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Mad Hatter

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1991 | By Ellen Goldman Frasco, Special to The Inquirer
Youngsters can step through an imaginary looking glass and enter a topiary wonderland at Longwood Gardens' 11th annual Chrysanthemum Festival, opening tomorrow and continuing for five weeks. To carry out the theme "Alice's Wonderland," there's a large steam- spouting topiary teapot - topiary is a sort of living sculpture, in which shrubs or trees are trimmed to become works of art - as well as topiary figures resembling characters from Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Steven Rea and Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITICS
The new year, and new decade, get going with new entries from a formidable trio of top-tier Hollywood auteurs: There's a lysergic-looking reimagining of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland from Tim Burton; a roiling Gothic thriller, Shutter Island, from the just-honored-at-the-Golden Globes Martin Scorsese, and a timely revisit to the trading floors in Oliver Stone's Wall Street sequel. In the horror vein, The Wolfman, with Benicio Del Toro in lycanthrope mode, looks hair-raising.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2010
9 p.m. LIFETIME If you're looking for off-the-wall inspiration, it's hard to beat the work of milliner Philip Treacy (right), whose loony lids give new meaning to the term "mad hatter. " Contestants are instructed to use his wild hat designs as a starting point for their latest challenge.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / BARBARA JOHNSTON
The gymnasium of the Narberth Presbyterian Church, at Windsor and Gralying Avenues, was transformed Friday into the wonderland where one can meet that famous collection of extraordinary characters. At left, Jennifer McLean portrays Alice. At right, Sarah Tucker as the Mad Hatter prepares to pour for the March Hare, played by Austine Howard, and the Doormouse, played by Betsy Nielson.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
B RITTANY GILLESPIE, 30, of Roxborough, is CEO and lead designer for Petals Lane, a florist and wedding/special-events planner on Ridge Avenue near Harmon Road, Roxborough. Her husband, Michael Phinney, 32, takes care of the books and the event setup and breakdown work. I spoke with Gillespie. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the biz? A: My husband and I worked at Robertson's in Chestnut Hill and there was no way to move up in the business. We were dating at the time and we just decided to start our own business.
NEWS
October 30, 2011
"Believe as you will, child," the Queen of Hearts told Alice smugly. "I'm the most potent card in Wonderland. As a sign of their respect, no ace or king will capture me. " "Of course, your majesty," Alice sighed. As the game at the Mad Hatter's had gone on, she had grown used to the Queen's bluster. "Think not?" the Queen said. "Just one deal will prove it. " The March Hare dealt and opened one spade, and Alice tried two hearts. The Dormouse, North, trusted Alice's vulnerable overcall and bid game even though his king of spades looked worthless.
FOOD
March 24, 1999 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts, all on a summer day. The Knave of Hearts, he stole those tarts, and took them quite away! There were plenty of tarts and other goodies to go around when a normal-size Alice and some of her Wonderland friends joined about 90 youngsters and parents for a tea party in town on a recent Saturday. The Alice in Wonderland Tea Party and Brunch, cohosted by the Warwick Hotel and the Rosenbach Museum, initiated an ongoing program of community events planned in the hotel's newly restored lobby.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2015 | Lauren McCutcheon, Daily News Staff Writer
If they're old enough to read - or, at least, to understand - the original Alice in Wonderland, they're old enough to appreciate the Rosenbachs' three-pronged exhibit. One room delves into the history of the timeless book, from a boat trip in Oxford through the story's Disney-fication and psychedelic reimaginings. The next, "Alice's Adventures in Phillyland," has mostly grown-up appeal, with typed letters and handwritten figures that tell the local piece of the true story. The last space is 100 percent interactive, with the inventions of Charles Dodgson (a/k/a Lewis Carroll)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2000 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Remember when President George Bush, running for re-election, visited a supermarket for a photo op and was dumbfounded when he encountered, obviously for the first time, one of those bar-code scanners? Well, the children who visit "The Supermarket," the Please Touch Museum's exhibit opening today, shouldn't be as amazed at what technology hath wrought. And at what goes on in a supermarket - the inside skinny - unless (as seems unlikely) their mothers or fathers haven't taken them to one already.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2015 | Lauren McCutcheon, Daily News Staff Writer
If they're old enough to read - or, at least, to understand - the original Alice in Wonderland, they're old enough to appreciate the Rosenbachs' three-pronged exhibit. One room delves into the history of the timeless book, from a boat trip in Oxford through the story's Disney-fication and psychedelic reimaginings. The next, "Alice's Adventures in Phillyland," has mostly grown-up appeal, with typed letters and handwritten figures that tell the local piece of the true story. The last space is 100 percent interactive, with the inventions of Charles Dodgson (a/k/a Lewis Carroll)
NEWS
March 1, 2013
B RITTANY GILLESPIE, 30, of Roxborough, is CEO and lead designer for Petals Lane, a florist and wedding/special-events planner on Ridge Avenue near Harmon Road, Roxborough. Her husband, Michael Phinney, 32, takes care of the books and the event setup and breakdown work. I spoke with Gillespie. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the biz? A: My husband and I worked at Robertson's in Chestnut Hill and there was no way to move up in the business. We were dating at the time and we just decided to start our own business.
