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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2011 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
In the February chill of 1975, a 15-year-old boy left his home in the Mexican state of Guanajuato, slipped illegally across the border at Yuma, Ariz., and boarded a plane for Philadelphia. Along with two older friends who joined him, Isidro Rodriguez was headed for snowbound Kennett Square. The promise of big money from working the mushroom farms there was the talk of their little city, Moroleón. "But it was a lie - and I didn't like it," recalls Rodriguez, who found hundreds of migrant workers from his town already toiling there in the dark, smelly, windowless cinder-block buildings for $1.85 an hour.
NEWS
January 14, 2012
Russell J. Roth Sr., 83, of Sellersville, who retired as an electronics manager in 1992, died Tuesday, Jan. 10, of pulmonary fibrosis at Grand View Hospital. Born in Rochester, N.Y., Mr. Roth graduated from high school there. He served in the Navy from September 1945 to April 1949 and again from 1950 to 1952. His daughter, Cynthia Mannes, said he served in shipboard fire-control units in the Mediterranean, then was recalled to duty during the Korean War. Mr. Roth earned his bachelor's degree at Rutgers University after night classes in the late 1960s, while he was a quality-control manager for Philco-Ford in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
February 11, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
It was a dark day for Pete Mackanin. The Phillies had just finished a disappointing season with a .500 record, ending a run of five straight National League East titles. The misguided initial blame for the fantastic fall was placed on hitting coach Greg Gross, first base coach Sam Perlozzo and Mackanin, who was Charlie Manuel's bench coach that season. All three were immediately fired after the final game of the 2012 season in Washington. "It was disappointing, but I had been fired before for what I felt like was no good reason," Mackanin said last month during a Phillies winter banquet stop in Lakewood, N.J. Stick around baseball for 48 years and you are bound to be fired a time or two for no good reason.
SPORTS
June 27, 2011 | Associated Press
CHICAGO - Davey Johnson was named manager of the Washington Nationals on Sunday, three days after Jim Riggleman stunned the team by resigning. Johnson will manage the rest of the season and his first game will be Monday against the Los Angeles Angels. He has been a senior adviser with the team since 2009, though he hasn't managed in the big leagues since 2000 with the Los Angeles Dodgers. Johnson also agreed to a three-year consulting contract through 2013 that will allow him to remain with the team and help select a successor for next season.
NEWS
October 4, 2011
By Paul Jablow It would be a nightmare Rotisserie league lineup: Tony La Russa and Ron Washington as the double-play combination, Terry Francona at first, Joe Girardi behind the plate, and Charlie Manuel, with his .198 big-league batting average, alongside Ron Roenicke in the outfield. These guys - all marginal major-league players at best - were heading six of the 10 teams in contention for the playoffs in the final days of the baseball season. Three other top teams were led by managers who never made the majors.
NEWS
October 15, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
W. Raymond Hellings, 87, of Cinnaminson, a former aircraft quality control manager, died of complications from heart problems Friday, Oct. 9, at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. Mr. Hellings retired at age 65 after a career of more than a decade at the Boeing Co. plant in Ridley Township, his daughter, Beth Albasi, said. He was an unsuccessful Republican candidate for the Cinnaminson Township school board in the 1980s. He moved to the township in 1978, she said. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Hellings grew up in the Tacony section, graduated in 1946 from Northeast High School, and studied electrical engineering in night classes at Temple University.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
Chris Stamp, 70, who as a cockney kid from East London aspired to make a documentary film about the rise of British rock in the 1960s and ended up helping discover and manage a raucous working-class quartet called The Who, died Nov. 24 in Manhattan. The cause was complications of colorectal cancer, his wife, Calixte, said. "I was knocked out," Mr. Stamp recalled in 1966 of the night he first saw The Who perform in 1964. "But the excitement I felt wasn't coming from the group. I couldn't get near enough.
SPORTS
January 7, 2013 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - There are more than a few Alabama folks who will tell you that junior AJ McCarron could be the best quarterback the Crimson Tide has had since, dare we say, Joe Namath. With apologies to Richard Todd (or was that Jay Barker?), that was nearly half a century ago. Yet when most people think about the defending national champions, the passing game probably isn't the first thing that comes to mind. Maybe it's defense, even if this one isn't Nick Saban's strongest.
SPORTS
July 1, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
UPDATE: The Phillies on Tuesday afternoon named Mackanin interim manager for the rest of the season. The Phillies travel to Atlanta on Thursday night to open a three-game series. They know what downtown hotel they are staying in. They know what flight they will board. And they know who will pitch. But the Phillies are not fully certain who their manager will be against the Braves. President Pat Gillick said Monday that interim manager Pete Mackanin will manage the remainder of this week's four-game series against Milwaukee.
SPORTS
November 22, 2012
John Gibbons was hired as manager of the Toronto Blue Jays for the second time Tuesday, returning to a team that just invigorated its roster after a blockbuster trade with the Miami Marlins. "I never would have guessed this could happen," he said at a news conference. Gibbons managed Toronto from 2004 to 2008 and had a 305-305 record, making him the third-winningest manager in franchise history. He succeeds John Farrell, who spurned Toronto for his dream managing job in Boston.
