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SPORTS
October 15, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
THE UNION pulled an astounding choke on Saturday night. In a span of 5 minutes, it blew a 2-0 lead late against the Columbus Crew to lose, 3-2, and got eliminated from the Major League Soccer playoff race. You decide which of the following statements sounds closer to the truth: In June, when he fired manager John Hackworth and replaced him with current interim manager Jim Curtin, Union CEO Nick Sakiewicz said: "I think we have a lot of quality in our team. We're a good team; we have quality in the locker room.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2011 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
In the February chill of 1975, a 15-year-old boy left his home in the Mexican state of Guanajuato, slipped illegally across the border at Yuma, Ariz., and boarded a plane for Philadelphia. Along with two older friends who joined him, Isidro Rodriguez was headed for snowbound Kennett Square. The promise of big money from working the mushroom farms there was the talk of their little city, Moroleón. "But it was a lie - and I didn't like it," recalls Rodriguez, who found hundreds of migrant workers from his town already toiling there in the dark, smelly, windowless cinder-block buildings for $1.85 an hour.
NEWS
January 14, 2012
Russell J. Roth Sr., 83, of Sellersville, who retired as an electronics manager in 1992, died Tuesday, Jan. 10, of pulmonary fibrosis at Grand View Hospital. Born in Rochester, N.Y., Mr. Roth graduated from high school there. He served in the Navy from September 1945 to April 1949 and again from 1950 to 1952. His daughter, Cynthia Mannes, said he served in shipboard fire-control units in the Mediterranean, then was recalled to duty during the Korean War. Mr. Roth earned his bachelor's degree at Rutgers University after night classes in the late 1960s, while he was a quality-control manager for Philco-Ford in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
June 27, 2011 | Associated Press
CHICAGO - Davey Johnson was named manager of the Washington Nationals on Sunday, three days after Jim Riggleman stunned the team by resigning. Johnson will manage the rest of the season and his first game will be Monday against the Los Angeles Angels. He has been a senior adviser with the team since 2009, though he hasn't managed in the big leagues since 2000 with the Los Angeles Dodgers. Johnson also agreed to a three-year consulting contract through 2013 that will allow him to remain with the team and help select a successor for next season.
NEWS
October 4, 2011
By Paul Jablow It would be a nightmare Rotisserie league lineup: Tony La Russa and Ron Washington as the double-play combination, Terry Francona at first, Joe Girardi behind the plate, and Charlie Manuel, with his .198 big-league batting average, alongside Ron Roenicke in the outfield. These guys - all marginal major-league players at best - were heading six of the 10 teams in contention for the playoffs in the final days of the baseball season. Three other top teams were led by managers who never made the majors.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
Chris Stamp, 70, who as a cockney kid from East London aspired to make a documentary film about the rise of British rock in the 1960s and ended up helping discover and manage a raucous working-class quartet called The Who, died Nov. 24 in Manhattan. The cause was complications of colorectal cancer, his wife, Calixte, said. "I was knocked out," Mr. Stamp recalled in 1966 of the night he first saw The Who perform in 1964. "But the excitement I felt wasn't coming from the group. I couldn't get near enough.
SPORTS
January 7, 2013 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - There are more than a few Alabama folks who will tell you that junior AJ McCarron could be the best quarterback the Crimson Tide has had since, dare we say, Joe Namath. With apologies to Richard Todd (or was that Jay Barker?), that was nearly half a century ago. Yet when most people think about the defending national champions, the passing game probably isn't the first thing that comes to mind. Maybe it's defense, even if this one isn't Nick Saban's strongest.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
After more than six hours of debate, the Lower Merion Township commissioners voted late Wednesday to approve a $275,000 pay package for township manager Douglas Cleland. A minority of Republicans led by commissioner Jenny Brown tried without success to amend the two-year pact, which would have caused it to be tabled under Roberts Rules of Order. The vote was 8 to 5, with one member of the 14-member panel absent. The yes votes all came from Democrats; the no votes came from three Republicans and two Democrats who broke with party lines.
SPORTS
November 22, 2012
John Gibbons was hired as manager of the Toronto Blue Jays for the second time Tuesday, returning to a team that just invigorated its roster after a blockbuster trade with the Miami Marlins. "I never would have guessed this could happen," he said at a news conference. Gibbons managed Toronto from 2004 to 2008 and had a 305-305 record, making him the third-winningest manager in franchise history. He succeeds John Farrell, who spurned Toronto for his dream managing job in Boston.
NEWS
January 14, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Carol Ann Hurff Ritchie, 74, of Gloucester City, a former manager at Campbell Soup Co., died of cardiac disease Tuesday, Dec. 31, at Samaritan Healthcare & Hospice Inpatient Center in Mount Holly. Born in Camden, Mrs. Ritchie graduated from Gloucester City High School in 1957. She worked for Campbell Soup for 39 years, beginning as a stenographer in the year of her graduation, and retiring as senior manager in corporate licensing in 1996, niece Susan Hoffman said. In 1988, as a member of the Orangutan Foundation International, a wildlife preservation group, Mrs. Ritchie made the first of 14 trips to Borneo, Hoffman said.
