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Macular Degeneration

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LIVING
May 26, 1997 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Henry Wells says he used to read everything he could get his hands on - newspapers, magazines, books. But two years ago, the 82-year-old retired University of Pennsylvania professor found that letters started to run together, and sentences bent and curved as if seen through a warped mirror. His doctors told him that the center of the retina - the macula - in his right eye was deteriorating from age, a condition called macular degeneration. They could prescribe no glasses, no eyedrops, nothing to correct the problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013
If you're worried about the recent study linking aspirin use to an age-related disease that leads to blindness , specialists at Wills Eye Institute have some reassuring advice. The Australian study, published last week in JAMA Internal Medicine, found that taking aspirin at least once a week more than doubled the chance of macular degeneration, including the more damaging "wet" type, among 2,389 adults followed for 15 years. But the 15-year incidence was still relatively small - about 5.8 percent of regular aspirin users compared with 2.2 percent of nonusers.
NEWS
November 9, 1994 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Spinach, collard greens and all those other vegetables that make youngsters blanch are a key to avoiding a blinding eye disease in old age. The disease, macular degeneration, causes the center of the retina to deteriorate and is responsible for destroying some or all vision in 5 percent of Americans 70 and older. But there's hope. Those who eat the most vegetables containing carotenoids have as much as a 43 percent decreased risk. Carotenoids are a class of yellow to deep-red pigments found in some vegetables and animal tissue.
NEWS
February 8, 1998 | By Brian Thevenot, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Last November, Mayor Sue Ann Metzner started noticing odd disturbances in her vision. While she was driving, a flat road in front of her sometimes looked like an upward slope; a coin sitting on a table looked dented. She had thought she would have more time. The disturbances were in her good eye. Her other eye had succumbed seven years ago to an eye disease called macular degeneration, which, while common, usually affects only the elderly. Metzner, only 50, knew she would have to have the good eye checked.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A type of therapy that combined training in emotional and physical coping skills helped patients who were facing blindness to avoid depression, a new study from Thomas Jefferson University has found. Patients with age-related macular degeneration who got the experimental treatment at home were half as likely to become depressed as those who simply talked with a therapist about their illness and its consequences. In the study, published last week in the journal Ophthalmology, 12.6 percent of patients who received a therapy called "behavior activation" became depressed, compared with 23.4 percent of the control group.
NEWS
June 22, 2012 | By Meeri Kim, Inquirer Staff Writer
About two years ago, Fredric Kornberg was in his Bermuda hotel on business when his eyesight started doing strange things. The smoke detector on the ceiling seemed to be moving, he said, and the pinstriping on his car became "distorted, wavy. " Kornberg, 81, a Bala Cynwyd resident, was diagnosed soon after returning home with an eye disorder called macular degeneration - the leading cause of vision loss in the United States for those 60 and older. Luckily for Kornberg, doctors began treatment early enough to save his vision, but many others are going untreated and becoming blind.
NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When critics lamented the treatment of macular degeneration with a drug that costs up to 40 times as much as the alternative, physicians defended the practice by pointing to infections in patients who got the cheaper drug. That argument no longer holds water, according to a new University of Pennsylvania study. Researchers reviewed insurance claims data for 58,612 patients who received more than 380,000 injections of the two drugs, Avastin and Lucentis, and found they posed equally low risks of infection.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I know that drinking alcohol in moderation can be a good thing, but what would you consider to be the ideal quantity? Answer: The American Heart Association recently posed that question to 1,000 American adults and found that while 76 percent of those surveyed agreed with the statement that wine (not other forms of alcohol) can be good for the heart, only 30 percent knew the American Heart Association's recommended limits for daily wine consumption - no more than two drinks per day for men and no more than one drink a day for women.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By Meeri Kim
The last 10 years have seen a dramatic rise in the percentage of older Americans afflicted with vision-threatening eye disorders, as seen in new data released by Prevent Blindness America in partnership with the National Eye Institute and Johns Hopkins University. "I think it's alarming that the prevalence rates are rising because these are devastating diseases," says Richard S. Kaiser, a retina surgeon at Wills Eye Institute. "It's one thing to talk about a population, and describe a population with a disease, but … when you are with these people day in and day out, it is heartbreaking to have to diagnose them with these conditions.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2007 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shares of Genaera Corp. tumbled 35 percent yesterday after the Plymouth Meeting company said it would halt clinical development of a macular degeneration drug and cut its workforce by 30 percent, or 12 jobs. Genaera announced it would terminate development of Evizon, aimed at treating an eye disorder that is the leading cause of blindness in adults over 55. The company said it ended a midstage patient study after not enrolling enough people. The biopharmaceutical firm instead will focus resources on the development of trodusquemine, a treatment for obesity, and said it expected to begin an early-stage Phase 1 clinical trial in the first half of this year.
