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NEWS
September 20, 1989 | By Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Dorrance Rowe, a mailman so fond of the people on his route that after his retirement he still went back to visit them, died Sunday. He was 77 and lived in Germantown. "They liked his insults better than their mail. If Dorrance was fond of you, he would call you crooked, accuse you of being a hoodlum, or call you ugly to your face," said his brother, Gilbert. Dorrance Rowe, like humorist Will Rogers, never met a man he didn't like, so his inventory of jokes, insults and one-liners was legendary.
SPORTS
December 19, 1991 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
If Isiah Thomas is named to the U.S. Olympic team, Karl Malone says he not only would welcome the Detroit Pistons' guard, he'd room with him. "I'd be Isiah's roommate," said Malone, the Utah Jazz's 6-9 forward who's already on the U.S. roster for the games in Barcelona, Spain, next summer. "I don't hold a grudge. If I have something happen with somebody, I can apologize. I'll apologize to Isiah as soon as everybody stops making a big deal out of it. " Malone had nothing to apologize for last night.
SPORTS
March 9, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Gordan Giricek scored 21 points to lead Utah past the Los Angeles Lakers, 88-83, welcoming back Karl Malone by beating his new team last night in The Mailman's first trip to Utah as a visitor. The shorthanded Lakers never recovered after Shaquille O'Neal was thrown out with two quick technical fouls in the fourth quarter. Los Angeles led by 72-68 at the time, but the Jazz scored 20 points in the final 3:57. Malone, who is on the injured list with a bad knee, made the trip but was not activated for the game.
NEWS
August 2, 2012
A Cherry Hill residence was robbed Tuesday afternoon after a man disguised as a postal worker forced his way inside and was joined by three accomplices, township police said. The fake mailman, who wore a uniform, knocked on a door on the 1100 block of Society Hill Boulevard around 12:30 p.m. and was greeted by a female occupant who thought he was delivering a package. He pushed his way in and was followed by the other assailants, two armed with handguns, police said. The men tied up the resident and her brother with belts and tape, and ransacked the home, getting away with cash and jewelry, they said.
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew J. Nolan Sr., 91, of Gloucester City, a decorated U.S. Marine veteran of World War II and "everyone's favorite mailman," died Monday, Nov. 5, at a Moorestown rehab center after a fall. Born to Martin and Katherine Nolan, Mr. Nolan was one of 10 children. He graduated in 1938 from Gloucester Catholic High School, where he played baseball and basketball and was president of the Junior Guild. On Jan. 15, 1942, Mr. Nolan enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps to fight in World War II. He was shot three times in the face during the Battle of Guadalcanal and wore a glass eye. After a year recovering in the Naval Hospital at Camp Pendleton in California, he returned home to a hero's welcome.
NEWS
November 9, 1988 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
You linger your little hour and are gone, And still the woods sweep leafily on, Not even missing the coral-root flower You took as a trophy of the hour. "On Going Unnoticed," Robert Frost The poet laureate of Bucks County walked the quiet streets of Langhorne this week, delivering his daily mail. He did not go unnoticed. The barber at Vince's Barber Shop noticed him. The woman who answered her doorbell about a C.O.D. package noticed him. The homeowner driving a leaf- sweeper across his lawn noticed him. And the mailman noticed them.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Jack Tomczuk, Inquirer Staff Writer
James A. O'Connor Jr., 82, a veteran of the wars in Korea and Vietnam, died Sunday, Oct. 4, at Abington Memorial Hospital. No cause of death has been established, said his daughter Karol Mooney. Mooney said her father, who served 21 years in the military and was a letter carrier for 25 years, never wanted to be rich and was content with his life. She called him "a great dad and a wonderful Pop-Pop. " Open and friendly, he was one to give solid, reliable advice, she said. "He prided himself as the one that you can always count on, no matter what you needed.
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
The postman only rang once. As Annie Ruth Mitchell struggled to the barred porch door of her Brewerytown home yesterday mailman Paul (Just like the movie star) Newman could see she wasn't well. Then she collapsed. Despite the fact it was the first of the month, the day Social Security checks arrive and Newman had plenty of mail to deliver, he stopped during rounds to help. Newman, 29, rushed to neighbors on 30th Street near Jefferson hoping someone had a key to Mitchell's door but ended up climbing across a neighbor's porch roof into a bedroom of Mitchell's house and running down the stairs to her aid. Fire Rescue took Mitchell, 60, to Medical College of Pennsylvania Hospital, where she was in guarded condition.
SPORTS
December 19, 1991 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Charles Barkley lingered in the locker room longer than usual. Sat there glumly, wearing a brand-new jacket that he said cost $4,000. Sat there rerunning the 76ers' last two possessions against the Utah Jazz last night, and all that mattered was that the first became a turnover, the second a missed shot. Sat there until his coach, Jim Lynam, emerged from his office. Stayed long enough to drape an arm around Lynam and say, "Jimmy, I'm sorry. " He was sorry he had been unable to deliver, sorry that the Sixers had lost, 107-105.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2003 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Absolutely nothing prepared Shawn McBride for literary success. A product of Holmesburg, a resident still, he doesn't come from a family of readers, unless you count the mail. His grandfather was a mailman. His father is a mailman. For two years, McBride was a mailman, working Tacony and North Philadelphia. He didn't grow up in a community of readers, either. "My friends aren't readers," says McBride, 31. "My friends are drinkers. " He never had a mentor, took a workshop, knew a writer.