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SPORTS
October 21, 2014
FOR THE FOURTH time in 5 years, soccer fans in Philadelphia won't witness the hometown club in the MLS playoffs. But at the very least, the Union sent the PPL Park regulars out with a win. "I know we came up short and the focus now, the only word I use around the guys is playoffs for next year," Union interim manager Jim Curtin said after Saturday night's home finale, a 2-1 win over Sporting Kansas City. "We're not going to talk about championships or anything like that. We're talking about the playoffs for 2015 and that's the goal.
SPORTS
October 15, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
THE UNION pulled an astounding choke on Saturday night. In a span of 5 minutes, it blew a 2-0 lead late against the Columbus Crew to lose, 3-2, and got eliminated from the Major League Soccer playoff race. You decide which of the following statements sounds closer to the truth: In June, when he fired manager John Hackworth and replaced him with current interim manager Jim Curtin, Union CEO Nick Sakiewicz said: "I think we have a lot of quality in our team. We're a good team; we have quality in the locker room.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gregory Rowe, 63, of Berwyn, an arts and culture visionary, whose business and fund-raising strategies helped push Philadelphia's cultural progress, died at his home Friday, Oct. 3, after a 14-month battle with cancer. Mr. Rowe's knowledge of financial management led to one of the most successful periods in the history of People's Light & Theatre Company in Malvern, where he worked as managing director from 1983-1997. During that time, the theater's operating budget tripled, capital assets quadrupled, and it developed one of the country's largest arts-education programs - all while remaining free of operating debt.
NEWS
October 7, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
After more than 40 years bouncing in and out of the criminal justice system and mental-health institutions, Mae Harden was ready to strike out on her own. She and her psychiatrist sketched out a recovery plan. She set and achieved goals, becoming a certified peer specialist and earning a bachelor's degree from Chestnut Hill College. She gave up disability benefits and increased her work hours to full time, leading group therapy to help others cope with their mental illnesses. "But I still kept one secret.
SPORTS
September 26, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Union's interim manager, Jim Curtin, wanted to clear up some rumors and began Wednesday's news conference at PPL Park with a simple message: The interim tag has yet to be taken off. Curtin was responding to published reports that said it would happen. (The Inquirer reported that the sides were on the verge of a deal but that it was not completed.) This is not to suggest that Curtin won't have the tag removed, but as of Wednesday's news conference, his status had not changed.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drinker Biddle & Reath L.L.P. said Monday that CEO and chairman Alfred W. Putnam Jr. will be succeeded by Andrew C. Kassner, effective Feb. 1. Kassner, who has been serving as executive partner at the firm and who has been deeply involved in its management for years, is one of Drinker's top bankruptcy and restructuring partners. "Andy was the natural choice," said Putnam. "He has been our executive partner, with extensive management responsibilities, for almost a decade, and our partners see him as an effective leader with the experience and expertise to guide the firm going forward.
NEWS
September 23, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
International Housekeepers Week, celebrated worldwide in the hotel industry last week, resonates personally with Robert Allen, general manager of the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown. "My dad passed away when we were young," Allen said. "My mom needed to get a job, and she was a housekeeper in a hotel. You look and you see her come home after taking a bus, getting home at 7 p.m., and having to help me with homework. Cook a meal. Clean. "We can never do enough for these people," he said.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
An investigation into an unsuccessful investment by the Pennsylvania State Employees' Retirement System (SERS) has "found no evidence of illegality" by Anthony Clark, the system's former chief investment officer, who persuaded the system to pump $250 million into Tiger Management Advisors as the first step in a planned hedge fund strategy. "Whether Clark intentionally misled the board by seeking to conceal Tiger's poor performance is open to question," the investigator, former acting state attorney general Walter Cohen, added in his two-page note to the board summarizing his findings.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
T ESS MICHAELS, 20, of University City, is a social entrepreneur and a Penn senior pursuing a dual degree in management and life sciences. The Philly native is the founder and CEO of Soceana, a startup that launched in January with tech-enabled platforms to generate social good. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Soceana? A: I volunteered a lot in high school and saw a need for a unique approach. At Wharton, I found that the corporate space was an effective way to bridge volunteerism with philanthropy.
SPORTS
September 17, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
I WON'T exaggerate and claim that if the Union beats Seattle tonight at PPL Park and captures the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup, it will be as big as if it makes the playoffs and wins the MLS championship. The MLS Cup is the ultimate goal of professional soccer in the United States. It is this sport's equivalent of winning the Super Bowl, World Series, Stanley Cup or NBA Finals. In comparison, winning the Open Cup would be like winning the . . . well, there is no real equivalent in any other U.S. professional sport.
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