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Malaria

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NEWS
August 23, 1992 | By Vernon Loeb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a measure of the trouble here in what might otherwise be called paradise, Barnabus Bana has a wanted poster tacked up on the wall of his front porch for a dreaded family of miscreants. They go by the name of Anopheles, come out just after dark and put the bite on just about anyone. We're talking mosquitoes, of course. And if they get you, here in the Solomon Islands, the odds are you'll go down - and go down hard. What the place lacks in crime, it makes up for in malaria, which is why the wanted poster on Bana's front porch for anopheline mosquitoes says, "Wanted dead.
SPORTS
October 18, 2000 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Atlanta Hawks center Dikembe Mutombo has a mild case of malaria and will likely miss the beginning of the NBA's regular season. "It's not life-threatening, it's not career-threatening," Hawks general manager Pete Babcock said yesterday. "It sounds terrible, but it's really like a bad case of the flu. " Mutombo was hospitalized with a fever Monday in Springfield, Mass., where the Hawks played in the NBA Hall of Fame exhibition game against the Boston Celtics. Babcock said the team learned Mutombo had the disease at halftime of Monday's game.
NEWS
July 7, 2010
PolyMedix Inc., a small biotechnology company in Radnor, said today that it received a grant valued at $500,000 in the first year, and up to $4 million over five years, to develop compounds for the treatment of malaria. The grant from the National Institutes of Health supports development of compounds that are intended to reduce drug resistance, which has been a problem with treating the disease. Continuation of the grant depends on satisfactory performance and availability of funds, the company said in a written statement.
NEWS
October 4, 2008 | By Carolyn Davis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If only the mosquitoes in many poor countries were as timid as the ones buzzing shyly around the hall at Philadelphia's William B. Mann School. But because they aren't, because they bite with a fatal ferocity and regularity, the Nothing But Nets campaign spent the morning at the Wynnefield school yesterday, teaching children about mosquito-borne malaria and one strategy for preventing it. "When I found out [about malaria], I was sad and I thought I was going to cry," said 9-year-old Kaylah Fortson Rannels.
NEWS
March 5, 2009 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Montgomery County schoolgirl Aliza Glatter was honored last night in New York for placing second in an international campaign to help stop the spread of malaria. Glatter, 13, of Fort Washington, raised money to buy protective netting for 1,400 people in countries where malaria is transmitted by mosquito bites while people sleep. She beat out all but one of 261 competitors in the online contest based on basketball's March Madness. Only a team of adults from Boston did better, contest officials said.
NEWS
August 22, 1993 | From Inquirer wire services
Nobel laureate Mother Teresa was diagnosed yesterday as suffering from malaria, and doctors expected her to remain in intensive care. The Roman Catholic nun was admitted to the All India Institute of Medical Sciences after she came to New Delhi on Friday to receive the Rajiv Gandhi National Amity award. Mother Teresa, who will turn 83 Friday, was in stable condition with a mild fever and nausea, the hospital said. A blood test showed she was struck by malaria, an infectious tropical disease characterized by high fever, severe chills and enlargement of the spleen.
NEWS
March 28, 2001
Jaw-dropping astonishment was our first reaction to former state Democratic chairman Ed Mezvinsky's claim that the financial shenanigans leading to his indictment last week on 66 fraud counts had been caused by the anti-malaria medicine he had been taking. That was our second and third reactions, too. The claim is eerily similar to Dan White's. He was the San Francisco supervisor who, when tried for the murder of Mayor George Moscone and fellow Supervisor Harvey Milk, said his junk-food diet had so deranged him that he should be acquitted on the basis of temporary insanity.
NEWS
December 8, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
OH POTTED PALM If you're an environmentally conscious person faced with the annual quandary of whether to buy a recyclable wood or reusable plastic Christmas tree, here's another option. "There's no question that having a live Christmas tree is the greenest thing to do," says Joel Makower, publisher of the monthly Green Consumer Letter. But, he adds, a living indoor holiday tree need not resemble a towering forest pine. "A small potted plant will do. " But how to get all those presents underneath a cactus?
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | By Phillip Wilhite, Special to The Inquirer
In response to a recent malaria scare, the Camden County Mosquito Commission has set out traps to monitor the mosquito population. Four cases of malaria were confirmed in Gloucester Township and in Sicklerville last month, but no new cases have been reported since Sept. 19, officials said. The cases were the first confirmed in Camden County in 50 years, said Dr. Jung Cho of the county Health Department. Howard Emerson, superintendent of the Mosquito Commission, said traps to monitor the mosquito population had been set up in Albion, Blackwood and Cedarbrook.
NEWS
December 29, 2013 | By Dr. Bradley Johnson, For The Inquirer
A 65-year-old avid gardener worked hard every summer maintaining his wooded property in rural New Jersey. He would spend hours outdoors, trimming trees and bushes, mulching and landscaping, and invariably would be bitten by insects. He considered that a small price to pay for the great pleasure of communing with nature. He also had grown accustomed to aches and pains after a strenuous day in the yard. This year, however, he felt more uncomfortable than usual. After several weeks of treating himself with a buffet of over-the-counter pain remedies, he became concerned when he developed night sweats and increasing fatigue.
