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NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reputed mobster Nicodemo Scarfo Jr. - son of former Philadelphia mob boss "Little Nicky" - will remain in prison for decades, following in his father's footsteps. On Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Robert Kugler sentenced Scarfo to 30 years for the "iron fist" control he used to extort money from a bank. The judge noted that Scarfo's conviction for racketeering, conspiracy, and related offenses was his fifth, and the second in the federal system. Scarfo was convicted last summer. Three others convicted also face sentencing this week.
NEWS
June 9, 2000 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A broken foot might give some students the perfect excuse for a day out of school, but not Jennifer Van Auken. Twice, in second grade and sixth grade, Van Auken picked up her crutches and went to class. Such persistence and determination have brought seniors Van Auken, of Archbishop Prendergast, and Jenni MacIntosh, of Haverford High School, to their graduations with a rare achievement. They have completed years of perfect attendance - 12 for Van Auken, 13 for MacIntosh. "I told my father I'm not going to miss a single day - even if they have to put me on a stretcher, I will come to school," Van Auken said of her last 25 days of high school.
NEWS
May 23, 1996 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
OK, Macintosh users, you can relax. It just got much easier to find information and software for your computers. Aim your web browser at http://www.pht.com/info-mac/ and you'll end up in the Info-Mac Archive, a massive (more than 2 gigabyte) collection of shareware and freeware for Macs. A volunteer effort that has been around for more than a decade, Info-Mac takes hundreds of programs a month and makes them available on "mirrors" (copies) of the site worldwide. The new archive site provides information on how to access the software, detailed instructions for uploading software to the site, mirror locations, information about the Info-Mac Digest (a semi-daily periodical that provides a forum for Macintosh users of all levels and announcements of new additions to the site)
BUSINESS
May 31, 1986 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Commodore International Ltd. and Franklin Computer Corp. are hoping to capitalize on the popularity of the Apple Macintosh's push-button "mouse" controls and multiple-function screens with new products they will introduce tomorrow at the Consumer Electronics Show in Chicago. West Chester-based Commodore is pushing its workhorse Commodore 64 into the mouse world with its new Graphics Environment Operating System (GEOS), a software disk containing the operating system itself plus word processing, graphics and desktop utility programs.
NEWS
February 29, 1996 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Matt Heppe's ninth-grade history class at Wissahickon High School has an assignment: develop an interactive resume for a historical or well-known figure. When they finish their projects, they won't just know more about the person they select; they'll also know how to scan in photos, record their voices into a computer and create animated objects. They will learn to do these things on an Apple Macintosh computer - just like students at most of the schools in America. Though it has lost some of its lead against competitors, Apple still commands 54 percent of the market for computers for education in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
"I'm poorly made. " That's Steve Jobs talking - well, wordsmith Aaron Sorkin channeling Steve Jobs - near the end of the film that bears the name of the Apple cofounder and late, lamented, mythologized, criticized tech icon. Jobs (Michael Fassbender) is talking to his daughter, Lisa (Perla Haney-Jardine), a Harvard freshman whose relationship with dad has been rocky, to say the least. First, Jobs denied that he was her father, and even after DNA tests proved paternity, he refused to acknowledge her. In Steve Jobs , directed with cinematic gusto by Danny Boyle from a theater-piece Sorkin script, Lisa comes and goes (ages 5 and 9, two very good young actresses)
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | By Kay Raftery, Special to The Inquirer
Donald B. Houghton, 72, former director of the Computer Center at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, died June 13 at his home in St. Davids. Mr. Houghton was born in Washington and grew up in Mountain Lakes, N.J. He graduated from Morristown High School and Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Va., before receiving a master's degree from the University of Michigan. Mr. Houghton worked at the Franklin Institute from 1946 to 1960. In 1960, he joined the Westinghouse Electric Co. When he left in 1972, he was vice president of the Westinghouse Telecomputer Systems Corp.
LIVING
July 12, 1987 | By Dan Gutman, Special to The Inquirer
Hold on to your seats, guys. Playboy Magazine is now available on computer. Right now you can read this month's table of contents, some of the ads, cartoons, quotes from the Playboy Interview, the Playboy Advisor and a full- length article. And there is a pictorial! But more on that later. Playboy, now 33 years old and read by 16 million readers worldwide, has spawned Playboy Online. Aimed at attracting computer users to read the magazine, it is available on several computer information networks and electronic bulletin boards across the country.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Three months after taking charge of Apple Computer Inc., Gil Amelio yesterday laid out a strategy for the struggling computer-maker's recovery that includes a slimmed-down product line, stepped-up Internet focus, and new management structure. Now, he's got to produce, analysts and investors said. Amelio, the company's new chairman, speaking here to 4,000 developers of software for the Apple Macintosh, said: "Apple has got to get back to work. We are taking the necessary measures to permanently strengthen our cash position and our general financial health.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1989 | By Robert Hollis, Special to the Inquirer
It's been a week of baffling contradictions for Apple Computer Inc. On Thursday, the company rolled out a speedier and beefier Macintosh computer. The announcement came two days after Apple reported a hefty 16 percent increase in first-quarter profits. However, the double dose of ostensibly good news did a strange thing to Apple's stock: It caused shares to drop nearly 10 percent during the week, although the stock recovered slightly by the close yesterday to $41, up $0.50.
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