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NEWS
September 18, 2016
Points to consider when shopping for an app to help manage diabetes care 1. Are you looking for a wellness app or a medical app? Wellness apps allow you to log in material, such as food consumption, exercise minutes, and blood glucose readings, while medical apps recommend how much insulin to take, when to take medications, etc. Medical apps are supposed to have undergone clinical and human factor trials and received FDA clearance. 2. What do you want from your app? Do you want to lose weight, increase exercise, receive support?
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Harold C. Juram, 98, an assistant general manager for SEPTA who "rode the transit system wherever he was headed" whenever possible, died Sunday, Sept. 4, at Abington Memorial Hospital of complications after a fall, his family said. He had lived in Southampton, Bucks County, before retiring to Foulkeways at Gwynedd in 1997. Mr. Juram began his career in the scheduling department of the old Philadelphia Transportation Co. (PTC), a private business that ran the trolleys, buses, trackless trolleys, subway, and elevated rail lines in the city from 1940 to 1968.
NEWS
September 14, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Jonathan A. Minder, 74, of Southampton, a former computer systems manager, died of respiratory failure on Sept. 7, at Virtua Voorhees Hospital. Until earlier this year, he had been a member since 2009 of the board of trustees at the Southampton retirement community Leisuretowne and president of that board since 2014. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Minder graduated from Gloucester Catholic High School in 1959. From 1961 to 1981, he was an Air Force radar and computer worker. He was discharged as a master sergeant.
NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, MUSIC CRITIC
Musicians of the Philadelphia Orchestra are negotiating to regain their place as among the highest-paid members of U.S. orchestras, while management has offered minimal raises in talks over a new contract. Players called the initial five-year offer, particularly in light of proposed work-rule changes, "regressive" and one that "demands concessions from the musicians," such as working more Sunday concerts. Management characterized its first offer as coming "very early in the process," said Ryan Fleur, executive vice president for orchestra advancement, saying such proposals "tend to overexaggerate.
NEWS
September 3, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
William V. Myers, 86, of North Cape May, a former AT&T staff manager who was an active member of his church congregation, died of Parkinson's disease on Tuesday, Aug. 30, at his home. At St. John Neumann parish in North Cape May, Mr. Myers served Communion at Sunday Masses and worked as an altar server at weekday funerals there. He had organized a group of six men who took turns each day of the week, as altar boys and girls do at Sunday Masses, his wife, Eleanor, said. Mr. Myers helped organize the parish's Holy Name Society, she said, and from 2005 to 2010 he was a member of the parish's financial committee.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Because hiring manager Jim McKeown was talking to an audience, he wasn't sitting at a desk, his head in hands, but he may as well have been. "I don't know where we are heading with manufacturing," he said, clearly discouraged. "The last 10 years have been difficult. " McKeown wasn't talking about sales, or business, or the supply chain, or the cost of raw materials - all important to such companies as Kingsbury Inc., which manufactures bearings in Philadelphia and Hatboro. For him, and about 30 area manufacturers attending Tuesday's meeting of the Manufacturing Alliance of Bucks and Montgomery Counties, the issue is manpower.
NEWS
September 1, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Kee Hyung Lee, 84, a former business manager for petroleum firms in Philadelphia, died of cancer Sunday, Aug. 21, at the assisted living community CareOne at Moorestown. Born in Seoul, South Korea, Mr. Lee joined his nation's army in 1950, as the Korean conflict began, and earned the rank of major. For a year in the 1950s, he studied at what is now Anderson University, a private Indiana college affiliated with the Church of God. He returned to South Korea and earned his bachelor's at Seoul National University.
NEWS
August 27, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Almost seven years after James Koons died from a punch to the head, a Philadelphia judge sentenced the manager of the Southwest Philadelphia strip club who threw that punch to 7-and-a-half  to 15 years in prison. Thursday's sentencing of John Pettit, 55, of Pennsauken, followed a mournful two-hour hearing, during which Koons' family unleashed emotion bottled up from nearly a decade of waiting. "I watched my son there, lifeless, with tubes drilled into his skull," said Koons' mother, Kathy Brady, staring at Pettit, seated across the courtroom looking down at the tabletop.
NEWS
August 19, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
A South Jersey psychiatrist with a practice in Philadelphia and his office manager were indicted Wednesday on charges of illegally selling more than $1 million in prescription drugs for cash, federal prosecutors said. Clarence R. Verdell, 66, of Voorhees, and Rochelle Williams-Morrow, 37, of Philadelphia, were charged with selling prescriptions of Klonopin and Suboxone without medical or mental-health examinations. Verdell worked for about six months for Dr. Alan Summers, who also recently was charged with illegally selling prescriptions, before opening his own clinic on Frankford Avenue in Frankford.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2016 | By Erin Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Hill International abruptly postponed its annual meeting Thursday, heightening the drama in a proxy battle at the Philadelphia-based public company. "We delayed the meeting for a significant business reason. That reason is confidential," said the new board chairman, David L. Richter. He said he expected a new date for the annual meeting to be set "perhaps in the next few weeks. " Shareholder votes were supposed to be counted at the morning meeting, but when investors showed up, no one from the company was there, according to one dissident shareholder.
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