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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
You might think that a rock is a more powerful weapon than paper. But not in the game of rock-paper-scissors. You might think that the sleaze factor would easily overpower the whimsy factor. But not in Things Change, an offbeat fable much in the spirit of Being There. You might think the grasshopper would easily gobble the ant. But not in this collaboration of hard-boiled playwright David Mamet and soft-yolked cartoonist Shel Silverstein, respectively the creators of memorably sleazy and whimsical characters.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
SURE, the South Philly mob ain't what it used to be, but that doesn't mean that there aren't still stories to be told about La Cosa Nostra . And National Geographic has got the goods. Six hours' worth. "Inside the American Mob," a six-part series, premieres Sunday at 9 p.m. "It's the small, personal stories on both sides of the coin, from the Mafia and the prosecutors that chased them," said Michael Welsh, the series' executive producer. "You're getting multiple points of view on the same events over the course of the mob history.
SPORTS
November 2, 2011 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A Democratic congressman compared the NCAA to the Mafia over how it controls the lives of student athletes. "I think they're just one of the most vicious, most ruthless organizations ever created by mankind," Illinois Rep. Bobby Rush said of the NCAA at a congressional forum on college sports Tuesday. "I think you would compare the NCAA to Al Capone and to the Mafia. " Rush made the accusations at the forum called to look at the impact of "back-room deals, payoffs and scandals" in college sports.
NEWS
November 10, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Mafia, a fertile source of material for American writers, usually appears in plays, books or films about crime. Armand's Place may be the first work in which a Mafia don plays a role - not unexpectedly, a negative one - in a play about race relations. In this case, the Mafia gets a bad rap, and the play by Ron Schultz suffers a great loss of credibility by having a mob leader named Don Thomas Del Vecchio as a character. Armand's Place, receiving its initial production from Venture Theater, is set in a pool hall in Queens in 1974.
NEWS
July 26, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Reputed Junior Black Mafia associate Trent C. Pickard doesn't scare easily. But yesterday, Pickard had a worried look on his face just before a jury was about to enter a courtroom with a verdict in his kidnapping case. His emotional low came when more than six sheriff's deputies marched into the room and took positions against the walls. "Oh, this can't be good," defense lawyer Joseph C. Santaguida said to Pickard. But the concern was unjustified. Within minutes, Pickard, 31, was all smiles.
NEWS
August 2, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The chief of police detectives in this Sicilian capital resigned yesterday, deepening a crisis in Italy's battle against the Mafia. The resignation of Antonio Nicchi came two days after Italy's top investigator of organized crime, Giovanni Falcone, and eight fellow magistrates resigned from the "anti-Mafia pool" in Sicily, asking to be transferred. Last year Falcone won the cooperation of Tommaso Buscetta, the former gang boss, whose unprecedented revelations made possible the convictions of 19 crime bosses and hitmen and more than 300 others in Italy's biggest judicial assault ever on the Mafia.
NEWS
October 4, 1986 | By Murray Kempton
Angelo Lonardo is the eldest and loftiest statesman of the Mafia to have bound himself over to the federal prosecutors as certified authority on its secrets. Lonardo was an underboss of the Honored Society's Cleveland family in 1980 when he was sentenced to life without parole with 103 extra years thrown in after being convicted of narcotics dealings he still swears he never touched. He was in his 70s by then, and whatever strength of character had qualified him for his great office was so enfeebled that a year in prison was enough to set him crying mercy to the FBI. Lonardo completed his metropolitan debut as a government witness at the trial of six paladins of the Mafia's presumed ruling commission one day last week.
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
If the daily movie listings are as comprehensive as we like to think they are, Oliver Stone's "JFK" seems to have slipped into the black void that exists somewhere out there beyond the reaches of the most remote country drive-ins. And still the interest Stone revived in the November 1963 slaying of President John F. Kennedy continues to dominate mail and phone traffic into this office. From an address modestly removed from the glitter of the "Strip" in Las Vegas, a retired U.S. Army career noncom informs me he has the names and nationalities of a trio of former French Foreign Legionnaires who were recruited in Damascus, Syria, and flown over here to assassinate Kennedy for a collective bounty in excess of $60,000 plus expenses.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In the matter of Spike Fumo, a kid from Brooklyn best described as street- dumb, it is possible for honest men and women to have a difference of opinion. Not to mention dishonest men and women. In the candid appraisal of Baldo Cacetti, the Mafia chieftain who rules the Bensonhurst section, Spike is "a loser. Face facts. His dad's a jailbird, his old lady's a dyke, and Spike ain't got no future. " In the kinder opinion of Angel Cacetti, his Mafia princess of a daughter, Spike is just another "dumb Italian guy, but he is cute.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Jennifer Parmelee, Washington Post
It's a multinational organization that boasts staggering profits, gilt- edged connections, managers with advanced degrees, a vast workforce known for ruthless efficiency - and, like many other enterprises, a hungry eye for the profits to be had when Europe unites economically by the end of 1992. Most people know it as the Mafia. Long classified as a "local problem" of southern Italy, the Mafia is increasingly recognized today as a powerful criminal - and economic - phenomenon that not only threatens the rest of Italy, but also all of Europe and beyond.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
I wonder whether it's possible to make a bad John le Carré movie: Every one of the 15 films and miniseries based on his espionage thrillers is well worth watching. There are the masterpieces, including Martin Ritt's The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965) and the BBC's 1979 miniseries, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy . But even the weakest films - the 1984 terrorism romance The Little Drummer Girl and the 1990 Cold War love story The Russia House - still outstrip most spy movies.
