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Mahogany

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NEWS
August 22, 1991 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
Meanwhile, back at the branch - Family Court's Domestic Relations Branch, that is - new furniture has become a source of complaint. Some employees are upset about having to bring paper from home to use in the court's copying machines. There appears to be a paper shortage. Turning their gaze upon the fancy new furniture that the top brass has bought for itself, these irritated court workers might ask, "Who put the hog in mahogany?" The story is that when the branch moved to a new facility on South 11th Street last spring, branch managers decided to buy new furniture.
SPORTS
May 24, 1986 | Special to The Inquirer / ART WILKINSON
Showing winning form, Craig Shegog, 16, of Upper Saddle River, N.J., and his mount, Mahogany Run, jump over a gate during the opening day of the 90th annual Devon Horse Show. Shegog was one of three winners in his class yesterday at the show, which runs through May 31.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Moving from New York to Florida, John Wanamaker Leas - the last of the line to be named after the famous Philadelphia merchant - couldn't pass up the chance to spend a weekend showing off the city of his birth to his fiancee. Big mistake. Around 8:15 Saturday night, after introducing his bride-to-be, Susan Hussey, to a cheesesteak and touring the 1911 flagship store built by his grandfather, "Captain John" Wanamaker Jr., the couple returned to the Clinton Street bed-and-breakfast where they were staying and discovered that their rented, loaded, bright-yellow moving truck was gone.
NEWS
April 6, 1990 | Special to The Inquirer
Occasionally, if you're lucky, you might find a place big enough to rest an elbow or fill out a check, and maybe even a pen that writes, at one of those automated bank tellers. But at the MAC machine in the Capitol, it's a different story. The state recently installed a mahogany wall desk. "The House chief clerk requested it," said Pamela DiSalvo, press secretary for the Department of General Services. "Apparently a lot of people had mentioned it would be nice. It's easier to fill out your little envelopes and things with something to write on. " The desktop is 14 by 30 inches, and the main piece, which is screwed into the wall, stands about four feet high.
NEWS
April 29, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL MALLY
When George Washington moved to Philadelphia in 1789, he brought his French desk with him. Almost 200 years later, Mervin B. Martin has restored the 500- pound mahogany desk, which was donated to the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in 1867. Along with his apprentice, John Viarengo, Martin painstakingly refinished and rebuilt the desk. It will go on display when the society opens its "Inheriting America" exhibition next year.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL VIOLA
Consider the possibilities, shoppers: 33 oak and mahogany desks, 40 telephones, 164 calculators, motorized drafting tables and 108 typewriters, all of which go on sale at 9 a.m. today at the U.S. Postal Service's Equipment Facility at Tenth Street and Pattison Avenue. The occasion is the first auction of excess postal equipment at the Philadelphia Division of the Postal Service. In all, hundreds of used and surplus items, right down to pencil sharpeners and doormats, will be for sale.
NEWS
December 9, 2013 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I've always been addicted to garage sales and flea markets, but it turns out they were gateway drugs. Now I'm hooked on auctions. We begin a year ago, when I noticed there was an antiques auction in my neighborhood and I stopped by. I'm no antiques expert, but I like old things. Like me. So I walked into the auction, took a seat, and watched as the auctioneer showed slides of great furniture. Most of it was from the Philadelphia area, circa 1800s. People made bids by raising white cards, and when the bidding stopped, the prices weren't high at all. Surprise ending, right?
NEWS
October 15, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
HIS HOME WAS HIS CASTLE - NOT TO MENTION HIS FORTRESS Thinking of redecorating? How about a 1960s mob motif? For anyone into mahogany, velvet and big furniture, the home furnishings of the late reputed mobster Tony "Big Tuna" Accardo may be just the thing. And for anyone who doesn't have much to say to guests, Accardo's round banquet table - it seats 70 - could become quite a conversation piece. Then there's the 11-foot velvet sofa, velvet lounge and chairs, an inlaid mahogany conference table and a large mahogany desk.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2012 | By Dan Gross
NBC NEWS Foreign Correspondent Michelle Kosinski and area businessman Carlos Hoz de Vina have recently split. We told you in July that the Cinnaminson native Kosinski, and the auto mogul had been dating for about a year. Kosinski, recently in town with friends at Rouge (205 S. 18th), splits her time between London, Miami and New York. We hear she's now seeing a man in Europe where a friend of hers says men "Make a thousand times more effort than Americans.
NEWS
November 19, 1988 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
You're a do-it-yourselfer who's just bought this great little trinity shell, and now you're ready to rebuild. Your first stop? William F. Comly & Son, the huge auction house just off Kensington and Allegheny. At 10 a.m. Tuesday, it will be offering you not only the building materials you will need - from dimensional lumber, including cedar and mahogany, to cabinets - but also some of the tools to do the work. There are dozens of sheets of drywall, and to hang it on, at least two lots of dimensional 2-by-4 studs, with about 250 2-by-4s per lot. To attach the drywall to the studs, there are several hundred boxes of drywall nails (no drywall screws, however, although builders these days tend to prefer them)
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NEWS
December 9, 2013 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I've always been addicted to garage sales and flea markets, but it turns out they were gateway drugs. Now I'm hooked on auctions. We begin a year ago, when I noticed there was an antiques auction in my neighborhood and I stopped by. I'm no antiques expert, but I like old things. Like me. So I walked into the auction, took a seat, and watched as the auctioneer showed slides of great furniture. Most of it was from the Philadelphia area, circa 1800s. People made bids by raising white cards, and when the bidding stopped, the prices weren't high at all. Surprise ending, right?
