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Macular Degeneration

SPORTS
June 25, 2007 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some people indulge in ice cream and cake on their birthday. Not Craig Alexander. The Australian triathlete flew here from Colorado Springs, Colo., on Friday - his 34th birthday - to participate in the third annual Philadelphia Insurance Triathlon. Yesterday, he made sure it was a birthday weekend that deserved a celebration. Alexander didn't just win the men's competition of the 1,500-meter swim, 24.8-mile bicycle race and 6.2-mile run through Fairmount Park. He set a meet-record time of 1 hour, 52 minutes, 18 seconds.
NEWS
December 28, 2003 | By Phil Joyce FOR THE INQUIRER
The night that I lost my sight I thought that I would die. I passed the time by sleeping. In my waking hours I'd cry. The words are from "Seeing Through the Darkness," by Lea Fisher, 86, of Visionaries - a support group for visually impaired adults. Fisher doesn't have much time for tears these days. She has her poetry, her songwriting, her dancing and her Visionaries activities, which are time-consuming. Fisher is the poet laureate of Visionaries, whose members don't spend any time bemoaning their fate.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last Thursday, 75-year-old inmate BB8134 - William Barnes - was in cell B177, one of 500 men housed in one of four blocks at the sprawling state prison at Graterford in Montgomery County. Monday afternoon, Barnes was 36 stories above Center City, with a vista that included the skyline and the Schuylkill, meandering its way through the distant suburbs. He was paroled Friday, almost two years after a Philadelphia jury acquitted him of murder in the death of city police Officer Walter T. Barclay, whom he shot and wounded in 1966.
NEWS
October 3, 2005 | By Rita Giordano and Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Oh, how they danced. Back in the day, Jack and Kaye Kelly could clear a dance floor when they did the jitterbug. Just 10 years ago, their style and skill delighted the seniors they came to entertain at the former Zurbrugg Memorial Hospital in Riverside, the town where Jack built their home nearly six decades ago. Most days this summer, the Kellys still went to Zurbrugg - not to dance, but to eat at a county senior lunch program....
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A head-to-head trial of two drugs used to treat age-related macular degeneration - Avastin and Lucentis - ended in a virtual tie, researchers announced Thursday. "The two drugs give nearly identical results when given in the same way," said Maureen Maguire, a professor of ophthalmology at the University of Pennsylvania and one of the leaders of the multicenter trial. That should be good news for Avastin, the much cheaper of the two drugs and one that is already widely used to treat wet macular degeneration even though it does not have FDA approval for that use. It's not such good news for Avastin's maker, San Francisco-based Genentech, because Genentech also makes Lucentis, a very similar drug.
NEWS
December 10, 2011
Ukulele virtuoso Bill Tapia, known as the "Duke of Uke," died Dec. 2 in his sleep at his Westminster, Calif., home. Mr. Tapia was a month short of his 104th birthday. Mr. Tapia is credited with putting the ukulele on the map. At 96, his career had an unprecedented resurgence, and he released his first CD with many of his trademark hits, such as "Little Grass Shack. " Until last year, he gave private ukulele lessons and continued performing live, including at the Warner Grand Theatre in San Pedro, where he celebrated his 100th birthday with a special concert.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Tom Avril and Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Among the weapons to treat the "wet" form of macular degeneration in 2012 were two potent drugs that are injected into the eye. Studies have found the two to be equally effective, yet Medicare pays doctors less than $50 to administer one and about $320 to inject the other. Which do you think doctors used more often? The costlier one, by far. Local ophthalmologists say that money isn't a factor in their decisions and that there are medical reasons to use the more expensive Lucentis for some patients.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | By Michelle R. Davis, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Irene Heslip lowered her head onto a chin rest and pressed her forehead against a metal bar. A pinpoint of red light shone into her right eye. Less than a minute later, an oversized computer screen showed her the magnified, spidery blood vessels running through the back of her eyeball. Ophthalmologist Leonard H. Ginsburg pointed out problem spots in the back of the retina - an area that until recently, had never been seen in such detail. Heslip is afflicted by age-related macular degeneration - the leading cause of blindness for those over 65. About 30 percent of people over 75 years old lose some vision to the disease, said Ginsburg, director of the Retina and Diabetic Eye Institute, which opened on the second floor of Mercy Haverford Hospital in Havertown in November Two weeks ago, Ginsburg began injecting a dye, normally used for detecting heart and liver problems, into patients' bloodstreams to increase the clarity of photographs taken by a computer imaging system called Topcon 501A.
NEWS
February 25, 2004 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gilbert Rubin, 86, of Cherry Hill, an optometrist who practiced in South Camden for more than 60 years, died of leukemia Saturday at Virtua-West Jersey Hospital Marlton. Dr. Rubin maintained his practice on Kaighn Avenue through Camden's economic prosperity and struggles, using the front of his home for many years before moving his practice across the street to a more modern office. He kept it there after moving to his home in Cherry Hill. A graduate of the Pennsylvania College of Optometry, he began practicing in the community after serving in the Army medical corps during World War II, when he was stationed in Germany and provided eye exams for troops.
NEWS
July 29, 2010
Rufus Clare Rudisill III, 82, formerly of Haverford, a retired senior project manager at National Software Testing Laboratories, died of liver disease Sunday, July 25, at Dunwoody Village in Newtown Square. For more than 20 years, until retiring in his 70s, Mr. Rudisill was employed by National Software Testing Laboratories in Conshohocken. Previously he held management positions for 15 years with Food Fair Corp. in Newark, N.J., Miami, Baltimore, and Philadelphia. Mr. Rudisill graduated from Abington High School and enlisted in the Navy at the end of World War II. He attended radar school in Chicago, where he and all his classmates contracted scarlet fever, his brother, Brantley, said.
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