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NEWS
December 29, 2013 | By Dr. Bradley Johnson, For The Inquirer
A 65-year-old avid gardener worked hard every summer maintaining his wooded property in rural New Jersey. He would spend hours outdoors, trimming trees and bushes, mulching and landscaping, and invariably would be bitten by insects. He considered that a small price to pay for the great pleasure of communing with nature. He also had grown accustomed to aches and pains after a strenuous day in the yard. This year, however, he felt more uncomfortable than usual. After several weeks of treating himself with a buffet of over-the-counter pain remedies, he became concerned when he developed night sweats and increasing fatigue.
NEWS
October 19, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Malaria seemed closer to being thwarted as a world menace on Tuesday with the news of clinical trial results for a vaccine that would prevent the mosquito-borne disease from killing some of the nearly 800,000 African children it claims each year. "A vaccine is the simplest, most cost-effective way to save lives," said billionaire Bill Gates, cochairman of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which helped fund the research and the clinical trials conducted in seven African countries with 15,460 children.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Maria Cheng, Associated Press
LONDON - A global health fund believes millions of dollars' worth of its donated malaria drugs have been stolen in recent years, vastly exceeding the levels of theft previously suspected, according to confidential documents obtained by the Associated Press. The internal investigation by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria comes two months into an anticorruption program that the fund launched after an AP report detailing fraud in their grants attracted intense scrutiny from donors.
SPORTS
August 10, 2010 | By BOB COONEY, cooneyb@phillynews.com
This upcoming season could very well be a humbling one for 76ers guard Willie Green. Minutes will surely be limited for the veteran, entering his eighth season, because of the team's addition of No. 2 pick Evan Turner, as well as the acquisition of shooting swingman Andres Nocioni. But nothing will humble Green more than the trip he just completed as part of Basketball without Borders Africa, which took him to Dakar, Senegal, to help instruct the top 60 young basketball players from the continent, on and off the court.
NEWS
July 7, 2010
PolyMedix Inc., a small biotechnology company in Radnor, said today that it received a grant valued at $500,000 in the first year, and up to $4 million over five years, to develop compounds for the treatment of malaria. The grant from the National Institutes of Health supports development of compounds that are intended to reduce drug resistance, which has been a problem with treating the disease. Continuation of the grant depends on satisfactory performance and availability of funds, the company said in a written statement.
NEWS
March 5, 2009 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Montgomery County schoolgirl Aliza Glatter was honored last night in New York for placing second in an international campaign to help stop the spread of malaria. Glatter, 13, of Fort Washington, raised money to buy protective netting for 1,400 people in countries where malaria is transmitted by mosquito bites while people sleep. She beat out all but one of 261 competitors in the online contest based on basketball's March Madness. Only a team of adults from Boston did better, contest officials said.
NEWS
October 4, 2008 | By Carolyn Davis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If only the mosquitoes in many poor countries were as timid as the ones buzzing shyly around the hall at Philadelphia's William B. Mann School. But because they aren't, because they bite with a fatal ferocity and regularity, the Nothing But Nets campaign spent the morning at the Wynnefield school yesterday, teaching children about mosquito-borne malaria and one strategy for preventing it. "When I found out [about malaria], I was sad and I thought I was going to cry," said 9-year-old Kaylah Fortson Rannels.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2007 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline's malaria vaccine, designed to protect against one of the world's great killers, has passed another hurdle. A test in very young infants in rural Mozambique showed that the vaccine - RTS,S - was safe and reduced new malaria infections detected in the blood 65 percent after three months compared with a comparison group. The three-shot vaccine also reduced malaria outbreaks 35 percent after six months. The trial, the results of which were published yesterday in the British medical journal the Lancet and announced at a meeting in Seattle sponsored by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, represents the first test of a malaria vaccine in young infants, the group most vulnerable to the effects of the parasitic disease.
SPORTS
April 26, 2007 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kyle Korver of the 76ers got his off-season off to a productive start by joining first lady Laura Bush yesterday in Washington to help mark Malaria Awareness Day. Korver, with former NBA players Buck Williams and Gheorghe Muresan, participated in a basketball-shooting contest with children from the Public Charter School in Washington. The celebrities were at the school and then the White House to raise awareness for Nothing but Nets, a grassroots campaign to prevent malaria.
NEWS
January 5, 2007 | By Josh Ruxin
There's reason for hope for public-health success in sub-Saharan Africa, in part because the world - especially some influential Americans - are paying more attention. American financial and ideological interest is crucial, because the United States still drives the global public-health agenda. Here in Africa, where every public-health crisis - from AIDS to tuberculosis to malaria - has become manageable in the developed world, the challenge is not just financial but organizational: how to execute initiatives consistently, given the limited infrastructure, on a scale that is daunting.
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