REAL_ESTATE
July 15, 2013 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
The inside of the brick rowhouse on South 18th Street is furnished so minimally, it makes a Shaker dwelling seem opulent. "I'm a little compulsive about having things in order," Anthony Esposito says with a laugh. But the clean lines and muted color palette throughout lend an elegant serenity as soothing as a Zen garden. It took two major overhauls in six years to get it into its present incarnation, the result of love, sorrow, and endurance. When Anthony and his wife, Paula, bought their Packer Park house in October 2005, things could not have felt more blissful.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Phrases like "a musician's musician" and "a singer's singer" normally seem restrictive. Such acclaim can pigeonhole an artist, creating an air of insular complexity unappealing to the general public. Saying as much about vocalist Kevin Mahogany could never be such a slight. With a big, supple voice, blue swing styling, and an easygoing way with any rhythm placed before him, Mahogany has long been a critical darling and a crowd-pleaser. Currently, he can be found thrilling crowds with the good groove material of Next Time You See Me , his collaboration with his guitarist pal Dave Stryker and his organ trio.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2012 | By Dan Gross
NBC NEWS Foreign Correspondent Michelle Kosinski and area businessman Carlos Hoz de Vina have recently split. We told you in July that the Cinnaminson native Kosinski, and the auto mogul had been dating for about a year. Kosinski, recently in town with friends at Rouge (205 S. 18th), splits her time between London, Miami and New York. We hear she's now seeing a man in Europe where a friend of hers says men "Make a thousand times more effort than Americans.
REAL_ESTATE
April 24, 2011 | By David P. King, For The Inquirer
When Joanne and George Baltaeff were getting married three years ago, they decided that celebrating their new life together called for moving out of old homes and making a new one. The house-hunting began one snowy afternoon, when Joanne made arrangements with a Realtor to see six properties for sale. It ended about 20 minutes later, when she fell in love with the first one, a three-bedroom/three-bath house on a quiet street in Springfield, Delaware County. "I was working a lot, and she was saying we should find a house," George says.
LIVING
August 21, 2009 | By Shannon T. Curley FOR THE INQUIRER
Dorothy may have thought that there was no place like her Kansas home, but Bernard and Audrey Johnson Thornton are positive that their two-bedroom apartment on the 10th floor of the Alden Park apartment complex is truly unique. The entrance to their home in the complex's Kenilworth Building is not unusual. A wreath hangs on the door and a welcome mat awaits those who enter. But once inside the large foyer, beneath a mahogany archway and vaulted ceilings, their home's special features are visible.
LIVING
April 17, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Two high-end catalog auctions next weekend will offer major collections of Philadelphia Empire furniture, Russian enamels, and avant-garde ceramics that turn clay into such diverse objects as a garbage pail and a mad scientist. The three dozen lots of furniture in Philadelphia Empire and related styles will be offered by Pook & Pook Inc. on April 25 at the second session of a two-day, 750-lot sale of fine art, furniture, and decorative accessories beginning at 10 a.m. at its Downingtown gallery.
LIVING
October 3, 2008 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
With a bronze bear, a Meissen rhinoceros, a turtle-shaped inkstand, and a set of four Russian silver stirrup cups shaped like stag's heads among its more than 900 lots, Freeman's two-day sale next week of fine English and Continental furniture, silver and decorative arts will have a positively zoological flair. The furniture even includes a Viennese giraffe piano, so-called because it has a vertical rather than a horizontal soundboard. The instrument will be offered at the auction's second session, beginning at 10 a.m. Wednesday at the gallery, 1808 Chestnut St. Made about 1815 by Martin Seuffert with a gilt and ebonized exterior, the piano is expected to sell for $8,000 to $12,000, according to the auction catalog.
NEWS
July 30, 2008 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Doug Mooberry was a boy, he enjoyed working with his hands. He had a talent for taking things apart and fixing them. When he was a student at Unionville High, he rushed through his biology class each afternoon so he could spend more time in the wood shop. At Gettysburg College, he majored in something practical - business - but his intellect was attracted to Greek and Roman history. He was fascinated by how the present is inflected by the past. When he graduated, he was certain of one thing: He did not want to be a corporate nomad like his father, a DuPont executive.
LIVING
May 16, 2008 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Auctions between today and Thursday will offer fine furniture, garden and farm equipment, and American Indian baskets. They all require a little traveling. The furniture will be featured at two sales. Beginning at 5 p.m. today in Garnet Valley, Briggs Auction will feature antique and reproduction furniture, including an Empire mahogany chest on ball-and-claw feet, two inlaid mahogany bedroom sets, one with a highboy, and a mahogany Gov. Winthrop desk. The 1,500-lots sale also includes country antiques and collectibles.
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