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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2011 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
In the February chill of 1975, a 15-year-old boy left his home in the Mexican state of Guanajuato, slipped illegally across the border at Yuma, Ariz., and boarded a plane for Philadelphia. Along with two older friends who joined him, Isidro Rodriguez was headed for snowbound Kennett Square. The promise of big money from working the mushroom farms there was the talk of their little city, Moroleón. "But it was a lie - and I didn't like it," recalls Rodriguez, who found hundreds of migrant workers from his town already toiling there in the dark, smelly, windowless cinder-block buildings for $1.85 an hour.
SPORTS
February 11, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
It was a dark day for Pete Mackanin. The Phillies had just finished a disappointing season with a .500 record, ending a run of five straight National League East titles. The misguided initial blame for the fantastic fall was placed on hitting coach Greg Gross, first base coach Sam Perlozzo and Mackanin, who was Charlie Manuel's bench coach that season. All three were immediately fired after the final game of the 2012 season in Washington. "It was disappointing, but I had been fired before for what I felt like was no good reason," Mackanin said last month during a Phillies winter banquet stop in Lakewood, N.J. Stick around baseball for 48 years and you are bound to be fired a time or two for no good reason.
NEWS
January 14, 2012
Russell J. Roth Sr., 83, of Sellersville, who retired as an electronics manager in 1992, died Tuesday, Jan. 10, of pulmonary fibrosis at Grand View Hospital. Born in Rochester, N.Y., Mr. Roth graduated from high school there. He served in the Navy from September 1945 to April 1949 and again from 1950 to 1952. His daughter, Cynthia Mannes, said he served in shipboard fire-control units in the Mediterranean, then was recalled to duty during the Korean War. Mr. Roth earned his bachelor's degree at Rutgers University after night classes in the late 1960s, while he was a quality-control manager for Philco-Ford in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
June 27, 2011 | Associated Press
CHICAGO - Davey Johnson was named manager of the Washington Nationals on Sunday, three days after Jim Riggleman stunned the team by resigning. Johnson will manage the rest of the season and his first game will be Monday against the Los Angeles Angels. He has been a senior adviser with the team since 2009, though he hasn't managed in the big leagues since 2000 with the Los Angeles Dodgers. Johnson also agreed to a three-year consulting contract through 2013 that will allow him to remain with the team and help select a successor for next season.
NEWS
October 4, 2011
By Paul Jablow It would be a nightmare Rotisserie league lineup: Tony La Russa and Ron Washington as the double-play combination, Terry Francona at first, Joe Girardi behind the plate, and Charlie Manuel, with his .198 big-league batting average, alongside Ron Roenicke in the outfield. These guys - all marginal major-league players at best - were heading six of the 10 teams in contention for the playoffs in the final days of the baseball season. Three other top teams were led by managers who never made the majors.
NEWS
October 15, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
W. Raymond Hellings, 87, of Cinnaminson, a former aircraft quality control manager, died of complications from heart problems Friday, Oct. 9, at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. Mr. Hellings retired at age 65 after a career of more than a decade at the Boeing Co. plant in Ridley Township, his daughter, Beth Albasi, said. He was an unsuccessful Republican candidate for the Cinnaminson Township school board in the 1980s. He moved to the township in 1978, she said. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Hellings grew up in the Tacony section, graduated in 1946 from Northeast High School, and studied electrical engineering in night classes at Temple University.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
Chris Stamp, 70, who as a cockney kid from East London aspired to make a documentary film about the rise of British rock in the 1960s and ended up helping discover and manage a raucous working-class quartet called The Who, died Nov. 24 in Manhattan. The cause was complications of colorectal cancer, his wife, Calixte, said. "I was knocked out," Mr. Stamp recalled in 1966 of the night he first saw The Who perform in 1964. "But the excitement I felt wasn't coming from the group. I couldn't get near enough.
SPORTS
January 7, 2013 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - There are more than a few Alabama folks who will tell you that junior AJ McCarron could be the best quarterback the Crimson Tide has had since, dare we say, Joe Namath. With apologies to Richard Todd (or was that Jay Barker?), that was nearly half a century ago. Yet when most people think about the defending national champions, the passing game probably isn't the first thing that comes to mind. Maybe it's defense, even if this one isn't Nick Saban's strongest.
SPORTS
July 1, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
UPDATE: The Phillies on Tuesday afternoon named Mackanin interim manager for the rest of the season. The Phillies travel to Atlanta on Thursday night to open a three-game series. They know what downtown hotel they are staying in. They know what flight they will board. And they know who will pitch. But the Phillies are not fully certain who their manager will be against the Braves. President Pat Gillick said Monday that interim manager Pete Mackanin will manage the remainder of this week's four-game series against Milwaukee.
