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Man Ray

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1989 | By Maciej Pawlicki, Inquirer Staff Writer
The artist Man Ray once declared that his goal was "to accuse, bewilder, annoy or to inspire reflection. " He was mistaken by putting in or. There's nothing wrong with annoying and inspiring reflection, or provoking artistic shock and provoking brain activity. He succeeded at both. Man Ray's current exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art shows an artist who rebelled against art as a conventional form of expression. For him, art had very little to do with fitting into established patterns and very much to do with breaking them, turning them upside down, mocking them.
NEWS
November 29, 1988 | By ALICE-LEONE MOATS
In 1972, when I met Man Ray, the painter and photographer who revolutionized photography, he was 82 years old but still on the field, fighting his own battles for freedom. "Youth is psychological," he told me. "My body may show the effects of 82 years of hard living, but my mind's all right, and I'm not interested in the past. I have dozens of portfolios packed with sketches and ideas which I plan to develop in the future. " His vitality was such that, even after his death in 1976, his presence went right on being felt in the art world.
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | By ALICE-LEONE MOATS
The notes I took after my 1972 conversation with Man Ray show that he was a common sense philosopher as well as a painter and photographer. He was also 50 years ahead of his time, and while he insisted that there was a difference between the iron he transformed by gluing tacks on its face in order to make it useless, and Warhol's soup can, he nevertheless did see a connection. "This generation, like the Dadaists, wants to clear the field, destroy everything," he told me. "That's what the young advocate, but they don't really do it. It would be too much work.
NEWS
August 3, 2002 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Well before Andy Warhol and his Factory, New York had other artists and entourages. One in the 1940s was the photographer Man Ray, and among those who fancied herself in his circle was a model named Patricia deJohn. She also dabbled in art and antiques, collecting more than dealing. Among her acquisitions was a copy of one of Ray's more whimsical works, Mr. and Mrs. Woodman, a limited-edition album of 50 photographs of jointed wooden mannequins in various poses, some of them sexually explicit.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
It has been observed that the arrival of "Perpetual Motif: The Art of Man Ray" at the Philadelphia Museum of Art represents a double measure of poetic justice. The retrospective, which originated at the National Museum of American Art in Washington in December, is concluding in Man Ray's nominal home town and in a museum that holds an exceptional collection of work by his close friend and aesthetic soulmate, Marcel Duchamp. The Duchamp connection is particularly fitting, for no other American artist embraced the spirit of the satiric dada movement as wholeheartedly as Man Ray. If Duchamp was the father of dada, Man Ray was its first cousin.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
How felicitous that Man Ray (dada dad) and Andy Warhol (pop papa) enjoy concurrent local exhibitions, Ray at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Warhol at the Institute of Contemporary Art. Both artists had significant careers as avant-garde filmmakers and, happily, both shows have film sidebars. The Art Museum show includes four of Man Ray's vanguard films in the artist's retrospective. Warhol's early films are unavailable for distribution until next spring, so the ICA is hosting an evening of American underground films of the '50s, that were on the New York scene when Warhol arrived.
NEWS
January 8, 1998 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Picture this: photographs created without using a camera. The process of making these pictures, called photograms, has been around for at least 100 years, but to Harriet Ackerman's students at Lower Merion High School, creating the images was an awesome project. Yesterday, Ackerman invited Justyna Badach, a photography teacher at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, to be the guest instructor in her metal arts class. Ackerman, who teaches jewelry-making, said the photograms would be used as inspiration by the students for future jewelry projects.
NEWS
December 14, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Famous photographers often become identified with one or two signature images that encapsulate their careers for posterity. Berenice Abbott, who died Monday at 93 at her home in central Maine, will always be remembered for her singular portrait of James Joyce. Yet distilling her exceptional career down to that image - which endures as much for the fame of the sitter as for the skill of the photographer - blunts one's appreciation of her considerable accomplishments. Abbott, who learned her craft from Man Ray in Paris in the early 1920s, was the last of the modernist giants of the medium.
NEWS
September 3, 1989 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
This year's sesquicentennial of photography will be remembered for the astonishing prices paid for photographs at auctions. In three days, nearly $5 million was spent for photographs at three New York auction houses. Sotheby's sold $2,451,570 worth of pictures; Christie's, $1,938,200, and Swann, $486,000. The grand total for those sales in April was almost 60 percent better than last fall's cumulative total, which was a record $3,076,970. Sales this fall are expected to be strong, but may not top the spring performance.
