. They are hearing voices. With their ears pressed back between speakers and their eyes transfixed on a rising and falling light bar on a video screen overhead, members of the Living Well Fitness Center in North Dallas work out under the undivided attention of a new age of "humanoid" fitness machines - machines that tease, cajole and scold them into shape.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
A move to ban most cigarette machines in the township has been given tentative approval by the Uwchlan Township Board of Supervisors. "Kids have enough temptation today," said Board Chairman C. Ward Braceland at a meeting Monday. "We don't want minors smoking. We don't want adults smoking, really. " He said that machines accessible to minors, such as those in stores, would be outlawed, although the ordinance would permit machines to stay in bars. The proposed ordinance, suggested by the American Lung Association, would need to be reviewed by the township's solicitor and advertised before going into effect.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1996 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Xerox copiers flash the message "please wait" as they warm up. It's not uncommon to see this today, but it's a major departure from the past. Consider such familiar messages as: Right Turn Only, Close cover before striking, No Parking and Keep off the Grass. Never a please anywhere. Nor a thank you. Just orders: Call our toll-free number, Clip and save, Drive carefully, Mail early for Christmas and Do not touch. Helpful, yes. Pleasant? Not. However, there is now a new etiquette in direction-giving.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | by Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writer
ATM machines are starting to attract the attention of burglars. Thieves struck three Drug Emporiums in four hours late Sunday and early yesterday, absconding with two ATM's and abandoning a third after a burglar alarm went off. Police said this was a "new and unusual" crime and turned it over to the Major Crimes Division. 'It's too early to tell if they're connected but if I were a betting man, I'd bet they were connected," said one detective, who asked not to be identified.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1991 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
This weekend's antiquing activity features a grab bag of goods, ranging from objects from British royalty to teddy bears. At the Antique/Collectible Show & Sale at the Pennsylvania National Guard Armory in Northeast Philadelphia, the royal objects are among myriad offerings that include furniture, vintage clothing, classic arcade and gumball machines, jukebox literature, nostalgia items, china and jewelry. The $2.50 admission is good for both days. Children under 12 are admitted at no charge.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1991 | by Jenice Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Beginning late next year, some Philadelphians will be able to cash their paychecks at selected MAC machines - even if they have no funds at all in their accounts. It's all part of a new wrinkle for automatic teller machines that CoreStates Financial has been testing at its Newtown branch in Bucks County. The new MAC Icon Services machines work like this: Customers register their payroll checks at the bank for a certain amount. Then, when they receive their checks, they can take them to the MAC machine and withdraw either a portion or the entire amount to the exact penny.
NEWS
February 22, 2007 | By John Timpane
David Brooks is justly prominent as a thinker and writer who has contributed new thought and new language - "red state/blue state" - to our public discourse. In a recent column, reprinted here, Brooks performs a breathtaking feat: He warms up with Rousseau, sprints madly down the aisles of history, vaults through the burning hoop of genetics, and does a cannonball into the (for him, inevitably tragic and dark) pool of human nature. It's a great column. I'm glad he wrote it. I wish more columnists walked in such precincts.
NEWS
October 1, 2012
This was going to be a rant. Then I thought about it, which was a mistake. As any experienced ranter can tell you, thinking about it has the unfortunate tendency of turning a good, clean rant into a muddy quagmire of fine points, conditional sentences, and digressions as delicately balanced as a Swiss watch. Such was the case last month when California legalized self-driving cars in the Golden State. Cali joins Nevada in allowing Google and other manufacturers to test "autonomous" cars on its roads.
NEWS
June 28, 1987 | By Christine Hausman, Special to The Inquirer
The scene is common to most courtroom dramas: The defense attorney asks the witness a question. The prosecutor objects, accusing the attorney of leading the witness. Both attorneys engage in a heated argument over the merits of the question. The judge overrules the objection, and instructs the witness to answer the question. By then, the witness has forgotten what the question was, and so has the attorney. The judge asks the court stenographer to read back the question. In the courtroom of the future, such legal battles will continue to be commonplace, but are likely to have a different ending.
