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BUSINESS
February 25, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services
It's not quite the year 2001, but Apple Computer Inc. has developed a HAL- like voice-activated computer that recognizes spoken commands and, sometimes, talks back. The voice-activated Macintosh can change the type size of a document, program a video recorder, pay bills, find a name in an electronic telephone directory, call the number and perform other functions that normally require typed-in commands or the use of a computer mouse. Once it completes the commanded operation, the Macintosh also talks back, reporting the job is finished, or asking if the user wants something else done.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1996 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He has been called a marketing guru, a computer gunslinger, the Moses of the Mac. And after helping create the cult of the Macintosh for Apple Computer more than a decade ago, he has returned to lead a Mac attack on the Windows world. It's just as stark as that - Mac versus Windows - to Guy Kawasaki, 42, the Hawaiian-born keeper of the flame for the Mac faithful, an author, speaker and zealot renowned for brash marketing tactics and an outsized ego. "I want to save people from the Gates of hell," he has said, in a breezy slap at Microsoft chief executive and software kingpin Bill Gates.
NEWS
August 30, 1996 | By Mara Stanley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Southeast Delco board members fought it out again Wednesday, this time over the question of which computer system is superior: Macintosh or IBM. At a boisterous special meeting, the board decided to buy Macintosh and IBM-compatible computers for the district in a 5-4 vote, with Edward W. Barnik, Joseph P. Duffy, Byron Mundy and John Summers dissenting. The move will cost the district about $202,000 over the next five years, including interest from a five-year, $150,000 loan from Mellon/PSFS.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marion Marguerite Stokes, 83, a librarian and social justice advocate who was a coproducer of a 1960s Sunday morning TV talk show entitled Input , died of lung disease Friday, Dec. 14, at her home in Rittenhouse Square. From 1967 to 1969, Mrs. Stokes and her future husband, John Stokes Jr., were co-producers, with David Van Meter, of Input, on which a panel would discuss key issues. The show aired on Channel 10. Mrs. Stokes often appeared on the show with her future husband.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1992 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard L'Hommedieu is a producer of video animation and a member of the relatively small following that has fallen in love with Commodore's Amiga computer. Yesterday, he made his way to a fancy meeting room in the Waldorf Astoria here so he could get his first look at Commodore's latest Amiga, the 4000, at a news briefing. Introduced a week ago at the "World of Commodore" show in Pasadena, Calif., the Amiga 4000 offers more power, more color and greater speed than the Amiga 3000, which used to be the top-of-the-line model.
NEWS
December 3, 1987 | By Janet Mason, Special to The Inquirer
Wherever it's going to be a computer Christmas, program purchases also should be carefully planned - because even the most dazzling personal computer won't do much without software. People who receive a personal computer (or buy one for themselves) this holiday season will find software that will make their past struggles with typewriters and filing cabinets seem like a hazy era from the Dark Ages. Many of the following software packages are readily available at department stores, such major computer stores as the Software Galleria (in Center City's Gallery)
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | From Inquirer Wire Services
IBM and Apple Computer Inc. announced plans yesterday to create a powerful alliance that aims to change the world of personal computing in the 1990s. The ambitious pact - to swap prized technologies, develop new machines and control virtually the entire industry - brings together the nation's two dominant PC makers, who have been fierce competitors for the last decade. Trying to stave off competition in the crowded $30 billion market, Apple and International Business Machines Corp.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | By Kathi Kauffman, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
A five-year plan designed to further incorporate computer technology into the curriculum of Lower Merion schools will cost the district more than $1.7 million over the next five years. The District Technology Committee presented the plan with the aid of a Macintosh computer projected onto an overhead screen at a school board meeting Monday night. "We are not looking to teach the students technology," said William Dolton, a math teacher and committee member, "but to incorporate technology into the achievement of curriculum goals.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1989 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
After only nine months as chief executive officer of Cricket Software Inc., R. Barry Schuler has resigned and been replaced by Barry M. Borden, the Malvern company said yesterday. Cricket, which creates drawing and graphing programs for the Macintosh personal computer, said Schuler's resignation was prompted by the company's rapid expansion. Last year revenues jumped 75 percent to about $10 million, Borden said. The larger company requires a chief executive officer who has more experience in operations than Schuler, whose background is marketing, Schuler said in a statement issued by the company.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Apple Computer Inc. stunned investors yesterday by predicting it would lose money in its current quarter because the competition has forced it to slash prices. The prediction comes despite higher sales. The warning sent the stock of the computer maker sliding 3 points, or 8 percent, as investors worried about the future of the third-largest PC maker. Apple stock fell $3 to $35.25 in active trading on Nasdaq. A loss would be Apple's first since the spring of 1993. It revived worries that Apple could attract a buyout suitor, or that the company could oust chief executive Michael Spindler.