NEWS
June 27, 1999 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Conventional portrait photography is condescended to by the art world. So in the three-artist, portrait-photography exhibit at Abington Art Center, don't expect to see anything remotely conventional. The approach in this show, titled Mortal Terrain, is much more indirect and subtle. Only one of the artists, David Freese, shows work you might recognize as portraiture at all. And go figure how the large painted images by Tracey Howard ever could have started out as photographs. This is another example of a display format favored by neighborhood art centers with increasing regularity - several mini-solo exhibits held to spotlight promising and diverse regional talent.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Brand Upon the Brain!, a feverishly imaginative Freudian vampire film from Guy Maddin, is like a silent-movie serial by Louis Feuillade or an improbable collaboration between writer Oscar Wilde and photographer Man Ray. It is not a film for the popcorn crowd. My hunch is that aesthetes, art students and lovers of experimental film will delight in Maddin's neo-Gothic, a film made by using primitive means, which makes a primal connection with its audience. In Toronto, Chicago and New York, Maddin's silent film was accompanied by a live orchestra, a celebrity narrator and a team of Foley (sound)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2005 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
The Parisian photographs of Eugene Atget (You-JEN At-JAY) are eerie records of another time, made by an enigmatic artist who never considered that his work would ever be exhibited. A major show at the Philadelphia Museum of Art through Nov. 27, "Looking at Atget," displays 144 images from the 361 in their collection. It boldly provides glimpses of the Paris of nearly a century ago, as well as the creative personality of a man who saw the city around him with imagination and enormous visual insight.
NEWS
August 3, 2002 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Well before Andy Warhol and his Factory, New York had other artists and entourages. One in the 1940s was the photographer Man Ray, and among those who fancied herself in his circle was a model named Patricia deJohn. She also dabbled in art and antiques, collecting more than dealing. Among her acquisitions was a copy of one of Ray's more whimsical works, Mr. and Mrs. Woodman, a limited-edition album of 50 photographs of jointed wooden mannequins in various poses, some of them sexually explicit.
NEWS
April 4, 2002 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Henry Ford had a worse idea. And if you've been following the news lately - tapes of Billy Graham telling Richard Nixon about the Jewish "stranglehold" on America, synagogues aflame in France and Belgium - it's as alive as the internal combustion engine. "As long as there have been and are and will be Jews, there will be anti-Semitism," remarks Neil Baldwin, author of the suddenly timely Henry Ford and the Jews (Public Affairs), about the auto magnate's decades of promoting anti-Jewish material around the world.
NEWS
February 4, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Anyone interested in photography will find plenty to see at the Delaware Art Museum. On the heels of the sold-out opening reception for "Linda McCartney's Sixties - A Portrait of an Era" is an exhibit on the history of photography that opens Friday. "An American Century of Photography: From Dry-plate to Digital: The Hallmark Photographic Collection," chronicles the history of photography in the United States from the mid-1800s to the present. The exhibit, which includes more than 100 vintage photographs, many quite rare, was organized by Keith F. Davis, a fine-arts program director at Hallmark Cards Inc. He selected them from the company's collection, considered to be one of the major holdings of its kind in the world.
NEWS
June 27, 1999 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Conventional portrait photography is condescended to by the art world. So in the three-artist, portrait-photography exhibit at Abington Art Center, don't expect to see anything remotely conventional. The approach in this show, titled Mortal Terrain, is much more indirect and subtle. Only one of the artists, David Freese, shows work you might recognize as portraiture at all. And go figure how the large painted images by Tracey Howard ever could have started out as photographs. This is another example of a display format favored by neighborhood art centers with increasing regularity - several mini-solo exhibits held to spotlight promising and diverse regional talent.
NEWS
January 8, 1998 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Picture this: photographs created without using a camera. The process of making these pictures, called photograms, has been around for at least 100 years, but to Harriet Ackerman's students at Lower Merion High School, creating the images was an awesome project. Yesterday, Ackerman invited Justyna Badach, a photography teacher at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, to be the guest instructor in her metal arts class. Ackerman, who teaches jewelry-making, said the photograms would be used as inspiration by the students for future jewelry projects.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Winter whale-watchers don't necessarily have to go to the Caribbean or Mexico's Sea of Cortez to see the big mammals. Some juvenile humpback whales have taken to leaving the southward migration and wintering near the relatively mild and food-rich mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, according to the Virginia Marine Science Museum. The museum began whale-watching trips off the coast of Virginia Beach, Va., last week and plans to continue them five days a week through March 30, or until the whales migrate from the area.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1994 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
"Artists of Manayunk and East Falls" is the second exhibition in a series conceived by Anne R. Fabbri to celebrate the city's various communities of artists. Fabbri, director of the Paley Design Center at Philadelphia College of Textiles & Science, began last year with Germantown and Mount Airy. Those sections of the city have traditionally attracted artists, whereas Manayunk and East Falls have done so more recently. The new exhibition of work by 27 artists is every bit as good as the inaugural.
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