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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Guimba, the Tyrant, a ruler holds absolute power over a small town in Mali and demonstrates yet again that such authority corrupts absolutely. But the masterly touch in Cheick Oumar Sissoko's film is that the tyrant is undone by his own lack of self-control. Guimba wields the power of life and death from a throne to which he rose by being more brutal than any other contender. It is his firm belief that mercy is a sign of weakness that enemies inside and outside his domain will exploit.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Rukmini Callimachi and Baba Ahmed, Associated Press
DIABALY, Mali - French troops in armored personnel carriers rolled through the streets of Diabaly on Monday, winning praise from residents of this besieged town after Malian forces retook control of it with French help a week after radical Islamists invaded. The Islamists also have deserted the town of Douentza, which they had held since September, according to a local official who said French and Malian forces arrived there on Monday as well. The militants' occupation of Diabaly marked their deepest encroachment into government-held territory, and Monday's retaking of the town is a significant victory for the French-led intervention.
NEWS
January 27, 2013 | By Krista Larson and Rukmini Callimachi, Associated Press
KONNA, Mali - French and Malian troops regained control of the airport and bridge of the crucial, northern city of Gao on Saturday, marking their biggest advance yet in their bid to oust al-Qaeda-linked extremists who have controlled northern Mali for months, military officials said. The move comes just two weeks after France launched its military offensive in support of the shaky central government of this former French colony. It is unclear what kind of resistance French and Malian troops will face in the coming days.
NEWS
January 30, 2013 | By Jerome Delay and Krista Larson, Associated Press
GAO, Mali - Residents in Mali's newly liberated city of Gao hunted down and beat suspected Islamist extremists who had not fled with their brothers-in-arms as Malian and French military forces closed in and retook the town. Malian troops bundled the men into an army truck Tuesday, their hands bound behind their backs. For the better part of a year, the al-Qaeda-linked extremists had banned music, insisted women cover themselves, and began carrying out public executions and amputations in the towns of northern Mali that they controlled.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Krista Larson and Lori Hinnant, Associated Press
SEVARE, Mali - Backed by French helicopters and paratroops, Malian soldiers entered the fabled city of Timbuktu on Monday after al-Qaeda-linked militants who ruled the outpost by fear for nearly 10 months fled into the desert, setting fire to a library that held thousands of manuscripts dating to the Middle Ages. French Col. Thierry Burkhard, chief military spokesman in Paris, said that there had been no combat with the Islamists but that the French and Malian forces did not yet control the town.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2012 | By Kevin L. Carter, For The Inquirer
While Sidi Touré, the musician from northern Mali, performed his culture's music at World Cafe Live on Tuesday, the area near Gao, his hometown, was under siege from Islamist insurgents. Here on tour, Touré didn't spend much time talking about the conflict back home, but his gentle brand of West African folk-blues served as a statement of hope and perseverance. With his ensemble (calabash percussion, a Malian guitar, and a traditional one-stringed violin), Touré almost exclusively played selections from his latest album, Koima . Touré, like fellow Malian bluesmen Ali Farka Touré and Vieux Farka Touré - Sidi shares nationality, a surname, and clan identification with that father-son combo but is not closely related - plays a string-heavy, hypnotic style of music (styles, to be exact)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Singer Mariam Doumbia may have been influenced by Ang?lique Kidjo, and guitarist/vocalist Amadou Bagayoko by the work of legendary Cuban guitarists such as Compay Segundo. But, ultimately, the harmonious music of Amadou and Mariam - the blind Malian duo made famous by the wide-screen African pop of 2005's Dimanche ? Bamako - finds its greatest inspiration in the wedded bliss of its principals. "From the music came love, and from love came a home, so being together means that we share views and complement each other every step of the way that we share," Bagayoko says (through an interpreter)
NEWS
February 2, 2013 | By Rukmini Callimachi, Associated Press
TIMBUKTU, Mali - Three suspected jihadists arrested in the days since the liberation of Timbuktu said Friday that Malian soldiers were torturing them with a method similar to waterboarding. The three were being held in an earthen cell in what remains of the military camp in the town, which was freed this week by French and Malian soldiers after nearly 10 months under radical Islamist rule. Their allegations came as French President Francois Hollande prepared to fly to Mali on Saturday, nearly four weeks after the French-led operation began in the vast West African country.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Sylvie Corbet, Associated Press
PARIS - French and Malian forces moving into far eastern Mali clashed with jihadist fighters in a spontaneous gun battle Wednesday, leaving a French soldier and about 10 insurgents dead, a French military spokesman said. The skirmish about 60 miles east of Gao, marked the latest bloodshed since French forces swooped into the West African nation in January to help its government root out extremist fighters. Mali's regional allies have sent hundreds of troops in a support role. Col. Thierry Burkhard, a French military spokesman, said the battle came as a military patrol involving troops from France, Mali, and Niger was extending into a previously uncontrolled territory.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Krista Larson, Associated Press
GAO, Mali - Black-robed Islamic extremists armed with AK-47 automatic rifles invaded Gao in wooden boats Sunday to launch a surprise attack on the most populous city in northern Mali, two weeks after French and Malian troops ousted the jihadists. Gunfire echoed for hours across the city of mud-walled buildings. The combat started about 2 p.m. in downtown Gao and the fighting was continuing as night fell. Later the sound of gunfire was replaced by the clattering of French military helicopters overhead.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Sylvie Corbet, Associated Press
PARIS - French and Malian forces moving into far eastern Mali clashed with jihadist fighters in a spontaneous gun battle Wednesday, leaving a French soldier and about 10 insurgents dead, a French military spokesman said. The skirmish about 60 miles east of Gao, marked the latest bloodshed since French forces swooped into the West African nation in January to help its government root out extremist fighters. Mali's regional allies have sent hundreds of troops in a support role. Col. Thierry Burkhard, a French military spokesman, said the battle came as a military patrol involving troops from France, Mali, and Niger was extending into a previously uncontrolled territory.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Angela Charlton, Associated Press
PARIS - France's defense minister said Tuesday that French troops were involved in "very violent fighting" in the mountains of northern Mali and that it was too early to talk about a quick pullout from the West African country, despite the growing cost of the intervention. The fighting against Islamic extremists in the Adrar des Ifoghas mountains has been going on for days. A clash in the area killed 23 soldiers from neighboring Chad on Friday, according to a letter from French President Francois Hollande expressing condolences to his Chadian counterpart.
