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Mail Fraud

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NEWS
January 16, 1992 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Acquitted yesterday of mail fraud, prominent criminal lawyer A. Charles Peruto Jr. offered advice for the federal authorities that prosecuted him. "Go after criminals," Peruto, 36, deadpanned to a crowd of reporters in the lobby of the U.S. courthouse before walking outside into the cold, a free man. Peruto, whose name has popped up in a number of headline-grabbing cases in the dozen years he's been a lawyer, was charged with cheating the...
NEWS
March 28, 1989 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Roofers Union-tarred Common Pleas Judge Joseph P. Braig has agreed to plead guilty to allegations that he cheated an insurance company out of more than $7,000 to help pay for renovations to his girlfriend's Queen Village house, a source said. In return for the plea to mail fraud, the government agreed to drop charges that the judge extorted $500 from then-Roofers chief Stephen Traitz Jr. in 1985. The state Supreme Court last month cleared Braig of ethical wrongdoing in taking the cash, saying it was a Christmas gift from now-convicted briber Traitz.
NEWS
January 9, 1997 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A 59-year-old Cherry Hill accountant was indicted yesterday on charges of mail fraud for allegedly cheating his clients out of $655,000, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Newark. Howard A. Dudnick, of the 100 block of En Provence Court, was charged with 12 counts of mail fraud involving a scheme to raise money for a bogus school bond. If convicted, Dudnick could face five years in federal prison and a $250,000 fine for each count, Assistant U.S. Attorney John Peter Suarez said.
NEWS
March 27, 1986 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Montgomery County securities dealer was charged yesterday with defrauding 21 of his clients out of about $750,000 by depositing their investment money into his personal bank accounts. Harry N. Daylor, 70, of Laurelwood Road, Pottstown, was charged by the U.S. attorney's office with five counts of mail fraud in the alleged scheme. If convicted, he will face a maximum penalty of 25 years in prison and a $503,000 fine. According to the charges, Daylor, a sales representative for the national securities firm IDS Financial Services, solicited thousands of dollars from individuals from June 1978 through April 1985 for investment in a tax-exempt bond fund, and then kept the money without informing IDS of the transactions.
NEWS
June 25, 1987 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
In a decision that will make it tougher to convict corrupt public officials, the Supreme Court yesterday invalidated a legal doctrine that has been used for years to imprison scores of governors, judges, city councilmen, congressmen and others for fraud. The justices, departing from the lower courts' uniformly broad interpretations of the federal mail fraud statute, ruled 7-2 that the law cannot be used to prosecute defendants for defrauding citizens of their "intangible rights" to honest and impartial government.
NEWS
July 24, 2012
  A former city court employee allegedly made $433,000 in purchases using court funds to enrich himself, his family, and his friends, federal prosecutors said Monday. William Rullo, 47, of Levittown, was charged with mail fraud and faces a maximum 20 years in prison. Rullo worked in the procurement department of the First Judicial District and used a court credit card, a check, and forged invoices for his personal benefit, federal prosecutors said. Among the items and services allegedly purchased by Rullo: 36 plasma and LCD televisions, monthly service for eight mobile phones used by family members and friends, $35,000 in monthly parking passes that he resold to friends and coworkers, and $1,300 in SEPTA tokens that he resold at a discount.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | by Steve Esack, Daily News Staff Writer
The 19-count federal indictment against Camden Mayor Milton Milan charges the city's first Hispanic mayor with bribery, attempted extortion, wire fraud, mail fraud, conspiracy and money laundering. The indictment, which was unsealed yesterday in Camden, accuses Milan of two primary illegal acts: using his office repeatedly to receive payments or favors from individuals and firms, and taking bribes from Philadelphia-based La Cosa Nostra. Here are some highlights of the indictment: Accepting more than $30,000 in bribes from the Philadelphia mob under the orders of former mob boss - turned "King Rat" - Ralph Natale.
NEWS
June 2, 1992 | By Emilie Lounsberry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A lawyer who formerly worked at the Philadelphia Housing Authority was charged yesterday with income-tax evasion and stealing a $15,000 lawsuit settlement from a private client. Marlene Joseph, 52, of the 1200 block of Norwalk Road in Philadelphia, was charged with one count of mail fraud and two counts of tax evasion for 1987 and 1988. The charges identified Joseph as the minority-business-enterprise and equal-employment-opportunity officer at the housing authority, but Assistant U.S. Attorneys Barry Gross and William B. Carr Jr. said the charges were not based on her activities as a PHA employee.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Common Pleas Court Judge Joseph P. Braig pleaded guilty to mail fraud yesterday in U.S. District Court, admitting that he filed an inflated insurance claim for wind and water damage to his Queen Village home in 1983. Under the terms of a plea agreement, the U.S. Attorney's Office agreed to drop a federal extortion charge alleging that Braig received $500 in cash from Roofers Union leader Stephen J. Traitz Jr. in December 1985. Standing solemnly before U.S. District Judge Norma L. Shapiro, Braig, 52, answered, "Guilty, Your Honor," to each of three counts of mail fraud.
