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Madman

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NEWS
April 7, 1992 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
When it was written in 1923, The Madman and the Nun was regarded as an outlandish piece of avant-garde theater, unappreciated by audiences and most critics. The playwright, Stanislaw Witkiewicz was, it turned out, a forerunner of the theater of the absurd and decades ahead of his time. To contemporary audiences familiar with the plays of Beckett and Ionesco and accustomed to the frankness of modern theater, The Madman and the Nun's crazy situations, insane-asylum setting and none-too-discreet sexual liaison between a lunatic and a nun seem neither particularly avant-garde nor outrageous.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
The madman and the nun in the third and last production of the Vox Theatre Company's maiden season are isolated in a bare cell of what in the distant past was called a lunatic asylum. He is enveloped in a straitjacket and she in a habit, but within 20 minutes of her arrival in the cell they are shorn of their inhibiting armor and locked in erotic embrace, and when the lights go up again after a mercifully brief blackout, are entwined in afterglow and sharing a post-coital cigaret. So begins the short and passionate romance of Walpurg, a schizoid poet, and Sister Anna, a young tart who went for the nunnery on the rebound from a scuttled love affair.
NEWS
January 11, 1995 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
It looks as if Dabney Coleman is down for the count. Coleman's "Madman of the People," which has performed disappointingly in perhaps television's choicest slot - sandwiched between "Seinfeld" and "ER" on NBC - will get a couple more Thursday night broadcasts before going on hiatus, NBC entertainment president Warren Littlefield said this week. "The show's been struggling," Littlefield said, adding that the network might try "Madman" in another time period "to see if it's got any legs anywhere else.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
All season, I've been mourning the loss of the Barrymore Awards and their formal recognition of this region's theatrical excellence. So, in their memory (and in this production's delusional spirit), I nominate Quintessence Theatre Group's The Diary of a Madman , an adaptation of Nikolai Gogol's satirical short story, in whatever categories it would have qualified: best actor, director, production, music, actress. Whatever. This isn't a perfect production, and we'll get to that, but it is brave, bold, and affecting, with a central performance (in a two-person cast, sort of)
SPORTS
November 3, 2004 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a day when the NHL player representatives and their alternates met in Toronto to discuss issues, Flyers representative Robert Esche called NHL commissioner Gary Bettman "a madman. " Esche made his comments after the reps' meeting. "We're talking to a madman," Esche told Toronto television station Sportsnet. "A guy who has no rhyme or reason. Personally, I don't even think he is a fan of the game. "I think there are a lot of great owners out there, but there is a madman leading them down the wrong path.
NEWS
October 18, 2005 | By Andy Borowitz
North Korean madman Kim Jong-Il created a firestorm of controversy today by naming a non-madman to succeed him as president, prompting critics to question whether his nominee possessed the qualifications to replace one of the world's most insane leaders. At a news conference in Pyongyang, the mercurial Kim introduced his hand-picked successor, Kyung Hwa Chim, who has been his personal chef for the last 35 years. But even as a beaming Kim praised his nominee's credentials, critics combed Chim's record looking for any evidence of insanity and came up empty, causing many to wonder if the seemingly sane Chim was truly qualified for the job. Speaking on condition of anonymity for fear of being thrown into the core of a nuclear reactor, one such critic said, "With all of the insane people in Kim's government, why would you pick a non-lunatic with no madman experience whatsoever?"
NEWS
October 13, 1994 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
Amy Aquino has one of those names you may not be able to place, and one of those faces you've definitely seen before. She was Cher's bossy beautician in "Moonstruck," Melanie Griffith's secretary in "Working Girl. " She played working mom Phyllis Silver in CBS's "Brooklyn Bridge," Gary David Goldberg's widely praised but not so widely watched '50s drama. This season, the Lower Merion native is back in series television in NBC's "Madman of the People," a not so widely praised but much more widely watched sitcom starring Dabney Coleman.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just past midnight on Aug. 2, America suddenly had a new villain. His name was Hussein. This was not the Hussein that most Americans knew - the small, mannered king of Jordan whose elegant wife grew up in New Jersey. No, this was another Hussein: Saddam, of Iraq. He had a bushy mustache and fierce, dark eyes, wore a revolver and combat fatigues - and his tanks had just rolled into Kuwait. During the last decade, U.S. leaders and media had referred to him as a "strongman" and, from time to time, had taken his side.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | BY CHUCK BARNEY, Contra Costa Times
CRAVING SOME intel on ABC's action-thriller "Last Resort," (8 p.m. Thursdays, ABC) we sought out Andre Braugher on the North Shore of Oahu for some answers: Q: What's the best and worst thing about working in Hawaii? A: The best thing is that it's paradise and that it's infused with a fascinating spirit. The worst thing is that it's 5,000 miles away from the people I love. . . . but opportunities to work on potentially groundbreaking shows cannot be overlooked. Q: Why were you attracted to this role?
