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NEWS
April 2, 1987 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / SARAH LEEN
The Academy of Children's Music of Fort Washington welcomed maestro Riccardo Muti, conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra, at the academy's annual spring concert on Sunday at St. Thomas Church in Fort Washington. Students of the Suzuki method, ranging from 3 to 10 years old, performed on violin, cello and piano. The music director was Robert dePasquale.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1999 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
What kind of man is Wolfgang Sawallisch? Six years into his tenure as music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra - and who knows how many months away from the announcement of his successor - many still wonder about the German gentleman-maestro. Yes, some can see that his personal style is warm but formal, that his consummate musicianship breathes easy. Sawallisch never sells a score: He lets it sell itself. Still, they wonder. He is a strong man and a brave man, a man of inordinate discipline.
NEWS
February 4, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Horror film geeks, don't abandon hope: There is a cure for Paranormal Activity-overdose. His name is Ti West. He hails from Wilmington. And soon, he'll be your hero too. West is the writer-director of the far superior minimalist suspenser House of the Devil, a retro-'80s gem that opened in October to rave reviews. Sadly, it was eclipsed at the box office by Paranormal, which came out just a month earlier and which captured the media's attention with vengeance. (Guess which flick went on to gross $107,918,810 and which $101,215?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The Concert is a breakneck melodrama that milks laughs and wrings tears. In broadest outlines, this mistaken-identity crowd pleaser is about a janitor and onetime Russian symphony conductor, Andrei Filipov (Alexei Guskov), who belatedly completes a concert that was tragically interrupted. In 1980, during the Brezhnev regime's crackdown on Jews, Filipov refused to fire Jewish musicians from the Bolshoi Orchestra. As a result, as he conducted Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto in D major , a Communist apparatchik broke Filipov's baton and his spirits.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1996 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's not often that Wolfgang Sawallisch speaks out in his role as guiding artistic force of the Philadelphia Orchestra. Unlike his predecessors, the 72-year-old maestro tends to be discreet, often silent, on institutional affairs. Even when talking to his own musicians. But on a busy Beijing afternoon near the end of the orchestra's recent three-week Asian tour, such musings pour forth freely from the orchestra's music director. How will the orchestra continue to record given a deteriorating relationship with its label, EMI, and the reduced state of the classical recording industry in general?
NEWS
June 12, 2013
Bruno Bartoletti, an orchestra conductor who was associated with the Lyric Opera of Chicago for a half-century and who championed modern opera as well as classic works, died Sunday in his native Tuscany, a day before his 87th birthday. The Maggio Musicale Fiorentino, where the maestro had served as artistic director from 1985 until 1991, said Mr. Bartoletti died at a Florence hospital after a long illness. In a career that saw Mr. Bartoletti conduct well into his 80s - he directed Giacomo Puccini's Manon Lescaut at Florence's Teatro Comunale in February 2011 - he served as the first music director of Chicago's Lyric Opera, starting as guest conductor there in 1956, when he was relatively unknown.
NEWS
February 10, 2005 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than 60 years, the Polish polkas of maestro Walter A. Ossowski, 89, of Mayfair, have entertained thousands on the radio, at festivals, concerts and records. Mr. Ossowski died last Thursday of congestive heart failure at St. John Neumann Nursing Home in the Northeast. Born and raised in Port Richmond, Mr. Ossowski began playing the violin as a youngster. He continued to study at Settlement Music School and at Mastbaum Vocational School, where he graduated in 1932. He also studied under I. Siekierka, of the Warsaw Philharmonic and Philadelphia Orchestras.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2001 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
The long wait is over. On Thursday night, just after 7, the Philadelphia Orchestra and maestro Wolfgang Sawallisch finally played the first sound in their new Kimmel Center home - a huge, reverberant C. It was the first note of Beethoven's "Coriolan" Overture, which resounded through Verizon Hall. Then came the full piece, and the suite from Stravinsky's "Firebird," played with a special sheen and gusto even though the audience hadn't arrived yet. An hour later, 2,500 patrons had filled the cello-shaped hall for an invitation-only acoustic test performance by the orchestra.
NEWS
February 28, 1994 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Last week, Philadelphia Orchestra conductor Wolfgang Sawallisch was asked if next season's concert version of the Strauss opera "Ariadne auf Naxos" was deliberately scheduled for May to insure against snow. It was a reference to his astounding pinch-hit performance on Feb. 11 when, at an impromptu free Academy of Music concert, he played the orchestral reduction of a whole Wagner program at the piano. "No, it would be much easier than Wagner - the Strauss is only scored for 36 instead of 100 players," chuckled Sawallisch.
SPORTS
February 7, 1992 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Anthony Bolden is a tenor, but someone else will have to become the next Pavarotti. Similarly, if the Philadelphia-based rhythm and blues group Boyz II Men someday needs an upright bass player, Bolden doubts he could be the answer. "I enjoy music, but I mostly take it as a hobby," Bolden said. "People who think they're good in music are a dime a dozen. But you really have to have talent. I'm not that advanced. "Academics and basketball are what's going to get me to college.
