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NEWS
March 24, 2011
NEW YORK - General Mills Inc.'s net income rose 18 percent in the fiscal third quarter, driven by the sale of more snacks and strength abroad. The maker of Nature Valley snack bars and Cheerios cereal has started to raise prices for some of its products over the past few months to cope with rising ingredient costs. It expects price increases will accelerate during the current fiscal fourth quarter. -Associated Press
BUSINESS
February 6, 1988 | By Ron Wolf, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennwalt Corp. reached an agreement in principle yesterday for sale of its Stokes division to Alcatel Vacuum Products Inc. of Higham, Mass., for an undisclosed price. Stokes makes industrial-vacuum equipment at a plant on Tabor Road in Northeast Philadelphia, which employs 346 people. The buyer is a subsidiary of a French firm, Alcatel CIT. Pennwalt declined to disclose annual sales of the Stokes unit or to estimate the effect of the transaction on its first-quarter earnings.
NEWS
August 9, 2010
York-based Graham Packaging Co. Inc. said today that one of its subsidiaries is buying Liquid Container, L.P. for $568 million. Graham, a maker of mold plastic containers for the food and household industry, says it intends to use debt to fund the acquisition, which is expected to close this year. Liquid Container, which is based in West Chicago, Ill., and has 14 plants in this country - including in Newark, Del. - making molded plastic containers, sells about 80 percent of its products to the food industry.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1996 | BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS Inquirer staff writer Donna Shaw contributed to this report
Snowblowers are in such demand that one maker, Toro Co., has issued a plea to dealers outside the snow-buried areas to ship excess inventories to the Northeast. Even the blower on display in Toro's Bloomington, Minn., headquarters lobby has come up missing, said Don St. Dennis, a Toro spokesman. You won't find any snowblowers around Toro. The company made 130,000 snowblowers for this season, and every one of them has been shipped to dealers, St. Dennis said. "It's been a very strong year for us," he added.
NEWS
December 5, 1986
The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board is the best money-maker the state has - a profit of over $300 million. How can anything like that be called "stupidest, least . . . efficient and most corruption-prone system for retailing liquor and wine"? You should find out more about that system. Jack Haigh Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 14, 2011
Scala, an Exton software developer, said today it appointed Tom Nix as chief executive officer, effective Nov. 1. Nix, now a company vice president, will succeed Gerard Bucas, who is retiring after nine years as CEO. Scala provides software for digital signs used on billboards, in doctors' offices and in advertising management.    -Paul Schweizer
NEWS
June 12, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
A Philadelphia-area eyewear maker has snagged home-run slugger Sammy Sosa's endorsement for shades for the next two years. The Chicago Cubs star, who is leading the National League with 21 homers, wears Native Eyewear sunglasses when he chases line drives in right field. He doesn't wear them while batting. Eric Grunfeld, spokesman for Huntingdon Valley-based Native, said Sosa wears the Athelon style, priced from $85 to $90. Sosa has been wearing the glasses since the beginning of the season, but the deal wasn't finalized until yesterday.
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | McCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS
Armstrong World Industries, of Lancaster, said it acquired a Montreal-based maker of specialty metal ceilings for an undisclosed price. Armstrong said it purchased Simplex Ceilings as part of its strategy to widen its global leadership and manufacturing presence in targeted markets. Simplex is a 40-employee firm with annual sales of $10 million, according to Armstrong. Adding Simplex "expands our technical capabilities, broadens our extensive specialty ceilings portfolio and improves our service and lead times for customers in North America," Armstrong's Mike Shirk said.
NEWS
April 5, 2011
Merck & Co. Inc., a Whitehouse Station, N.J., pharmaceutical giant with major operations in Montgomery County, said today that it had agreed to pay $430 million for Inspire Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Raleigh, N.C., which specializes in medicines for eye diseases. Boards of directors for both companies as well as Inspire's largest shareholder, Warburg Pincus Private Equity IX L.P., have approved the deal, which values Inspire at $5 a share, a 26 percent premium over Inspire's Monday close.
NEWS
July 28, 1989 | By Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Stanley R. Bongard, a tool and die maker, died Tuesday. He was 63 and lived in Langhorne. Born in Manayunk, Bongard was a graduate of Roxborough High School, a Navy veteran of World War II, and a volunteer fireman with the Nottingham Fire Company. He had made his living in the tool and die trade for the last 40 years. At the time of his death, he was a 20-year employee with the Milton-Roy Co. Bongard was an active member of Harry T. Klunn Post 9220, Veterans of Foreign Wars.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 22, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chemours Co., a chemical maker split off from DuPont Co. last month, said it will close its titanium dioxide plant at Edge Moor, Delaware. The closure will idle 200 workers and 130 contractors, as part of a general reduction in production of the compound, which is used in PVC pipe, appliance paint and other industrial materials. The company will "redeploy" staff or pay them severance, the Wilmington-based company said.
