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NEWS
December 6, 1999 | By Jan Booker
Without bombs, bullets, bayonets or banners, two young men started a revolution that has changed the course of this millennium and millennia to come. When computers were first being tested and incorporated into business and government, no one yet took seriously the idea that personal computing would be a factor in the life of ordinary citizens. It took two computer whiz kids, still college students, to see the potential for common usage. The leading geniuses in the creation of this technology are Steve Jobs and Bill Gates.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1998 | Daily News staff, Bloomberg News and wire reports
mortgages Now's the time to buy a home If you've been thinking about refinancing a mortgage - or if you're a potential first-time homebuyer looking for a reason to make the jump - this may be it. The interest rate on the federal government's 30-year bond has tumbled to its lowest level ever, spurred by Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan's remarks this weekend about possible deflation. The yield on the 30-year Treasury, a benchmark for mortgage loans and other interest rates, fell as low as 5.731 percent, the lowest since the Treasury began issuing 30-year bonds on a regular basis in 1977.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1997 | By Reid Goldsborough, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's no secret that Apple Computer, maker of the "insanely great" Macintosh personal computer, is facing some hard times. The computer manufacturer, based in Cupertino, Calif., has been losing money for several years and has laid off thousands of workers. Top executives have been resigning en mass. So, does it make sense to buy a Mac today? In short, it depends. It depends on which personal computer equipment you're currently exposed to and on your experience and expectations in general.
NEWS
August 12, 1997 | By Michael Gray
So it has happened. Luke Skywalker has gone over to the Dark Side. He has turned his back on the Force, pushed Obi Wan Kenobi off his board of directors, and accepted $150 million of Darth Vader's blood money. We are talking, of course, of Steve Jobs and Apple Computer, the once valiant (if not exactly market-savvy) rebel kingdom and its deal with the Evil (well, smug and annoying, anyway) Empire of Bill Gates and his Microsoft Corp. OK, OK, maybe it's just another couple of rich-guy nerds figuring out a way to beat some other rich-guy nerds out of more market-share and you and me out of a few more dollars next time we try to buy the latest OS-this or PC-that.
NEWS
August 30, 1996 | By Mara Stanley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Southeast Delco board members fought it out again Wednesday, this time over the question of which computer system is superior: Macintosh or IBM. At a boisterous special meeting, the board decided to buy Macintosh and IBM-compatible computers for the district in a 5-4 vote, with Edward W. Barnik, Joseph P. Duffy, Byron Mundy and John Summers dissenting. The move will cost the district about $202,000 over the next five years, including interest from a five-year, $150,000 loan from Mellon/PSFS.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1996 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He has been called a marketing guru, a computer gunslinger, the Moses of the Mac. And after helping create the cult of the Macintosh for Apple Computer more than a decade ago, he has returned to lead a Mac attack on the Windows world. It's just as stark as that - Mac versus Windows - to Guy Kawasaki, 42, the Hawaiian-born keeper of the flame for the Mac faithful, an author, speaker and zealot renowned for brash marketing tactics and an outsized ego. "I want to save people from the Gates of hell," he has said, in a breezy slap at Microsoft chief executive and software kingpin Bill Gates.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1996 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As if Apple Computer Co. doesn't have enough problems, the beleaguered firm yesterday acknowledged that it would repair defects that might be found in a million or more of its Macintosh home and Power Macintosh school computers. The actual number of computers affected is uncertain, and Apple declined to be specific. Industry analysts estimated that the total could easily top a million units. One industry analyst compared the service alert to Intel Corp.'s decision in late 1994 to replace flawed Pentium processors.
NEWS
January 25, 1996 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Could it really happen? Could Apple Computer Co., an institution as American as, well, apple pie, really fall? Has Apple's management frittered away all of its natural advantages? No need to worry too much, at least not yet, say computer-industry analysts. Apple may soon cease to be an independent firm, but the technology it pioneered has changed the world and will undoubtedly have more shelf life than the company itself, experts believe. Thanks to a series of management missteps, Apple is on the ropes and reportedly in takeover talks with one of the rising stars of the computer world, Sun Microsystems Inc. While Apple may fall, there are still an estimated 20 million users of its Macintosh computer, the machine that altered the industry when it was introduced in 1984.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Apple Computer Inc. stunned investors yesterday by predicting it would lose money in its current quarter because the competition has forced it to slash prices. The prediction comes despite higher sales. The warning sent the stock of the computer maker sliding 3 points, or 8 percent, as investors worried about the future of the third-largest PC maker. Apple stock fell $3 to $35.25 in active trading on Nasdaq. A loss would be Apple's first since the spring of 1993. It revived worries that Apple could attract a buyout suitor, or that the company could oust chief executive Michael Spindler.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Without a computer, David Wolf has difficulty reading and understanding his assignments. "I cannot spell; and when I write it out, I don't recognize the mistakes," said Wolf, a junior at the Delaware Valley Friends School in Bryn Mawr. "But when it's typed, I can see my spelling mistakes and distinguish between run-on sentences. I'm a visual learner and I really need to see it. " After attending six schools, Wolf is finding success at Delaware Valley Friends, in part because of its computers and word-processing program.
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