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NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
For anyone with a smartphone or tablet, it is the most fundamental of gestures. A simple swipe or "pull" of the finger, and the screen is "refreshed" - revealing the presence of new e-mails, tweets, messages, whatever. The brainchild of some vast corporation? Nope. Meet Loren Brichter, a low-key 28-year-old who lives in Bella Vista. "Pull-to-refresh" was a feature of an app that he created in 2008, which allowed people to use Twitter with their iPhones. Twitter bought him out in 2010, and after working there for a year or two, he now has created another company.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marion Marguerite Stokes, 83, a librarian and social justice advocate who was a coproducer of a 1960s Sunday morning TV talk show entitled Input , died of lung disease Friday, Dec. 14, at her home in Rittenhouse Square. From 1967 to 1969, Mrs. Stokes and her future husband, John Stokes Jr., were co-producers, with David Van Meter, of Input, on which a panel would discuss key issues. The show aired on Channel 10. Mrs. Stokes often appeared on the show with her future husband.
NEWS
November 27, 2011
By Walter Isaacson Simon & Schuster. 630 pp. $35 Reviewed by Michael D. Schaffer Steve Jobs was all about things: elegantly designed things, wondrously innovative things, meticulously made things. Heck, let's steal his own quote: Steve Jobs was all about "insanely great" things. And about people? Not so much. Yelling and humiliation were mainstays of his management style; kindness was rare, meanness was not. Yet, along with the rage went a charisma that mesmerized those who worked with him and for him, drawing them into his dreams, with amazing results.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Bruce Newman, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS
CUPERTINO, Calif. - Steve Jobs, who sparked a revolution in the technology industry then presided over it as Silicon Valley's radiant Sun King, died Wednesday. He was 56 when he died, ahead of his time to the very end. The incandescent center of a tech universe around which all the other planets revolved, Mr. Jobs had a genius for stylish design and a boyish sense of what was "cool. " According to a spokesman for Apple Inc. - the company Mr. Jobs cofounded when he was just 21 and turned into one of the world's great industrial-design houses - he suffered from a recurrence of the pancreatic cancer for which he had undergone surgery in 2004.
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | By Bruce Newman, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS
CUPERTINO, Calif. - Steve Jobs, who sparked a revolution in the technology industry then presided over it as Silicon Valley's radiant Sun King, died Wednesday. The incandescent center of a tech universe around which all the other planets revolved, Jobs had a genius for stylish design and a boyish sense of what was "cool. " He was 56 when he died, ahead of his time to the very end. According to a spokesman for Apple Inc. - the company Jobs co-founded when he was just 21 and turned into one of the world's great industrial-design houses - he suffered from a recurrence of the pancreatic cancer for which he had undergone surgery in 2004.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2011 | By Patrick May, MCCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS
SAN JOSE, Calif. - He was the visionary techie, the marketing genius, the choleric corporate leader who could never quite scrub the rebel out of his soul. But most of all, standing there in his black mock turtleneck at the intersection of passion and technology, Steve Jobs seemed to know intuitively what consumers needed in their lives, even before they themselves could put a finger on it. Decades after co-creating Apple Inc., one of the planet's most storied companies, then leaving it behind, then returning to reinvent it and pump it full of high-voltage ideas until it became the world's most-valuable tech company, Jobs leaves a cultural landscape forever altered by his gadgetry and gusto.
NEWS
May 30, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1942, Rita Gilbert was among the first to volunteer for the Waves, the women's branch of the Navy. A college graduate, she took her military training at Smith College and was assigned to a military publications office in Washington. And there, her daughter Laurie said, she helped write and edit the Waves' recruitment brochure, "The Story of You in Navy Blue. " On Monday, May 16, Rita Gilbert Macintosh, 94, a former corporate art director and Montgomery County school speech therapist, died at home at Cathedral Village, a retirement community in Andorra.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2008 | By Jessica Mintz
ASSOCIATED PRESS Macintosh and iPod sales helped boost Apple Inc.'s fiscal third-quarter earnings 31 percent, beating Wall Street's expectations yesterday, but investors pummeled the stock after Apple issued soft guidance for the current quarter. Steve Jobs, Apple's chief executive officer, did not join the conference call with investors as he commonly does, prompting an analyst to inquire about his health. Jobs has survived pancreatic cancer. "He has no plan to leave Apple," chief financial officer Peter Oppenheimer responded.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2004 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago today, Jan. 22, 1984, Apple Computer Inc. used a revolutionary television commercial to launch a revolutionary product: the Macintosh. The Orwellian-themed commercial aired just once - during the Super Bowl - and showed a rebellious woman running through an audience of dronelike humans to smash a big-screen image of Big Brother, a not-very-subtle shot at IBM's dominance of the personal-computer industry. Two days later, the Macintosh went on sale, energizing the industry with its user-friendly mouse and a point-and-click screen that eliminated the need for users to learn arcane commands to open and manipulate the computer's files.
NEWS
May 24, 2002 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Here we go, Grandma: A mouse is not a rodent, there are no spiders in this Web, and nothing will crawl in if we leave the windows open. Got it? The hard wires at Chestnut Ridge Middle School crossed generational lines yesterday when the Washington Township sixth graders invited their grandparents to a technology tutorial. It was an opportunity for the grandparents to see what their progeny have learned in computer class this year - and a chance to see what they don't know about the Information Age. "It's amazing," said Marie Densten, 70, sitting with her 12-year-old granddaughter, Veronica.
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