NEWS
August 4, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
After successful treks across Europe and its native Canada, a child-size hitchhiking robot had made its way via rides with friendly humans all the way from Boston to New York City to the streets of Philadelphia. Whereupon, its makers say, it was mugged and dismembered on Saturday. The Canada-based creators of "hitchBOT" said they received the dispiriting news when they received a photo Saturday night of the smashed-up robot. They believe someone took it apart early Saturday morning.
FOOD
July 24, 2015 | Emma Eisenberg, For The Inquirer
Philadelphia has seen a steady rise in its premium ice cream cred over the last few years, and this summer, the frozen stuff is even more tricked out, with soft-serve cones injected with dulce de leche, fresh-picked berry ice cream stuffed between slabs of sugar cookie, and La Colombe-infused mocha ice cream layered with hazelnut chocolate for an affogato cake. And these are just a few of the offerings being churned up by the best of Philadelphia's small-batch ice cream makers. What follows is a list of this summer's best.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
WYOMISSING, Pa. - The doors are locked at Valley Forge Flag Co. Employees must ring a newly installed doorbell and wait outside the dark tinted windows for someone to let them in. Inside, phones are ringing. The Berks County flag manufacturer, one of the nation's largest, has been fielding angry calls since making headlines Tuesday when it announced it would no longer make the Confederate battle flag. The decision came in the wake of the June 17 killing of nine black church members in Charleston, S.C., and growing public opposition to a flag seemingly embraced by alleged shooter Dylann Roof and others as a symbol of white supremacy and slavery.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can a beloved cheesecake baked in New York for six decades be just as skillfully prepared in . . . New Jersey? Junior's - New York City's third generation of famed Brooklyn cheesecake bakers - has moved its main baking operations to Burlington City. The company's new location at the foot of the Burlington-Bristol Bridge housed Mother's Kitchen, which produced cheesecakes for Rich's Products Corp. About a year ago, Mother's went south for a new facility in Texas. Junior's owner Alan Rosen needed a larger bakery than the one in Queens, which produced for all the Junior's restaurants and retail.
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Long wallowing in deterioration and neglect, Philadelphia's East Market neighborhood is on the verge of becoming a lively bridge between City Hall and Independence Mall. Though grateful for the corridor's upward momentum, the city should not be so desperate as to accept whatever is offered by developers who also stand to benefit from the transformation. Plans to refurbish the dowdy Gallery mall are vague so far, though the developers, Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust and California-based Macerich, promise a better flow of foot traffic between the street and shops, as well as more glass and other architectural flourishes.
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maker Brad Litwin, 59, makes kinetic sculptures in his East Oak Lane studio, including a line he calls MechaniCards - intricately laser-cut paper made into tiny, greeting-generating machines. They're sold online, at MechaniCards.com, and at museum stores, including those of the Princeton Art Museum and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His start Litwin can't really pinpoint it: He's worked as an engineer, animator, musician, and artist. "In 2010, I was sitting in my studio and looking at some boxes I had on the shelf, CD mailers actually . . .. I was thinking it'd be neat to have a machine inside one of those.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THROUGH the years, people have told James Stewart that someday someone was going to come along and help him. He thought about those words as he learned to ride a bike. He thought about them as he bonded with his father over cooking lessons. He thought about them as he toured pizzerias to learn how to toss pizzas. He thought about them as he lived his life with a malformed hand, a birth defect. The reality is that Stewart, 34, doesn't need help: He's adapted, he's determined and he's doing just fine in his job making pizzas.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Alexander Danta curled his frame around a cluttered wooden table in his Jewelers' Row workshop to inspect his latest handiwork, a diamond-and-ruby wedding band that nested in his meaty palm like a newborn chick. Raising the delicate ring to the window, he tipped it slightly to catch the light, revealing an acanthus vine he had just etched on the side, perhaps a centimeter wide and sharp as a line of type. Danta is a master engraver, among the last in Philadelphia to work exclusively with hand tools, and his studio was the custom-made ring's latest stop on its journey through the Jewelry Trades Building at Eighth and Sansom Streets, a six-story beehive filled with designers, casters, polishers, and stone-setters.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
WHEN THE Liberian Women's Chorus for Change performed for soldiers involved in that country's civil war, Philadelphia Folklore Project Director of Programs Toni Shapiro-Phim said that some in the audience were so moved that they handed their guns to the performers as a sign of peace. The artists from the same group performed in different communities with people of varied ethnic backgrounds as a model for reconciliation in the country, Shapiro-Phim said. Shapiro-Phim said these are perfect examples of what the PFP's event tomorrow, "Peacebuilding and Traditional Arts: A Forum," will discuss - how traditional arts and social-justice work can combine to create positive change in communities.
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