NEWS
October 30, 2011
"Believe as you will, child," the Queen of Hearts told Alice smugly. "I'm the most potent card in Wonderland. As a sign of their respect, no ace or king will capture me. " "Of course, your majesty," Alice sighed. As the game at the Mad Hatter's had gone on, she had grown used to the Queen's bluster. "Think not?" the Queen said. "Just one deal will prove it. " The March Hare dealt and opened one spade, and Alice tried two hearts. The Dormouse, North, trusted Alice's vulnerable overcall and bid game even though his king of spades looked worthless.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2010
9 p.m. LIFETIME If you're looking for off-the-wall inspiration, it's hard to beat the work of milliner Philip Treacy (right), whose loony lids give new meaning to the term "mad hatter. " Contestants are instructed to use his wild hat designs as a starting point for their latest challenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Steven Rea and Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITICS
The new year, and new decade, get going with new entries from a formidable trio of top-tier Hollywood auteurs: There's a lysergic-looking reimagining of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland from Tim Burton; a roiling Gothic thriller, Shutter Island, from the just-honored-at-the-Golden Globes Martin Scorsese, and a timely revisit to the trading floors in Oliver Stone's Wall Street sequel. In the horror vein, The Wolfman, with Benicio Del Toro in lycanthrope mode, looks hair-raising.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2000 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Remember when President George Bush, running for re-election, visited a supermarket for a photo op and was dumbfounded when he encountered, obviously for the first time, one of those bar-code scanners? Well, the children who visit "The Supermarket," the Please Touch Museum's exhibit opening today, shouldn't be as amazed at what technology hath wrought. And at what goes on in a supermarket - the inside skinny - unless (as seems unlikely) their mothers or fathers haven't taken them to one already.
FOOD
March 24, 1999 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts, all on a summer day. The Knave of Hearts, he stole those tarts, and took them quite away! There were plenty of tarts and other goodies to go around when a normal-size Alice and some of her Wonderland friends joined about 90 youngsters and parents for a tea party in town on a recent Saturday. The Alice in Wonderland Tea Party and Brunch, cohosted by the Warwick Hotel and the Rosenbach Museum, initiated an ongoing program of community events planned in the hotel's newly restored lobby.
NEWS
January 11, 1998 | By Patricia Quigley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Looking for a cup of tea? A selection of sandwiches? A large portion of charm? The Secret Garden Tearoom & Cafe offers all of that and more. Tucked into the lower level of The Warehouse, a building at 2 S. Main St. that holds several stores selling antiques, collectibles and more, The Secret Garden is the 11-month-old business of Lisa Patterson, 42, an Upper Deerfield resident. The atmosphere is a small part rustic (whitewashed stone walls) and a large part country garden (latticework, vine-covered posts)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1991 | By Ellen Goldman Frasco, Special to The Inquirer
Youngsters can step through an imaginary looking glass and enter a topiary wonderland at Longwood Gardens' 11th annual Chrysanthemum Festival, opening tomorrow and continuing for five weeks. To carry out the theme "Alice's Wonderland," there's a large steam- spouting topiary teapot - topiary is a sort of living sculpture, in which shrubs or trees are trimmed to become works of art - as well as topiary figures resembling characters from Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass.
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