SPORTS
November 22, 2012
John Gibbons was hired as manager of the Toronto Blue Jays for the second time Tuesday, returning to a team that just invigorated its roster after a blockbuster trade with the Miami Marlins. "I never would have guessed this could happen," he said at a news conference. Gibbons managed Toronto from 2004 to 2008 and had a 305-305 record, making him the third-winningest manager in franchise history. He succeeds John Farrell, who spurned Toronto for his dream managing job in Boston.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
May 20, 2016 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
THERE WAS one out and the bases were loaded in the bottom of the ninth Sunday afternoon when Odubel Herrera came to the plate, the Phillies still trailing by five runs. David Lough had just worked a walk on a 3-2 pitch, a great veteran at-bat, forcing a pitching change and breathing more hope amid a Citizens Bank crowd of 27,869, many looking for yet another reason for another return to the cathedral they once attended regularly. Herrera, whose improved plate discipline has been one of the many surprising success stories of Pete Mackanin's brief managerial reign, stepped into the batter's box, took a ball, and then hacked at a pitch well beyond the strike zone, grounding feebly back to the pitcher.
NEWS
May 20, 2016
By Douglas A. Brook In March, President Obama signed the Presidential Transitions Improvement Act, which requires the outgoing president to put together a transition apparatus six months before Election Day. Presumptive GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump has named New Jersey's Gov. Christie to head his transition preparations. Hillary Clinton will soon follow with hers. The candidates are preparing for the postconvention period, when the government will provide them with office space and equipment, information technology, and staff assistance.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
It adds up: Pennsylvania paid more than $600 million in fees to hundreds of private firms managing money for its state and school pension systems in 2015. Plus more in submanager fees, and profits that hedge funds and real estate managers pocket at liquidation of their investments, which the pension systems don't count. The fees that the state pension systems reported total more than the investment profits the funds collected last year, a tough one for investors. Maybe it's not surprising, then, that professional money managers so often split these fees with the guides who promise to help them land government investment contracts.
NEWS
May 14, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
After turning his heating and cooling business over to his two sons in 1993, Theodore J. Speer Sr. became a docent on the Battleship New Jersey in Camden. And relying on cabinetmaking classes that he had taken in high school, he built a welcoming podium at the spot where visitors first set foot on the ship. Mr. Speer was "very much into the Navy," said Joe Holland, a friend of 40 years and a former neighbor who, like Mr. Speer, a fellow Navy veteran, had never served on the battleship.
NEWS
May 14, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari and Chris Brennan, STAFF WRITERS
Katie McGinty, who last month won a tough race to become the Democratic nominee for a U.S. Senate seat from Pennsylvania, has changed her campaign manager. McGinty this week brought on Jordan Marks, a longtime political hand who has ties to former Gov. Ed Rendell, McGinty's campaign chairman. Marks worked in Rendell's gubernatorial administration and on his 2006 reelection campaign, was on Hillary Clinton's 2008 team in Pennsylvania, and worked for national Democrats' congressional campaign operation.
NEWS
May 13, 2016
DEAR ABBY:  I am the building manager of a high-rise office building. Every year, we perform a fire alarm test to determine whether all our fire alarm systems work properly. Employees in the building must evacuate in a timely manner. Two years ago, a very overweight woman told me she had a heart condition and could not make it down the stairs during the drill. I told her to proceed to the stairwell, have one of her coworkers give me her location, and in the event of a fire, I'd send a firefighter up to get her. A year later, another obese woman told me that she, too, couldn't make it down the stairs.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Martha Woodall and Mensah M. Dean, STAFF WRITERS
The Philadelphia School District has failed to conduct background checks of all of its police officers and bus drivers, uses unreliable student-data technology, and is the victim of a "broken" state funding system, according to a performance audit released Wednesday by state Auditor General Eugene DePasquale. In addition to those key findings, DePasquale pointed out two other faults: He called the district's accounting system for unused textbooks after dozens of school closings in 2013 "inexcusable," and pointed out that the School Reform Commission had not conducted timely performance evaluations of Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. "Financially, the whole system for funding the Philadelphia School District is broken," DePasquale said at a news conference attended by Hite at School District headquarters.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Santigold Mount Airy's own Santi White, touring in support of 99¢, her new avant-pop album about music and commerce. Sunday at the Theater of Living Arts. "Under the Cherry Moon. " Test the limits of your Prince devotion with the screening of this 1986 black-and-white period piece that was the filmic follow-up to Purple Rain and that gave the world "Kiss" and "Sometimes It Snows in April. " Monday at the Balcony at the Trocadero. "The Night Manager.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Southeastern Pennsylvania will have two new companies offering managed Medicaid benefits in 2017, the Pennsylvania Department of Human Services said Wednesday. Entering the market are publicly-traded Centene Corp., of St. Louis, and UPMC For You, part of the giant University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, which dominates the managed Medicaid market in western Pennsylvania. Not selected to continue with the program in the Philadelphia region was Aetna Better Health, which had 73,852 members in March, or 9 percent of the market, according to state data.
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