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Mammography

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NEWS
November 30, 2000 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
While more women seek annual mammograms on the advice of their doctors, breast imaging centers in parts of the country are scaling back or shutting down, saying they are losing money on the exams. The crunch between growing demand and the shrinking supply of locations where the tests can be performed is resulting in long delays for patients seeking appointments, a panel said yesterday at the Radiology Society of North America's annual meeting here. "Diagnosing breast cancer early is a national priority," said Robert A. Smith, director of cancer screening for the American Cancer Society in Atlanta.
NEWS
February 4, 2002 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the subject is mammography, researchers often sound like children squabbling in a school yard. "Early detection of breast cancer saves lives. " "No it doesn't. " "Does. " "Doesn't. " After 40 years of this, the dispute still isn't settled. That's why two Danish researchers reviewed the world's seven major studies of mammographic screening. They concluded two years ago in the Lancet that "screening for breast cancer with mammography is unjustified. " They reasserted that conclusion three months ago in a review in the same British medical journal.
NEWS
March 12, 2003 | By Dina Leacock
I went to the doctor recently for my annual humiliation, also know as The Exam. Why do they make you strip and then dress you in paper, which rips when you sit, offers absolutely no warmth, and crinkles every time you shift while waiting an eternity for the doctor? And why, oh, why do they air-condition the examining room even in winter? There I was, dressed in a paper gown, staring at the stirrups and dreading the whole forthcoming ordeal. I love it when, during The Exam, the doctor makes small talk and keeps repeating, "Relax.
LIVING
January 18, 1993 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years, doctors have been telling women under 50 to get regular mammograms. And for years, women such as Sharon Snyder have treated the message as seriously as life itself. Snyder, a Cherry Hill bank worker, got her first breast X-ray two years ago, when she was 39. She expects to have five more - one every other year - by the time she turns 50. To her, a normal mammogram means "relief - a good feeling that everything is OK and you're well. The studies have shown they can detect a pinhead, so you know there is nothing there.
NEWS
July 31, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / AMY HUNTOON
EXPLAINING THE BASICS of a mammography, Kathy McCabe (right) prepares Maudesia Veney, an employee of the Federal Reserve Bank, for her breast examination in the Healthcheck mobile mammography van. McCabe, a radiologic technician at the Fox Chase Cancer Center, assists with the exams in the van, which visited the bank Tuesday and yesterday to do the tests on the employees. The van is jointly owned by a health-maintenance organization and the cancer center.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most of Pennsylvania's mammography units have not been accredited, critics said yesterday, and women who depend on the exam to detect breast cancer have no guarantee that the equipment works. Because of that, Pennsylvania needs to establish statewide quality standards and accreditation for all its approximately 600 mammography machines, State Sen. Allyson Schwartz (D., Phila.) and several experts said. At a news conference at Chestnut Hill Hospital, Schwartz said she would introduce legislation today requiring that Pennsylvania's mammography machines and operators meet quality standards established by the American College of Radiology (ACR)
NEWS
October 25, 1991 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nation's breast cancer X-ray system is dangerously uncontrolled and must be regulated by the federal government, expert after expert testified yesterday at a Senate subcommittee hearing. But it was two women - one of them a Dallas professor with less than a year to live - who poignantly illustrated the real human cost of a botched mammogram test. The professor, Mary Stupp, 61, and Seattle resident Marie-Anne Domsalla, 31, testified that mammography tests had repeatedly given them clean bills of health even as advanced cases of cancer were spreading through their breasts.
NEWS
December 19, 2001 | By BARRON H. LERNER
DOUBTS ABOUT mammography are not new. Though many women and their doctors think of annual mammograms after age 40 as normal and necessary, there have long been vocal skeptics. Their dissident view about the usefulness of mammograms may seem to have been fully validated by the study published this fall in the Lancet concluding that women who have mammography die of breast cancer at the same rate as those who don't. But the issue of breast cancer screening isn't so easily settled.
NEWS
February 18, 2002 | By VIRGINIA L. ERNSTER
CONFLICTING judgments about the value of routine mammography have left women in a quandary. As a fiftysomething woman and an epidemiologist tracking the data, I believe that for now women 50 to 69 should stay the course and continue to have regular mammograms. But we ought not to dismiss concerns about flaws in the existing data, and women should know why experts are not speaking with a single voice. The evidence that mammography does work is weaker than we used to think. Also, everyone weighs benefits and risks differently.
