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NEWS
March 25, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
A mushroom cloud looms over London, millions of citizens incinerated, the radioactive ash descending on the rubble. In October 1962, at the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis, 13-year-old Sally Potter saw this doomsday scenario - every night in her dreams. "It's very interesting, those people who can directly remember the crisis," says the filmmaker, whose beautiful Ginger & Rosa - about two London teenagers, fast friends caught in a whirl of personal and political tumult - is set during that fateful fall, when the whole world looked as if it were going to go ka-boom.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Got cable? What do you when you lose service 90 minutes before the World Series and Penn State games? You call your service provider, right? Good luck with that, bud. Turns out there are 47 different listings for Comcast in the phone book. I knew I had hit pay dirt when I got a recorded menu that was harder to negotiate than Mideast peace. I was prompted to enter so much information (phone number, account number, etc.), I thought they were going to ask for my mother's Social Security.
NEWS
January 25, 2010 | By Bill Bonvie
There's a nonsensical bit of business in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland that could well apply to a certain contemporary political trend. It occurs, appropriately enough, in the chapter titled "A Mad Tea Party. " The Mad Hatter announces that he wants a clean cup and suggests, "Let's all move one place on. " But, as it turns out, "The Hatter was the only one who got any advantage from the change: and Alice was a good deal worse off than before, as the March Hare had just upset the milk jug into his plate.
LIVING
December 10, 2008 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Since its inception 20 years ago, Philadelphia ad agency Gyro Worldwide has run campaigns for Boyds and Urban Outfitters and?for international enterprises Budweiser, Camel and MTV. When it wasn't busy with those accounts, Gyro created its own, like the Sailor Jerry Rum brand and the Bikini Bandits film series. That's pretty much ad business as usual - if it weren't for the fact that Gyro is so unusual. Gyro, having claimed it invented certain unconventional marketing techniques, used drag queens and murderers to advertise South Street's Zipperhead punk clothier.
LIVING
April 7, 2010 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leo Mulvihill looks the classic man's man. The hat is one clue. Displaying an old-school flair for style, the 25-year-old law student at Drexel University walks around campus sporting a vintage Brooks Brothers three-piecer and authentic 1960s Florsheims, his trilby cocked just so. The elegant look from another era makes a suave statement and exudes a certain authority - evoking equal parts image and lifestyle that a growing number of young...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
In 2010, there's too much too good on TV. Here are a dozen series coming up (with channel and season premiere date) that have exceptional promise, refuting those snobs who say TV is a wasteland. The emphasis is on the new, but some ace series are returning, too: Damages, FX (Returning, tomorrow). Glenn Close and Co. are joined by Martin Short and Lily Tomlin, cast against type, as one of the most tense and intricate dramas on TV starts anew. Lost, 6ABC (Returning, Feb. 2)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2009 | By HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
HOW MANY stories over the past 40 years have started this way: "Members of the Jackson family can't agree . . . " The latest feud has to do with whether Michael's three children will be part of an A&E reality show titled "The Jacksons: A Family Dynasty. " Unfortunately, the title "Mad Men" was taken. An Us Weekly source says that the program will include the MJ Three, even though eldest sister Rebbie (who will not take part) says that Michael would never have let it happen.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A cascade of blond hair, an exhalation of cigarette smoke, the promise of erotic bliss. That's how April (Kate Winslet) first appears to Frank (Leonardo DiCaprio) in Revolutionary Road. Sam Mendes' devastating if flawed adaptation of the Richard Yates novel is, in part, the pipe dream of a gypsy who marries an admirer and sets up camp in the Connecticut suburbs of the 1950s. When the tobacco is extinguished what comes between April and Frank Wheeler is bigger, colder and more formidable than the iceberg that sundered Kate and Leo in Titanic: shattered hope.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2010 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
THE WALKING DEAD. 10 p.m. tomorrow, AMC. AMC has become the TV home for tales of a lone man in the midst of personal turmoil, from "Mad Men"'s crisis-challenged Don Draper to "Breaking Bad's" cancer-stricken meth dealer Walter White to "Rubicon's" perma-paranoid Will Travers. But none of these guys battle zombies. AMC's newest foray into original programming is "The Walking Dead," based on the Image comic created by Robert Kirkman and Tony Moore. And viewers beware: This is a new breed of horror television.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
The big-buzz Sundance movie "An Education" is set in 1961, and as acolytes of "Mad Men" can tell you, that's no insignificant detail. It's a year that finds the West poised on the edge of enormous change - as a woman in "A Serious Man" (also set in the 1960s) puts it, it's a time when forward-looking people can take advantage of "the new freedoms. " Change is in the wind in "An Education," the story of an exceedingly bright prep schoolgirl named Jenny (Oscar nom shoo-in Carey Mulligan)
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