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BUSINESS
September 18, 1992 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard L'Hommedieu is a producer of video animation and a member of the relatively small following that has fallen in love with Commodore's Amiga computer. Yesterday, he made his way to a fancy meeting room in the Waldorf Astoria here so he could get his first look at Commodore's latest Amiga, the 4000, at a news briefing. Introduced a week ago at the "World of Commodore" show in Pasadena, Calif., the Amiga 4000 offers more power, more color and greater speed than the Amiga 3000, which used to be the top-of-the-line model.
FOOD
June 10, 1992 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Confidence just may be William F. Mahoney's secret in baking a prize-worthy apple pie. "Over years of making apple pie, I have perfected the flaky crust, accompanied by a sweet crumb topping, which differentiates it from the traditional apple pie," the 33-year-old Bridesburg resident wrote on his entry form for the Daily News Blue Ribbon Apple Pie Contest, judged last Wednesday at the Philadelphia County Fair. Mahoney's formidable deep-dish entry topped a nine-pie field to take the blue ribbon and the $100 first prize.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | By Kathi Kauffman, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
A five-year plan designed to further incorporate computer technology into the curriculum of Lower Merion schools will cost the district more than $1.7 million over the next five years. The District Technology Committee presented the plan with the aid of a Macintosh computer projected onto an overhead screen at a school board meeting Monday night. "We are not looking to teach the students technology," said William Dolton, a math teacher and committee member, "but to incorporate technology into the achievement of curriculum goals.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services
It's not quite the year 2001, but Apple Computer Inc. has developed a HAL- like voice-activated computer that recognizes spoken commands and, sometimes, talks back. The voice-activated Macintosh can change the type size of a document, program a video recorder, pay bills, find a name in an electronic telephone directory, call the number and perform other functions that normally require typed-in commands or the use of a computer mouse. Once it completes the commanded operation, the Macintosh also talks back, reporting the job is finished, or asking if the user wants something else done.
NEWS
September 12, 1991
"Let the readers know they should encourage their children to be the best they can be," writes Laverne Clark. "Enclosed is a profile on a rising star. " The profile listed the accomplishments of 10-year-old Tiffany MacIntosh, who happens to be Laverne Clark's daughter. Tiffany has been on the honor roll at Pastorius School for three years - winning excellence awards for her A's in math and science. She's a library aide, a safety patrol guard and on student council. She's also a two-time talent show winner, with a routine she calls "street dancing" to rap songs.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | From Inquirer Wire Services
IBM and Apple Computer Inc. announced plans yesterday to create a powerful alliance that aims to change the world of personal computing in the 1990s. The ambitious pact - to swap prized technologies, develop new machines and control virtually the entire industry - brings together the nation's two dominant PC makers, who have been fierce competitors for the last decade. Trying to stave off competition in the crowded $30 billion market, Apple and International Business Machines Corp.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1989 | The Inquirer Staff
Apple Computer Inc. yesterday unveiled a smaller, less expensive version of its Macintosh personal computer that is designed to take up less space on a desktop. Analysts hailed the new machine, called the Macintosh IIcx, as a needed competitor for mid-range computers made by IBM, Compaq Computer Corp. and others. The Macintosh IIcx is 11 inches across, compared with 18 inches for the Macintosh II and the Macintosh IIx. The new machine packs as much power as the Macintosh II, but costs about $200 to $400 less in most configurations.
NEWS
January 8, 1989 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
Downingtown area business owners seem less concerned with losing business than with potential traffic problems if a major regional mall is built on the site of the former Brandywine Inn on U.S. Route 30. "We're very pleased" with the plans for a major regional shopping mall, said Lynn Smith, general manager of the Downingtown Farmers Market, which has been across from the site known as the Downingtown Inn for about 37 years. Last month, multimillionaire J. Leon Altemose closed the Brandywine Hotel and conditionally sold the land to a group led by Michigan real estate developer A. Alfred Taubman.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1989 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
After only nine months as chief executive officer of Cricket Software Inc., R. Barry Schuler has resigned and been replaced by Barry M. Borden, the Malvern company said yesterday. Cricket, which creates drawing and graphing programs for the Macintosh personal computer, said Schuler's resignation was prompted by the company's rapid expansion. Last year revenues jumped 75 percent to about $10 million, Borden said. The larger company requires a chief executive officer who has more experience in operations than Schuler, whose background is marketing, Schuler said in a statement issued by the company.
NEWS
July 10, 1988 | By Matt Freeman, Special to The Inquirer
The Office Works Computer Centers, one of the nation's 50 largest personal computer dealers, plans to open a retail, service and training center in Chester County. Jere Brown, sales manager, said the Lancaster-based company wanted to expand into the suburban Philadelphia area, which it had identified as a high- growth market. Company officials had not picked the new store's location, according to Brown, but he said it would open Sept. 1. The company plans to hire about 10 people - a sales manager, sales representatives, service technicians and post-sales support consultants - to run the store, Brown said.
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