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NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When critics lamented the treatment of macular degeneration with a drug that costs up to 40 times as much as the alternative, physicians defended the practice by pointing to infections in patients who got the cheaper drug. That argument no longer holds water, according to a new University of Pennsylvania study. Researchers reviewed insurance claims data for 58,612 patients who received more than 380,000 injections of the two drugs, Avastin and Lucentis, and found they posed equally low risks of infection.
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
FORMER TRAFFIC Court Judge Fortunato N. Perri Sr., who pleaded guilty in 2013 to federal fraud charges related to a ticket-fixing scam, is unlikely to get jail time when he is sentenced on Friday. A federal memorandum filed Monday said house arrest was appropriate for Perri, 78, because of his medical condition. Court-ordered examinations, including an MRI, showed that Perri's health has declined after two strokes. And, according to a separate sentencing memo filed yesterday by defense attorney Brian McMonagle, Perri also has Crohn's disease and macular degeneration.
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
MILLVILLE, N.J. - There is a cycle of inevitability in nature - of birth, growth, evolution, and, eventually, death - that hasn't escaped the eye of Pat Witt. Renowned for capturing the beauty of the changing seasons in the swampy bogs of South Jersey, Witt, 88, is beloved for teaching four generations of children and adults to look deep beyond the mechanics of painting and drawing. Thousands of students have passed through the doors of her Barn Studio of Art since she opened it in 1962, a place that has been called a sanctuary for creativity on the bottom floor of a converted hay barn and florist shop in a wooded glen off Whitaker Avenue.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A type of therapy that combined training in emotional and physical coping skills helped patients who were facing blindness to avoid depression, a new study from Thomas Jefferson University has found. Patients with age-related macular degeneration who got the experimental treatment at home were half as likely to become depressed as those who simply talked with a therapist about their illness and its consequences. In the study, published last week in the journal Ophthalmology, 12.6 percent of patients who received a therapy called "behavior activation" became depressed, compared with 23.4 percent of the control group.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013
1 BUCKLE UP EVERY TIME Every year thousands of lives are saved because of seat belts - about 30 percent of highway deaths are attributed to the occupants' not being restrained. 2 ANNUAL CHECKUP See the doctor at least once a year for a physical. When you go to the doctor have your blood pressure, blood sugar, triglycerides and cholesterol tested. Ask for the results and maintain a file with the numbers. This way you can see where you're trending and manage a problem before it starts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013
If you're worried about the recent study linking aspirin use to an age-related disease that leads to blindness , specialists at Wills Eye Institute have some reassuring advice. The Australian study, published last week in JAMA Internal Medicine, found that taking aspirin at least once a week more than doubled the chance of macular degeneration, including the more damaging "wet" type, among 2,389 adults followed for 15 years. But the 15-year incidence was still relatively small - about 5.8 percent of regular aspirin users compared with 2.2 percent of nonusers.
NEWS
June 22, 2012 | By Meeri Kim, Inquirer Staff Writer
About two years ago, Fredric Kornberg was in his Bermuda hotel on business when his eyesight started doing strange things. The smoke detector on the ceiling seemed to be moving, he said, and the pinstriping on his car became "distorted, wavy. " Kornberg, 81, a Bala Cynwyd resident, was diagnosed soon after returning home with an eye disorder called macular degeneration - the leading cause of vision loss in the United States for those 60 and older. Luckily for Kornberg, doctors began treatment early enough to save his vision, but many others are going untreated and becoming blind.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By Meeri Kim
The last 10 years have seen a dramatic rise in the percentage of older Americans afflicted with vision-threatening eye disorders, as seen in new data released by Prevent Blindness America in partnership with the National Eye Institute and Johns Hopkins University. "I think it's alarming that the prevalence rates are rising because these are devastating diseases," says Richard S. Kaiser, a retina surgeon at Wills Eye Institute. "It's one thing to talk about a population, and describe a population with a disease, but … when you are with these people day in and day out, it is heartbreaking to have to diagnose them with these conditions.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last Thursday, 75-year-old inmate BB8134 - William Barnes - was in cell B177, one of 500 men housed in one of four blocks at the sprawling state prison at Graterford in Montgomery County. Monday afternoon, Barnes was 36 stories above Center City, with a vista that included the skyline and the Schuylkill, meandering its way through the distant suburbs. He was paroled Friday, almost two years after a Philadelphia jury acquitted him of murder in the death of city police Officer Walter T. Barclay, whom he shot and wounded in 1966.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert August Ziesing, 89, formerly of Wayne, a retired metallurgist, died Tuesday, Nov. 8, of pancreatic cancer at Beaumont, a retirement community in Bryn Mawr. Mr. Ziesing grew up in Wayne and graduated from the Haverford School. During World War II, he served in the Navy aboard a destroyer escort, the Rinehart, in the Pacific. After his discharge, he earned a bachelor's degree in metallurgy in 1947 from Yale University and then was a roughneck in oil fields in Colorado.
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