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Federal authorities charged a pioneer in the multibillion-dollar payday-loan industry Thursday in the Justice Department's latest and largest case aimed at stifling abusive lenders who have evaded state and federal regulation with stunning efficiency. Prosecutors allege that Charles M. Hallinan - a 75-year-old former investment banker, a Wharton School graduate, and a Main Line resident - dodged each new law meant to stifle usurious loans by paying established banks and Native American tribes to serve as fronts for his loan companies.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THE LOCAL Ironworkers union under longtime leader Joseph Dougherty didn't function like a legitimate labor union, but acted like the mob, federal prosecutors say. "Both criminal enterprises existed and operated through a pattern of fear, violence, and intimidation," Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert Livermore wrote in a trial memorandum filed yesterday. "Both criminal enterprises used that well-earned fear to extort money from businesses. " Dougherty, 73, of Bustleton, business manager of Ironworkers Local 401 from 1998 until early last year, faces trial in federal court starting Monday on charges of racketeering conspiracy, arson-related offenses and extortion.
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
LANCASTER - For a year, Lark and Michael McCarley simmered silently over the arrival of Amish Mafia in their community. The couple own Lovelace Manor, a bed-and-breakfast on the outskirts of town, and found the reality show that depicts black-clothed young men terrorizing neighbors distasteful, offensive and an affront to their many Amish friends. The final straw was the phone call last winter from a TV producer who wanted to blow up a vehicle in the small parking lot behind their restored Second Empire mansion, next to the aviary housing several prized doves.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2013 | The Inquirer Staff
'Amish' star assaulted   Esther Schmucker , one of the cast of Discovery Channel's reality-TV show Amish Mafia , was beaten severely by her bf early Halloween morning. Results: broken cheekbone, nose, and teeth. That's according to Strasburg, Pa., police, who issued a felony arrest warrant Sunday for Imir "Mirkat" Williams . (He's not on the show.) Schmucker has repeatedly sought protection-from-abuse orders against Williams. They were signed by judges, but dropped when Schmucker failed to appear in court.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
SURE, the South Philly mob ain't what it used to be, but that doesn't mean that there aren't still stories to be told about La Cosa Nostra . And National Geographic has got the goods. Six hours' worth. "Inside the American Mob," a six-part series, premieres Sunday at 9 p.m. "It's the small, personal stories on both sides of the coin, from the Mafia and the prosecutors that chased them," said Michael Welsh, the series' executive producer. "You're getting multiple points of view on the same events over the course of the mob history.
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Nicole Winfield and Colleen Barry, Associated Press
ROME - Giulio Andreotti personified the nation he helped shape, the good and the bad. One of Italy's most important postwar figures, he helped draft the country's constitution after World War II, served seven times as premier, and spent 60 years in Parliament. But the Christian Democrat who was friends with popes and cardinals was also a controversial figure who survived corruption scandals and allegations of aiding the Mafia: Mr. Andreotti was accused of exchanging a "kiss of honor" with the mob's longtime No. 1 boss and was indicted in what was called "the trial of the century" in Palermo.
NEWS
March 24, 2013
A Portrait of Italy's Most Powerful Mafia By Petra Reski Nation Books, 269 pp. $16.99 paperback Reviewed by George Anastasia A year after Mafia boss Bernardo Provenzano was arrested, I was in Sicily on vacation with my wife and other family members. Provenzano, known as "Binnie the Tractor," was taken into custody in April 2006, after 42 years on the run. He was found in a farmhouse in a small village near Corleone, where he had grown up and where his wife still lived.
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | Reviewed by George Anastasia
Mafia Summit J. Edgar Hoover, the Kennedy Brothers, and the Meeting That Unmasked the Mob By Gil Reavill Thomas Dunne Books. 304 pp. $26.99   It is a quintessential event in the history of the American Mafia. On Nov. 14, 1957, dozens of mob figures, including some of the biggest bosses in the country, gathered in the home of Joseph Barbara in the tiny hamlet of Apalachin in Upstate New York. Barbara, a mob soldier, had stocked his country estate with loads of provisions, including 20 10-pound boxes of top-grade steaks and two 10-pound boxes of veal.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
HOW DO YOU convince jurors that the Mafia is a menace when nobody got hurt? How do you even keep them all awake after nearly three months? That was the challenge facing Assistant U.S. Attorney John Han on Thursday as the marathon trial of reputed Philadelphia mob boss Joseph "Uncle Joe" Ligambi and six associates entered the closing-argument stage. Describing La Cosa Nostra as the IBM and General Electric of the criminal underworld, Han spent more than three hours explaining the structure of the Philly mob and how it has profited from its reputation for violence - even if no overt acts of violence are included in the latest indictment.
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