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Mad Men

ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
In 2010, there's too much too good on TV. Here are a dozen series coming up (with channel and season premiere date) that have exceptional promise, refuting those snobs who say TV is a wasteland. The emphasis is on the new, but some ace series are returning, too: Damages, FX (Returning, tomorrow). Glenn Close and Co. are joined by Martin Short and Lily Tomlin, cast against type, as one of the most tense and intricate dramas on TV starts anew. Lost, 6ABC (Returning, Feb. 2)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2009 | By HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
HOW MANY stories over the past 40 years have started this way: "Members of the Jackson family can't agree . . . " The latest feud has to do with whether Michael's three children will be part of an A&E reality show titled "The Jacksons: A Family Dynasty. " Unfortunately, the title "Mad Men" was taken. An Us Weekly source says that the program will include the MJ Three, even though eldest sister Rebbie (who will not take part) says that Michael would never have let it happen.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A cascade of blond hair, an exhalation of cigarette smoke, the promise of erotic bliss. That's how April (Kate Winslet) first appears to Frank (Leonardo DiCaprio) in Revolutionary Road. Sam Mendes' devastating if flawed adaptation of the Richard Yates novel is, in part, the pipe dream of a gypsy who marries an admirer and sets up camp in the Connecticut suburbs of the 1950s. When the tobacco is extinguished what comes between April and Frank Wheeler is bigger, colder and more formidable than the iceberg that sundered Kate and Leo in Titanic: shattered hope.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2010 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
THE WALKING DEAD. 10 p.m. tomorrow, AMC. AMC has become the TV home for tales of a lone man in the midst of personal turmoil, from "Mad Men"'s crisis-challenged Don Draper to "Breaking Bad's" cancer-stricken meth dealer Walter White to "Rubicon's" perma-paranoid Will Travers. But none of these guys battle zombies. AMC's newest foray into original programming is "The Walking Dead," based on the Image comic created by Robert Kirkman and Tony Moore. And viewers beware: This is a new breed of horror television.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
The big-buzz Sundance movie "An Education" is set in 1961, and as acolytes of "Mad Men" can tell you, that's no insignificant detail. It's a year that finds the West poised on the edge of enormous change - as a woman in "A Serious Man" (also set in the 1960s) puts it, it's a time when forward-looking people can take advantage of "the new freedoms. " Change is in the wind in "An Education," the story of an exceedingly bright prep schoolgirl named Jenny (Oscar nom shoo-in Carey Mulligan)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2010
SO MUCH television, so little time: Even if zombies didn't already make me nervous - when you're a TV critic, you don't need anything else nibbling away at your brain - the ratings for Sunday's premiere of AMC's "The Walking Dead" would probably have caused a slight shudder. I don't begrudge AMC a single one of the 5.3 million viewers who tuned in for Frank Durabont's smart but grisly adaptation of the Robert Kirkman comic-book series, which really begins to get interesting (for me, at least)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011
BEVERLY HILLS , CALIF. - We won't see Season 5 of "Mad Men" until next March - production gets underway a week from Monday - but AMC's already ordered Season 6, according to network programming exec Joel Stillerman. Stillerman also confirmed reports that Jon Hamm, who stars as "Mad Men's" Don Draper, will make his directorial debut in the fifth-season premiere. And while he was confirming things, he also noted the departure of executive producer Frank Darabont from "The Walking Dead" and the elevation of one of the show's writers, Glenn Mazzara, to Darabont's role as showrunner.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
AFTER Tuesday's Supreme Court decision on affirmative action, we have a better idea why "Mad Men" is such a popular TV show. The series, set in the '60s, doesn't strike a note of nostalgia for the fashions, the glamour or the incessant smoking, but for the period in the country when actual progress was being made. Consider some of the milestones of the '60s: the court's Brown v. Board of Education decision, which prohibited segregated schools; the Civil Rights Act that outlawed discrimination; the enforcement of affirmative action for the first time; the Voting Rights Act; and the war on poverty, to name just a few. It was a time of high ideals and strong leaders who pushed the country to reach for racial, social, civic and financial equality.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2009 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
"MAD MEN" STAR Christina Hendricks (secretary Joan Holloway) is going to be making a lot of men mad. TV Guide reports she will marry Geoffrey Arend ("Trust Me") Oct. 11 in Manhattan. "It's exciting," Hendricks said. "I'm wearing a beautiful Carolina Herrera dream gown. " It's exciting for her? Few women on TV can fill out a gown like Hendricks. Arend will wear a Brooks Brothers tuxedo to the small ceremony, but no one will notice. Hopefully Hendricks and Arend will have better luck in wedlock than Usher and Tameka Raymond.
NEWS
September 21, 2012
"WE WERE 'Mad Men,' " recalls George Futak, the Vesper Club's maitre d' since 1990, talking about a much earlier era. "More business deals were done in the Vesper Club than anywhere in the state. " The 1950s and early '60s were an era of private dining clubs, male privilege, smoking at your desk and gas-guzzlers with sky-high fins. Now, the century-old Vesper Club has just completed a move from its intimate two-story Sydenham Street hideaway to the massive Racquet Club of Philadelphia on 16th Street.
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