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NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
For anyone with a smartphone or tablet, it is the most fundamental of gestures. A simple swipe or "pull" of the finger, and the screen is "refreshed" - revealing the presence of new e-mails, tweets, messages, whatever. The brainchild of some vast corporation? Nope. Meet Loren Brichter, a low-key 28-year-old who lives in Bella Vista. "Pull-to-refresh" was a feature of an app that he created in 2008, which allowed people to use Twitter with their iPhones. Twitter bought him out in 2010, and after working there for a year or two, he now has created another company.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Without a computer, David Wolf has difficulty reading and understanding his assignments. "I cannot spell; and when I write it out, I don't recognize the mistakes," said Wolf, a junior at the Delaware Valley Friends School in Bryn Mawr. "But when it's typed, I can see my spelling mistakes and distinguish between run-on sentences. I'm a visual learner and I really need to see it. " After attending six schools, Wolf is finding success at Delaware Valley Friends, in part because of its computers and word-processing program.
LIVING
November 15, 1987 | By Dan Gutman, Special to The Inquirer
A year ago, communications consultant Evan Herbert was invited to give a speech to a group of science journalists. It would have gone over fine except for one small thing - he forgot to show up. Herbert didn't think of the speech until he got that dreaded phone call: "Hey, we're all waiting! Where are you?" A missed appointment may be the most humiliating mistake in business, and it can damage both credibility and career. You can jot a meeting down in your appointment book and on your calendar, and stick Post-It notes all over the wall.
NEWS
January 25, 1996 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Could it really happen? Could Apple Computer Co., an institution as American as, well, apple pie, really fall? Has Apple's management frittered away all of its natural advantages? No need to worry too much, at least not yet, say computer-industry analysts. Apple may soon cease to be an independent firm, but the technology it pioneered has changed the world and will undoubtedly have more shelf life than the company itself, experts believe. Thanks to a series of management missteps, Apple is on the ropes and reportedly in takeover talks with one of the rising stars of the computer world, Sun Microsystems Inc. While Apple may fall, there are still an estimated 20 million users of its Macintosh computer, the machine that altered the industry when it was introduced in 1984.
NEWS
August 12, 1997 | By Michael Gray
So it has happened. Luke Skywalker has gone over to the Dark Side. He has turned his back on the Force, pushed Obi Wan Kenobi off his board of directors, and accepted $150 million of Darth Vader's blood money. We are talking, of course, of Steve Jobs and Apple Computer, the once valiant (if not exactly market-savvy) rebel kingdom and its deal with the Evil (well, smug and annoying, anyway) Empire of Bill Gates and his Microsoft Corp. OK, OK, maybe it's just another couple of rich-guy nerds figuring out a way to beat some other rich-guy nerds out of more market-share and you and me out of a few more dollars next time we try to buy the latest OS-this or PC-that.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1987 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steve Jobs, obnoxious but brilliant, revered and hated, chief guru of the demystification and unsanctification of the computer, was kicked out of Apple Computer Inc. nearly two years ago by John Sculley, the man he had hired to help him run the company. While there was little question that Sculley was better-suited than Jobs for the role of chief executive officer of a $1 billion corporation, that wasn't the only role Jobs had played. The public expected more from Apple than a sensible corporate structure and a fatter bottom line.
NEWS
December 6, 1999 | By Jan Booker
Without bombs, bullets, bayonets or banners, two young men started a revolution that has changed the course of this millennium and millennia to come. When computers were first being tested and incorporated into business and government, no one yet took seriously the idea that personal computing would be a factor in the life of ordinary citizens. It took two computer whiz kids, still college students, to see the potential for common usage. The leading geniuses in the creation of this technology are Steve Jobs and Bill Gates.
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | By Bruce Newman, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS
CUPERTINO, Calif. - Steve Jobs, who sparked a revolution in the technology industry then presided over it as Silicon Valley's radiant Sun King, died Wednesday. The incandescent center of a tech universe around which all the other planets revolved, Jobs had a genius for stylish design and a boyish sense of what was "cool. " He was 56 when he died, ahead of his time to the very end. According to a spokesman for Apple Inc. - the company Jobs co-founded when he was just 21 and turned into one of the world's great industrial-design houses - he suffered from a recurrence of the pancreatic cancer for which he had undergone surgery in 2004.
NEWS
November 27, 2011
By Walter Isaacson Simon & Schuster. 630 pp. $35 Reviewed by Michael D. Schaffer Steve Jobs was all about things: elegantly designed things, wondrously innovative things, meticulously made things. Heck, let's steal his own quote: Steve Jobs was all about "insanely great" things. And about people? Not so much. Yelling and humiliation were mainstays of his management style; kindness was rare, meanness was not. Yet, along with the rage went a charisma that mesmerized those who worked with him and for him, drawing them into his dreams, with amazing results.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2008 | By Jessica Mintz
ASSOCIATED PRESS Macintosh and iPod sales helped boost Apple Inc.'s fiscal third-quarter earnings 31 percent, beating Wall Street's expectations yesterday, but investors pummeled the stock after Apple issued soft guidance for the current quarter. Steve Jobs, Apple's chief executive officer, did not join the conference call with investors as he commonly does, prompting an analyst to inquire about his health. Jobs has survived pancreatic cancer. "He has no plan to leave Apple," chief financial officer Peter Oppenheimer responded.
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