NEWS
October 22, 1993 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An advisory board to the National Cancer Institute voted yesterday to drop federal guidelines recommending women under age 50 get routine mammograms to screen for breast cancer. The groundbreaking decision, opposed by many medical groups, reinforced a growing consensus among experts who say that the test does not save lives for women under 50. The recommendation of the cancer prevention and control advisory board, expected to be upheld in coming months by the entire NCI, is not binding on doctors and their patients.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A national study of nearly half a million women found that adding three-dimensional breast imaging to standard two-dimensional mammography increased cancer detection while reducing recalls for false alarms. The new X-ray technology, called tomosynthesis, was approved in 2011 and is still considered experimental by insurers, who do not cover it. Nonetheless, 3D is catching on. The study, published in Wednesday's Journal of the American Medical Association, involved 13 academic and community breast imaging centers, including two in Philadelphia - at Albert Einstein Healthcare Network and the University of Pennsylvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite ongoing debate over the value of screening mammography, use of breast X-rays has remained high over the last decade in Southeastern Pennsylvania. In 2010, 65.4 percent of women age 40 and older in the five-county region had a mammogram within the previous year. That proportion is slightly lower than the peak of 68.6 percent in 2000, but it is dramatically higher than in 1991, when little more than half of eligible women reported being screened, according to survey data from the Public Health Management Corp.
NEWS
February 12, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved the first three-dimensional system for breast-cancer screening, an advance expected to enhance detection while reducing false alarms and needless biopsies. The system, made by Hologic Inc. of Bedford, Mass., is approved in Europe and has been widely tested in the United States, including in Philadelphia at Albert Einstein Medical Center and the University of Pennsylvania. "The average radiologist is going to be better" at spotting breast cancer, predicted Andrew Maidment, a medical physicist at Penn.
NEWS
November 21, 2009
Bad advice on breast cancer The bean counters have decided that women under 50 don't need screening mammograms because only a small number will die ("New mammography advice: Less is more," Tuesday). They also decided that women over 74 needn't be screened. They cite the so-called harm of anxiety, added testing, and possible biopsies resulting from false positives. These are nothing compared with the consequences of failure to detect. In 1952, a young woman of my acquaintance died of breast cancer at the age of 33. Screening might have detected it early enough to save her life.
NEWS
April 5, 2007 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Computer software designed to improve radiologists' interpretation of mammograms actually reduces their accuracy, resulting in more retesting and biopsies that find no breast cancer, a major new study concludes. The surprising findings belatedly cast doubt on the value of "computer-aided detection," a nine-year-old technology that has been widely adopted and touted as the coming standard in breast-cancer screening. Joshua J. Fenton, lead author of the report in today's New England Journal of Medicine, said more than one-quarter of the nation's mammography facilities have invested up to $240,000 each to add computer-aided detection.
NEWS
October 20, 2004 | DEBBIE WOODELL
SOMEWHERE, after Melissa Etheridge's breast cancer became public knowledge, someone expressed surprise that lesbians could even get the disease. As if certain sexual activity protects people. But while Etheridge, 43, is definitely high-profile, she's hardly the only lesbian ever diagnosed with breast cancer. One in eight women in the U.S. will get breast cancer in their lifetime - more than 40,000 women will die annually. There are no firm statistics that lesbians are more or less affected, but because some have no need to see an "ob," they fail to understand they still need the "gyn.
NEWS
March 12, 2003 | By Dina Leacock
I went to the doctor recently for my annual humiliation, also know as The Exam. Why do they make you strip and then dress you in paper, which rips when you sit, offers absolutely no warmth, and crinkles every time you shift while waiting an eternity for the doctor? And why, oh, why do they air-condition the examining room even in winter? There I was, dressed in a paper gown, staring at the stirrups and dreading the whole forthcoming ordeal. I love it when, during The Exam, the doctor makes small talk and keeps repeating, "Relax.
NEWS
February 18, 2002 | By VIRGINIA L. ERNSTER
CONFLICTING judgments about the value of routine mammography have left women in a quandary. As a fiftysomething woman and an epidemiologist tracking the data, I believe that for now women 50 to 69 should stay the course and continue to have regular mammograms. But we ought not to dismiss concerns about flaws in the existing data, and women should know why experts are not speaking with a single voice. The evidence that mammography does work is weaker than we used to think. Also, everyone weighs benefits and risks differently.
NEWS
February 4, 2002 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the subject is mammography, researchers often sound like children squabbling in a school yard. "Early detection of breast cancer saves lives. " "No it doesn't. " "Does. " "Doesn't. " After 40 years of this, the dispute still isn't settled. That's why two Danish researchers reviewed the world's seven major studies of mammographic screening. They concluded two years ago in the Lancet that "screening for breast cancer with mammography is unjustified. " They reasserted that conclusion three months ago in a review in the same British medical journal.
NEWS
December 19, 2001 | By BARRON H. LERNER
DOUBTS ABOUT mammography are not new. Though many women and their doctors think of annual mammograms after age 40 as normal and necessary, there have long been vocal skeptics. Their dissident view about the usefulness of mammograms may seem to have been fully validated by the study published this fall in the Lancet concluding that women who have mammography die of breast cancer at the same rate as those who don't. But the issue of breast cancer screening isn't so easily settled.
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