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NEWS
February 23, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA "Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds. " Except in parts of winter-weary Philadelphia, it appears. More than a week after the latest in this winter's parade of storms dumped a messy mix of snow and ice on the city, some Philadelphians say their mail hasn't arrived for days. "You come to depend on the mail, so it's very frustrating," said Ellen Frankel, 62, of East Mount Airy. Frankel, who lives in a condominium development, said she had not received her mail since Feb. 15. Ray Daiutolo Sr., a regional spokesman for the U.S. Postal Service, said he had heard scattered reports from Philadelphia and South Jersey residents who have been without mail for more than a week.
NEWS
December 11, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The defense in the $6.7 million fraud trial of charter school founder Dorothy June Brown rested Monday without calling Brown or her two codefendants to testify. But before Brown's attorneys ended their side of the case, they put on the stand a former Agora Cyber Charter School parent who is being sued for defamation by Brown. Gladys Stefany testified that she had not written a racist e-mail about Brown, even though she said in a 2010 deposition for the defamation case that she had. Stefany, who is diabetic, told federal jurors that she had been in the deposition for several hours and had not eaten.
NEWS
October 19, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some mail-in votes for New Jersey's Nov. 5 gubernatorial election may be voided if they were sent in the same envelope used to mail ballots for Wednesday's special Senate election, officials said Thursday. Assemblywoman Bonnie Watson Coleman, in a conference call with reporters Thursday morning, said campaign workers for State Sen. Barbara Buono, a fellow Democrat running for governor, had learned that "up to a few thousand" such mail-in votes could be voided. The Attorney General's Office issued a statement Thursday saying there was a concern in Mercer County regarding a "few" such ballots.
NEWS
October 19, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN More than 600 people who preregistered for a combined job fair and political rally hosted by Camden mayoral candidate Amir Khan received e-mails telling them they would get priority hiring if they volunteered for his campaign. The e-mail, provided to The Inquirer, told job applicants who filled out a preapplication form online that they would be "first in line for receiving a position" based on agreement to volunteer for the event Monday, and "for election work" on Wednesday and Nov. 5. The event was a ribbon-cutting for Acts Industries L.L.C., a maker of modular housing units, which says it will employ as many as 1,000 people in assembly-line work at $15 an hour, with the first 300 to 400 hired in the next three to four months, owners say. Khan, who knows Acts owner Irv Richter and helped arrange bringing the business to Camden, hosted the event, which drew thousands.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Ask Michael Holahan about his childhood in Overbrook, and mouthwatering recollections pour forth: Tastykakes. Lebanon bologna sandwiches. And lots of candy. "As a teenager, I worked at a neighborhood pharmacy called Love Pharmacy, and the pharmacist, Tom Brannon, turned me on to Wilbur Buds," Holahan said of the beloved chocolate drops. He confesses another indulgence: "I spent every cent of tip money on Zitner Butter Krak eggs for the two to three months they were available around Easter each year.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | By Andrew Miga, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Americans for generations have come to depend on door-to-door mail delivery. It's about as American as apple pie. But with the Postal Service facing billions of dollars in annual losses, the delivery service could be virtually phased out by 2022 under a proposal a House panel was considering Wednesday. Curbside delivery, which includes deliveries to mailboxes at the end of driveways, and cluster box delivery would replace letter carriers slipping mail into front-door boxes.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By Tom Lobianco, Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS - Purdue University President Mitch Daniels fended off calls for his ouster Wednesday and denied trying to quash academic freedom while serving as Indiana's governor, a day after an Associated Press report cited e-mails in which he opposed use of a book by historian and antiwar activist Howard Zinn. Conservative free-speech advocates rose to his defense, saying it was appropriate for Daniels to express concern about what was taught in public institutions. E-mails published Tuesday by the AP show that Daniels tried to ensure Zinn's book was not used in Indiana's K-12 and college classrooms and that he wanted to "disqualify the propaganda" he said was being taught to teachers in training at Indiana's colleges.
NEWS
June 23, 2013 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Do you remember when you wanted mail? I don't. If you do, you must be younger than I am, or have a better memory, which is basically the same thing. Bottom line, I'm not sure when this happened, but there came a time when mail started to suck. Correction. I know exactly when this happened. When I grew up and started paying my own bills. We can all agree that bills are no fun, but that's not even the problem I have with my mail. Because at least bills are important.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A Corbett cabinet member's undoing was an e-mail exchange with his wife about last month's falcon-banding event at the Capitol complex. Gov. Corbett on Thursday announced in a tersely worded news release that he had asked for Richard Allan's resignation as secretary of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. He did not identify a reason. The Inquirer reported that Allan, who is white, was fired for having used what could be perceived as racially charged language in an e-mail to describe a black employee in another department.
NEWS
June 15, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis and Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Gov. Corbett fired a member of his cabinet Thursday over an e-mail containing racially charged language referring to a state employee, according to multiple sources with knowledge of the matter. Corbett announced Thursday morning that he had asked Richard J. Allan, 60, secretary of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, to resign effective immediately. In the statement, the governor did not give a reason. Spokesman Kevin Harley also declined to discuss the firing, saying only that it was a "personnel decision.
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