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SPORTS
March 28, 2015 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
The St. Augustine boys' lacrosse team is a magnet not just for talented players, but for fanatics and students of the game. So it's no surprise that the Hermits' defensive scheme is just a bit more advanced than most. St. Augustine's zone defense, as opposed to the more typical man-to-man, requires structure, discipline, and a better understanding of the game. If it works, the defense can dictate the flow of the game and the looks that it sees. But the players have to be smart and cohesive.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By TOM Di NARDO, For the Daily News
BEFORE tonight's Philadelphia Orchestra concert, 25 lucky students from Play On, Philly! will perform on the Kimmel Center stage in the experience of a lifetime. These members of St. Francis de Sales Firebird String Orchestra will play the first movement of Mozart's familiar "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik" ("A Little Night Music"), under the direction of Philadelphia Orchestra maestro Yannick Nezet-Seguin. Founded at West Philadelphia's St. Francis de Sales School, Play On, Philly! is the local embodiment of Venezuela's visionary El Sistema . This now-international concept has helped thousands of children improve self-esteem and personal skills while learning music at a high level.
NEWS
June 12, 2013
Bruno Bartoletti, an orchestra conductor who was associated with the Lyric Opera of Chicago for a half-century and who championed modern opera as well as classic works, died Sunday in his native Tuscany, a day before his 87th birthday. The Maggio Musicale Fiorentino, where the maestro had served as artistic director from 1985 until 1991, said Mr. Bartoletti died at a Florence hospital after a long illness. In a career that saw Mr. Bartoletti conduct well into his 80s - he directed Giacomo Puccini's Manon Lescaut at Florence's Teatro Comunale in February 2011 - he served as the first music director of Chicago's Lyric Opera, starting as guest conductor there in 1956, when he was relatively unknown.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin and David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITICS
Wolfgang Sawallisch, 89, the German maestro who defied expectations by taking the helm of the Philadelphia Orchestra at age 70 and remaking it into perhaps the most assured blend of orchestral polish and power in the United States, died Friday evening at home in Grassau outside Munich, according to a statement from the Bavarian State Opera. He had been stricken in recent years by a number of diseases and conditions. Mr. Sawallisch, only the orchestra's sixth music director in a century, succeeded the dashing, controversial Riccardo Muti in 1993.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Of the Philadelphia Orchestra's eight music directors in 112 years, none has arrived with the vessel-of-hope urgency that accompanies Yannick Nézet-Séguin. Bankruptcy and several years of organizational chaos have cast doubt on the orchestra as a going concern, and its public image has taken a beating. "Beautiful but beleaguered," wrote the New Yorker in advance of the orchestra's Carnegie Hall concert this week. "Can These Philadelphians Be Fabulous Again?" asked the Wall Street Journal.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
To view a video of the maestro and the piano-playing cat, go to:
NEWS
October 30, 2011
First the Music, Then the Words By Riccardo Muti Afterword by Marco Grondona Translated from the Italian by Alta L. Price Rizzoli. 243 pp. $29.95 Reviewed by Daniel Webster When Riccardo Muti, his transformational years with the Philadelphia Orchestra explosively behind him, strode to the podium of Italy's La Scala opera house in 1986, musicians and listeners alike cheered that Il Sceriffo , as an Italian newspaper dubbed him, had come. The avenging sheriff he was, the enforcer, almost alone among peers, his six-shooters aimed at those who sang the high E-flat instead of the B-flat Verdi had written, and at directors and singers who wanted to "improve" any operatic ür-text.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
  "Party Doll" by Buddy Knox was Michael Tearson's first record. His newest: Stuff That Works - by Michael Tearson. "The best compliment I've gotten about my album," the veteran Philly DJ says, "is that different people pick wildly different songs as their favorite. " Tearson's voice at 63 is as distinctive on CD - he sings 13 tunes, from Bob Dylan to Neil Diamond - as on radio. That's the medium where the Baltimore-area native got his start 44 years ago in Philadelphia, just as the FM revolution dawned.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Although James Levine barely made it through his 40th anniversary season at the Metropolitan Opera, he did so with his stature undiminished. What a relief. Think of the embarrassment factor had his chronic health problems taken him out completely, at a time when this critical mass of Leviniana is arriving from all sides. On Wednesday, the American Masters profile, "James Levine: America's Maestro," airs on PBS (WHYY TV12, 8 p.m.), while six area movie theaters host the Met's encore simulcast of the Levine-conducted Die Walküre . Meanwhile, a coffee-table book, James Levine: 40 Years at the Metropolitan Opera (Amadeus Press, $32)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2011 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The legal, fiscal, and organizational whirlpool pulling in attention around the Philly Pops has succeeded in obscuring an important artistic view of the group. From the stage of Verizon Hall Sunday afternoon, Peter Nero, the Pops' artistic leader, took a few humorous jabs at his parent group, the Philadelphia Orchestra Association. The current four-concert run is the last of the season, and no one can say for sure that it isn't the last ever, though fliers inserted in the program - and a competing one distributed to the audience by players - intimated hopefully that an agreement is near between the orchestra and Pops on an abbreviated 2011-12 season.
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