NEWS
February 24, 2013 | By Craig Whitlock, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - President Obama announced Friday that about 100 U.S. troops have been deployed to the West African country of Niger, where defense officials said they are setting up a drone base to spy on al-Qaeda fighters in the Sahara. In a letter to Congress, Obama said about 40 U.S. military personnel arrived in Niger on Wednesday, bringing the total number of troops based there to "approximately" 100. He said the troops, who are armed for self-protection, would support a French-led military operation in neighboring Mali, where al-Qaeda fighters and other militants have carved out a refuge in a remote territory the size of Texas.
NEWS
February 23, 2013 | By Craig Whitlock, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - President Obama announced Friday that about 100 U.S. troops have been deployed to the West African country of Niger, where defense officials said they are setting up a drone base to spy on al-Qaeda fighters in the Sahara. In a letter to Congress, Obama said about 40 U.S. military personnel arrived in Niger on Wednesday, bringing the total number of troops based there to "approximately" 100. He said the troops, who are armed for self-protection, would support a French-led military operation in neighboring Mali, where al-Qaeda fighters and other militants have carved out a refuge in a remote territory the size of Texas.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Jamey Keaten, Associated Press
PARIS - It's crunch time in Mali for the French military. Radical Islamist fighters spent weeks on the run from Malian cities under a French ground and air assault - but they're brazenly fighting back this week at French troops. The French, meanwhile, are tightening a dragnet against the al-Qaeda-linked militants in one of their last remaining redoubts, mountain sanctuaries near Algeria's border. France's government said Wednesday it's still hoping to pull out of its thorny Mali operation in the coming weeks.
NEWS
February 12, 2013
U.N. envoy asks Iraqi tolerance BAGHDAD - Iraq's Shiite-led government should do more to address complaints by the country's disaffected Sunni minority about human-rights violations and lack of due process, the U.N. envoy to the country said in an interview Monday. Sunnis have staged mass rallies in recent weeks to protest what they see as unfair treatment of their sect by the government of Nouri al-Maliki, a Shiite accused by critics of monopolizing power. The protests, along with a recent spike in attacks by suspected Sunni insurgents, have revived fears that sectarianism could tear apart Iraq's fragile national fabric.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Krista Larson, Associated Press
GAO, Mali - Black-robed Islamic extremists armed with AK-47 automatic rifles invaded Gao in wooden boats Sunday to launch a surprise attack on the most populous city in northern Mali, two weeks after French and Malian troops ousted the jihadists. Gunfire echoed for hours across the city of mud-walled buildings. The combat started about 2 p.m. in downtown Gao and the fighting was continuing as night fell. Later the sound of gunfire was replaced by the clattering of French military helicopters overhead.
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By Jamey Keaten, Associated Press
PARIS - Mud, money, and more security: The U.N.'s cultural agency said Friday that not much more is needed to help rebuild 11 mausoleums that Islamic extremists "totally devastated" in the fabled Malian city of Timbuktu. UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova said she plans to send experts to Mali to assess the full extent of the damage left by al-Qaeda-linked Islamists who ran Timbuktu and the rest of northeastern Mali for months before being chased out by French-led troops. "We have to make an assessment about what the real situation is," said Bokova, who accompanied French President Francois Hollande to Timbuktu on Feb. 2. Of the mausoleums, "there are 11 that are totally devastated," she said.
NEWS
February 9, 2013 | By Krista Larson and Baba Ahmed, Associated Press
GAO, Mali - A young militant who locals say had ties to terrorist leader Moktar Belmoktar blew himself up Friday near a military checkpoint on the outskirts of Gao, fueling fears of a looming insurgency by jihadists who fled into the nearby desert just two weeks ago. The suicide attack, the first of its kind since the French-led mission began in January, highlights the challenges that remain despite the retaking of northern Mali's largest town by...
NEWS
February 6, 2013 | By Don Melvin, Associated Press
BRUSSELS, Belgium - International officials said Tuesday they are discussing the possibility of using a U.N. force to provide long-term security in Mali so that a political transition could take place. Any such decision would have to be approved by the U.N. Security Council. The current African-led support mission to Mali might be transformed into a U.N. force, said Kadre Desire Ouedraogo, president of the commission of the Economic Community of West African States, known as ECOWAS.
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