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Like all fledgling theater companies, the Vox, now midway into its sophomore season, must find its niche or wither away in the process. In the matter of play selection, it has performed thus far much in the manner of a new darts player in the neighborhood whose opponents insist he address the target blindfolded. Last season, Vox scored one out of three with the whimsical comedy "Lloyd's Prayer," bracketed by two certified dogs, a pompous adaptation of "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" and a perfectly awful reprise of a 1923 classic of the Polish avant-garde, "The Madman and the Nun. " Vox opened its current season with a well-received sleeper, "Love Talk," and will round it out six weeks hence with a black comedy titled "Kvetch.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
All season, I've been mourning the loss of the Barrymore Awards and their formal recognition of this region's theatrical excellence. So, in their memory (and in this production's delusional spirit), I nominate Quintessence Theatre Group's The Diary of a Madman , an adaptation of Nikolai Gogol's satirical short story, in whatever categories it would have qualified: best actor, director, production, music, actress. Whatever. This isn't a perfect production, and we'll get to that, but it is brave, bold, and affecting, with a central performance (in a two-person cast, sort of)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | BY CHUCK BARNEY, Contra Costa Times
CRAVING SOME intel on ABC's action-thriller "Last Resort," (8 p.m. Thursdays, ABC) we sought out Andre Braugher on the North Shore of Oahu for some answers: Q: What's the best and worst thing about working in Hawaii? A: The best thing is that it's paradise and that it's infused with a fascinating spirit. The worst thing is that it's 5,000 miles away from the people I love. . . . but opportunities to work on potentially groundbreaking shows cannot be overlooked. Q: Why were you attracted to this role?
NEWS
July 23, 2011 | Associated Press
OSLO, Norway - A homegrown terrorist set off a deadly explosion in downtown Oslo yesterday before heading to a summer camp dressed as a police officer to commit one of the deadliest shooting rampages in history, killing at least 80 people as terrified youths ran and even swam for their lives, police said. Police initially said about 10 had been killed at the forested camp on the island of Utoya, but some survivors said they thought the toll was much higher. Police director Oystein Maeland told reporters early today that they had discovered many more victims.
NEWS
October 16, 2009 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three hours after darkness fell, John Brown and his band of armed men approached the bridge leading over the Potomac River to the dozing town. They aimed to seize the U.S. armory, grab its thousands of rifles, and start a slave revolt that would spread across the South. It was 150 years ago today, Oct. 16, 1859. The long-haired, wild-eyed Brown was about to launch a raid that would hasten the Civil War and make him the most notorious man in America, a figure who still ignites controversy a century and a half later.
NEWS
October 18, 2005 | By Andy Borowitz
North Korean madman Kim Jong-Il created a firestorm of controversy today by naming a non-madman to succeed him as president, prompting critics to question whether his nominee possessed the qualifications to replace one of the world's most insane leaders. At a news conference in Pyongyang, the mercurial Kim introduced his hand-picked successor, Kyung Hwa Chim, who has been his personal chef for the last 35 years. But even as a beaming Kim praised his nominee's credentials, critics combed Chim's record looking for any evidence of insanity and came up empty, causing many to wonder if the seemingly sane Chim was truly qualified for the job. Speaking on condition of anonymity for fear of being thrown into the core of a nuclear reactor, one such critic said, "With all of the insane people in Kim's government, why would you pick a non-lunatic with no madman experience whatsoever?"
SPORTS
November 3, 2004 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a day when the NHL player representatives and their alternates met in Toronto to discuss issues, Flyers representative Robert Esche called NHL commissioner Gary Bettman "a madman. " Esche made his comments after the reps' meeting. "We're talking to a madman," Esche told Toronto television station Sportsnet. "A guy who has no rhyme or reason. Personally, I don't even think he is a fan of the game. "I think there are a lot of great owners out there, but there is a madman leading them down the wrong path.
NEWS
October 14, 2002 | Daily News Staff and Wire Services
On Saturday and Sunday, the Washington, D.C.,-area serial sniper slept. But it was no weekend of rest for more than 300 cops and federal agents and forensic experts amassed to muzzle a murderer. If his bloody history is a guide, they know a quiet weekend does not mean the killing is over. The sniper had stopped his killing spree the previous weekend as well, only to return last Monday to take aim at a 13-year-old boy as he stepped out of his aunt's car at the Benjamin Tasker Middle School in Bowie, Md. Today, there are eight people dead, including respected Philadelphia businessman Ken Bridges, the sniper's most recent victim gunned down at a northern Virginia gas station on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1998 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Hitler of popular imagination is either a madman or a fool. Not so the Hitler of history, according to Chester County historian John Lukacs. After surveying some 100 Hitler biographies, Lukacs concludes: "This is a man who had, like the devil, enormous abilities and enormous talents. " Contrary to received opinion, Lukacs says, Hitler was actually a pretty fair artist - not to mention an effective statesman and military leader. What's more, Lukacs recently told a gathering at Borders Book Shop in Center City, "He was a normal human being, with all of the good and the evil tendencies that are latent in human beings.
NEWS
January 13, 1998 | By Crispin Sartwell
With some trivial exceptions, I do not believe in blowing people up. But on other grounds I admire Theodore Kaczynski. We're both professor types and hermits by temperament, though he takes it a bit farther into Montana than I do. Our idea of a good time is resorting to the middle of nowhere and writing antitechnological screeds. He allegedly builds bombs, however, and I want to emphasize that I do not. I could never hope to match his craftsmanship. Kaczynski is also, supposedly, a paranoid schizophrenic incapable of forming intentions or distinguishing between good and evil.
NEWS
November 20, 1997 | By Angie Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The FBI went to great pains this week to end America's concerns that a madman brought down TWA Flight 800 on a quiet summer evening 16 months ago. But the bureau's finding that nothing criminal occurred on the flight leaves many air travelers with as much uneasiness as relief. As hundreds of thousands of people prepare for Thanksgiving flights, Chad Watkins, 25, a graphic designer in Atlanta, summed up the mixed feeling of fliers this way: "I'm glad it wasn't terrorism," he said, "but deep down inside, I think I wanted it to be criminal.
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