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NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Mark Fazlollah, and Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writers
Federal prosecutors on Wednesday accused U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah of using his campaign coffers, charities he created, and federal grant funds he controlled to bankroll a failed 2007 Philadelphia mayoral bid, and line the pockets of family members and close political allies. The 11-term Democratic congressman, who holds a seat on the powerful Appropriations Committee, was charged in a 29-count racketeering conspiracy indictment that alleges he channeled hundreds of thousands of dollars to pay off an illegal $1 million campaign loan as well as the college debts of son Chaka "Chip" Fattah Jr. In addition, federal authorities said, Fattah, 58, accepted bribes including stacks of cash, payments toward a Poconos vacation home, and college tuition for an au pair from a lobbyist seeking his help to land an ambassadorship with the Obama White House.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | BY JENNIFER WRIGHT, Daily News Staff Writer wrightj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
FORMER TRAFFIC Court Judge Fortunato Perri Sr. will get no jail time for his involvement in the ticket-fixing scandal that brought down Philadelphia Traffic Court. Perri, 78, yesterday was sentenced to two years probation and a $4,000 fine. He accepted gifts such as seafood and car repairs in exchange for dismissing traffic violations. In 2013, he pleaded guilty to four charges: conspiracy, mail fraud and two counts of wire fraud. "I would just like to say I'm sorry for the trouble I caused, and I apologize to the court," Perri said during the sentencing.
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former longtime owner of the historic Bucks County Playhouse was found guilty Friday by a federal jury of claiming more than $200,000 in fraudulent insurance payments after a 2006 flood devastated the property, prosecutors said. Ralph Miller could face up to 30 years in prison for convictions on counts of money laundering and mail fraud, said Assistant U.S. Attorney K.T. Newton. Miller, who for three decades owned the theater along the Delaware River in New Hope, was accused of submitting false invoices for expensive theater lights and emergency repair work after the 2006 flood, Newton said.
NEWS
March 5, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once a Democratic fund-raising wheeler-dealer who counted mayors and congressmen as friends, Samuel G. Kuttab took a hit to his reputation when a 2002 tax-evasion case sent him to federal prison for two years. His political fortunes appeared poised to sink further Tuesday as he pleaded guilty to charges involving the use of his influence to sway a civil lawsuit in his favor. In a hearing before U.S. District Judge Juan R. Sanchez Jr., Kuttab, 55, said that in 2011, he enlisted the aid of then-Municipal Court Judge Joseph C. Waters Jr. to fix the case.
NEWS
January 7, 2015 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
RETIRED Delaware County Senior Magisterial District Judge Kenneth Miller will serve no time in prison for his part in the Philadelphia Traffic Court ticket-fixing scandal. A federal judge who sentenced Miller yesterday said he regarded him as less blameworthy than other judges ensnared in the sweeping corruption probe. U.S. District Judge Michael Kelly sentenced Miller to one year of probation and fined him $1,000 for his involvement in the scandal that knocked the city's Traffic Court out of commission.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
STANDING BEFORE U.S. District Judge Juan Sanchez, former Municipal Judge Joseph C. Waters Jr., 61, pleaded guilty yesterday to one count of mail fraud and one count of honest-services wire fraud. "Are you guilty of committing these crimes?" Sanchez asked. "Yes, your honor, I am," Waters responded. Yesterday's plea came on the heels of Waters' immediate voluntary resignation from the bench, which he submitted Tuesday. Waters had been under federal investigation for more than a year, and charges were brought yesterday in the form of a document called an information, as opposed to an indictment.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers for five former Philadelphia Traffic Court judges accused in a years-long ticket fixing conspiracy renewed their attacks Friday on the case against their clients, saying it was built upon "stupid assumptions, stupid guesses and stupid speculation. " That last line - courtesy of William McSwain, who represents Mark A. Bruno, a Chester County magistrate also charged in the case - came as the lawyer accused federal prosecutors and the FBI of interpreting even the judges' most innocent actions in a criminal light.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
The founder of a chain of day-care centers in Philadelphia was indicted Monday in federal court on charges of stealing money intended to feed low-income children. Tracey Parson, 44, of Sicklerville, Camden County, also was charged with filing a bogus lawsuit against Philadelphia radio personality Tarsha "Jonesy" Jones that allowed Parson to receive a "substantial" settlement from the company that owns Power 99 and led to the reported firing of Jones. Parson founded Kiddie Kare Child Care & Education Center Inc. in 2008 and allegedly conspired with others to defraud the government for more than 21/2 years, from around December 2009 until June 2012, prosecutors said.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A VETERAN federal prosecutor passionately told a judge yesterday that Alex Pugman, a leading defendant in a Medicare fraud case, "was without a doubt the most exceptional cooperator I have worked with. " Pugman, who was the director and co-owner of the now-defunct Home Care Hospice in Northeast Philly, helped explain the roles of other participants in the scheme, pointed out the fraud in the agency's records, and testified at two grand juries and at three trials, Assistant U.S. Attorney Suzanne Ercole said.
NEWS
May 21, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Chester County company was charged Monday with defrauding Philadelphia of more than $500,000 through inflated billings for unapproved products, federal prosecutors said. Airmatic Inc. of Malvern, which had contracts with the city to supply industrial products and repair parts, is charged with one count of mail fraud. The company was charged in an information, which generally indicates a defendant is expected to plead guilty. Airmatic faces a maximum sentence of five years' probation, court-ordered restitution, a fine of $500,000 or twice the company's alleged illegal profit, and a $400 special assessment.
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