NEWS
May 19, 1995 | By Albert DiBartolomeo
I once read somewhere that a luxury, if used often enough, becomes a necessity. No adage seems truer to me than when I walk through my house and note the modern conveniences that, if I were suddenly deprived of them, would feel as though I've been cast abruptly into the Dark Ages. I've lived with washing machines and dryers for most of my adult life, but there was a time in my middle 20s when I lugged trash bags full of soiled clothing to my mother's house. It gave me an excuse to visit.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Though American writer-director James Gray is best known for crime dramas such as The Yards , We Own the Night, and Blood Ties , his 1994 debut, Little Odessa , about Jewish Russian émigrés in Brooklyn, showed he had a talent for capturing the peculiar rhythms of immigrant communities and the dynamics within first-generation families. He returns to some of those concerns with the stunning The Immigrant , a rich, complex drama set in the early 1920s about two Polish sisters who spend their last penny to emigrate to New York.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Five days a week, without fail, the three men meet at 3 p.m. at the Aquatic & Fitness Center in Jenkintown and exercise for about two hours. They have been working out together for at least 15 years. Jay Blumenthal, 80, is an insurance broker who lives in Holland, Bucks County. Len Michaels, 78, is a retired CPA in Huntingdon Valley. Bernie Kauderer, 80, is an optometrist who also lives in Huntingdon Valley. They have become gym buddies and fitness friends. "If I didn't have friends to do it with, I probably wouldn't do it with the same consistency," says Blumenthal.
SPORTS
March 14, 2015
   LAKELAND, Fla. - Bob McClure, whose tenure in major-league baseball dates to 1975, said he once surveyed about 100 major- leaguers with 10 or more years of experience. The reason was to learn at what point bona fide big- leaguers realize they truly belong at the highest level of their sport.    Nearly every one of them, McClure said, offered an answer of between their third and fourth big-league seasons.    McClure, the second-year Phillies pitching coach, recounted that one morning this week while speaking about the second-youngest starter in the team's major-league camp.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a ruling sure to fuel the illusions of some inveterate Pennsylvania gamblers, a sharply divided state appeals court has ruled that gambling machines can be games of skill, not chance. Well, at least the two poker machines played for a time at American Legion Knowles-Doyle Post 317 in Yardley, Bucks County. In a 2-1 decision filed Dec. 23, Superior Court ruled that on Oct. 15, 2010, state troopers wrongly seized the poker machines - a Jersey Hold 'Em and a Red, White & Blue. The troopers, backed by the District Attorney's office, seized the machines as evidence of illegal gambling.
FOOD
December 5, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like so many inventions before it, the BKON Craft Brewer began with a tenacious individual, a basement workshop, and a flash of inspiration. In this case, that individual was Dean Vastardis, who then worked at his family's business, Pennsauken's Lacas Coffee. The inspiration? It came from the Food Network. "I was watching Iron Chef and seeing how they sous-vide marinate proteins," he said. "It was very interesting to me how you could take something that would take hours - to marinate meats - and do it in a matter of minutes.
SPORTS
November 12, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jahmiere Van Kline planned on having a big season as a senior. But he has surprised himself with some aspects of his performance for the Bordentown football team. "Getting six touchdowns a game, I can't say I expected that," Van Kline said. Six touchdowns in a game is a once-in-a-lifetime event for most football players. Van Kline has done it two games in a row. The 5-foot-9, 170-pound athlete leads South Jersey in touchdowns with 30 and in rushing yards with 1,791.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Passersby couldn't help but stop and watch Marvin Kilgore one recent Saturday morning as he filled a vending machine in the Gallery with packages of human hair. Some pointed. Many giggled. And there was a lot of head shaking in disbelief. They had never seen anything like this before. Buying bundles of hair - also called tracks - to sew in to one's own hair for a long-as-Beyoncé mane is far from new. My very unscientific assessment: Three out of four women in the Gallery with beyond-shoulder-length hair likely have receipts for them.
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THE NOTION of swapping a used cellphone for instant cash at a kiosk attracts a lot of people, but sometimes for the wrong reasons. Cellphone-buyback machines were a subject of controversy last year when City Council tried for an outright ban. Critics said the machines incentivized cellphone thieves looking for a quick buck. The legislation stalled in committee and was never approved. But Council passed a bill Thursday that reached a compromise. Instead of barring these types of machines - which recycle handheld electronic devices and fork over cash in exchange - the city now will allow installation of kiosks, but the placement of each must be approved by Council.
SPORTS
October 9, 2014 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Staff Writer
PAT SHURMUR has lived 48 of his 49 years in places with rough winter climates. He always has been an early riser, out the door and into a cold car. He's old enough to predate remote starts and fuel injection. "When the car is warm and running, it's easy to take the wheel," Shurmur said. "Versus, you know, when it's . . . wruhh, wruhh, wruhh . " When Nick Foles took over as the full-time starting quarterback last season, Chip Kelly's fresh Machine Gun offense purred like a new Jaguar.
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