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NEWS
December 24, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Staff Writer
MAYBE SAM SMITH was familiar with the Postal Service credo: "Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds. " Whether he knew it or not, he lived it. Sam was a letter carrier in Southwest Philadelphia, where his customers swore they could set their watches by his arrival with the mail. "Many joked about how he was the only letter-carrier that no matter how hot the summer sun blazed, he never broke a sweat while in complete uniform from top to bottom with long-sleeve shirt and tie and shoes militarily spit-shined daily," his family said in a tribute.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Jack Tomczuk, Inquirer Staff Writer
James A. O'Connor Jr., 82, a veteran of the wars in Korea and Vietnam, died Sunday, Oct. 4, at Abington Memorial Hospital. No cause of death has been established, said his daughter Karol Mooney. Mooney said her father, who served 21 years in the military and was a letter carrier for 25 years, never wanted to be rich and was content with his life. She called him "a great dad and a wonderful Pop-Pop. " Open and friendly, he was one to give solid, reliable advice, she said. "He prided himself as the one that you can always count on, no matter what you needed.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph A. Dewechter, a mail carrier in Gloucester City from the mid-1950s to the mid-1980s, "was an old-time carrier that everybody loved," said Joseph Townsend, a mailman there these days. "Joe never wore shorts," as is the style for many carriers. "He wore the long pants through the summer, winter. " And, Townsend said, Mr. Dewechter used an old leather bag, "the kind that went out with the horses. " Townsend laughed and added: "The last of the Mohicans. " On Tuesday, Nov. 4, Mr. Dewechter, 89, of Gloucester City, died of cardiac arrest at Cooper University Hospital in Camden.
NEWS
December 2, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas Charles Callan Jr., 78, of Pennsauken, a former USO singer and retired mail carrier, died Wednesday, Nov. 28, of metastatic bladder cancer. Raised in Philadelphia the oldest of nine children of Bernice and Thomas Callan Sr., Mr. Callan began singing with the USO in the 1950s. During that time, he was paired in duets with Beulah (Max) Keefe, with whom he fell in love and whom he married in 1956. They were married for 41 years until Keefe's death in 1997. In the early years of his marriage, Mr. Callan was drafted into the Army, where he obtained his GED diploma.
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew J. Nolan Sr., 91, of Gloucester City, a decorated U.S. Marine veteran of World War II and "everyone's favorite mailman," died Monday, Nov. 5, at a Moorestown rehab center after a fall. Born to Martin and Katherine Nolan, Mr. Nolan was one of 10 children. He graduated in 1938 from Gloucester Catholic High School, where he played baseball and basketball and was president of the Junior Guild. On Jan. 15, 1942, Mr. Nolan enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps to fight in World War II. He was shot three times in the face during the Battle of Guadalcanal and wore a glass eye. After a year recovering in the Naval Hospital at Camp Pendleton in California, he returned home to a hero's welcome.
NEWS
August 2, 2012
A Cherry Hill residence was robbed Tuesday afternoon after a man disguised as a postal worker forced his way inside and was joined by three accomplices, township police said. The fake mailman, who wore a uniform, knocked on a door on the 1100 block of Society Hill Boulevard around 12:30 p.m. and was greeted by a female occupant who thought he was delivering a package. He pushed his way in and was followed by the other assailants, two armed with handguns, police said. The men tied up the resident and her brother with belts and tape, and ransacked the home, getting away with cash and jewelry, they said.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2009 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Between Muhlenberg College and Temple University Law School, Jim Francis learned what became a valuable lesson: Things can go badly wrong with America's complex credit-reporting system, and it's not always easy for consumers to solve them. Francis had dutifully left a forwarding address when he moved to Philadelphia from Allentown, but one of his bills went astray. By the time it caught up with him, his payment was overdue. The late payment became a blot on his good name. As a budding lawyer, Francis thought he could solve the problem with a well-crafted letter to the credit bureau in question.
NEWS
August 7, 2008 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John "Bud" Rodgers, 90, who put his stamp on Ardmore by delivering mail there for half a century - never without a smile on his face - died July 22 at Broomall Nursing Home of complications from a stroke. Mr. Rodgers, who grew up in Ardmore and lived in Drexel Hill for nearly 60 years, began his career as a letter carrier in 1937, when stamps cost 3 cents and a postcard could be mailed for a penny. He continued to deliver mail out of the post office in Ardmore until Sept. 1, 1987, just short of his 70th birthday and a day chronicled by The Inquirer.
NEWS
July 28, 2006 | By Julie Shaw INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In her most recent attack, Alveda Tolliver said she stabbed a mailman because she wanted to kill him, police say. In 1990, she murdered a woman who let her live in her house. And, as a teen, she beat up two teachers, one of whom was pregnant. Now, Tolliver, 43, will face trial again - this time accused of trying to stab the postal carrier to death in June. At a preliminary hearing yesterday, Municipal Court Judge Marsha Neifield held Tolliver for trial on charges of attempted murder, aggravated assault and related offenses.
NEWS
May 3, 2005 | By Steve Gerben
You have a dog. Fantastic. If, however, you believe that it "loves everyone," then I encourage you to test this ferocious ignorance by stepping on a couple hundred random porches. See what it feels like to have a dim-witted owner tell you this, all the while holding his heathen beast back by the neck as it barks, growls, and salivates at the instinctual thought of eating you. I speak from experience; I carried mail in Paoli during my summer break from college last year, and needless to say, I'm looking for other employment this summer.
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