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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2011 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
In the February chill of 1975, a 15-year-old boy left his home in the Mexican state of Guanajuato, slipped illegally across the border at Yuma, Ariz., and boarded a plane for Philadelphia. Along with two older friends who joined him, Isidro Rodriguez was headed for snowbound Kennett Square. The promise of big money from working the mushroom farms there was the talk of their little city, Moroleón. "But it was a lie - and I didn't like it," recalls Rodriguez, who found hundreds of migrant workers from his town already toiling there in the dark, smelly, windowless cinder-block buildings for $1.85 an hour.
NEWS
January 14, 2012
Russell J. Roth Sr., 83, of Sellersville, who retired as an electronics manager in 1992, died Tuesday, Jan. 10, of pulmonary fibrosis at Grand View Hospital. Born in Rochester, N.Y., Mr. Roth graduated from high school there. He served in the Navy from September 1945 to April 1949 and again from 1950 to 1952. His daughter, Cynthia Mannes, said he served in shipboard fire-control units in the Mediterranean, then was recalled to duty during the Korean War. Mr. Roth earned his bachelor's degree at Rutgers University after night classes in the late 1960s, while he was a quality-control manager for Philco-Ford in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
June 27, 2011 | Associated Press
CHICAGO - Davey Johnson was named manager of the Washington Nationals on Sunday, three days after Jim Riggleman stunned the team by resigning. Johnson will manage the rest of the season and his first game will be Monday against the Los Angeles Angels. He has been a senior adviser with the team since 2009, though he hasn't managed in the big leagues since 2000 with the Los Angeles Dodgers. Johnson also agreed to a three-year consulting contract through 2013 that will allow him to remain with the team and help select a successor for next season.
NEWS
October 4, 2011
By Paul Jablow It would be a nightmare Rotisserie league lineup: Tony La Russa and Ron Washington as the double-play combination, Terry Francona at first, Joe Girardi behind the plate, and Charlie Manuel, with his .198 big-league batting average, alongside Ron Roenicke in the outfield. These guys - all marginal major-league players at best - were heading six of the 10 teams in contention for the playoffs in the final days of the baseball season. Three other top teams were led by managers who never made the majors.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
After more than six hours of debate, the Lower Merion Township commissioners voted late Wednesday to approve a $275,000 pay package for township manager Douglas Cleland. A minority of Republicans led by commissioner Jenny Brown tried without success to amend the two-year pact, which would have caused it to be tabled under Roberts Rules of Order. The vote was 8 to 5, with one member of the 14-member panel absent. The yes votes all came from Democrats; the no votes came from three Republicans and two Democrats who broke with party lines.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
Chris Stamp, 70, who as a cockney kid from East London aspired to make a documentary film about the rise of British rock in the 1960s and ended up helping discover and manage a raucous working-class quartet called The Who, died Nov. 24 in Manhattan. The cause was complications of colorectal cancer, his wife, Calixte, said. "I was knocked out," Mr. Stamp recalled in 1966 of the night he first saw The Who perform in 1964. "But the excitement I felt wasn't coming from the group. I couldn't get near enough.
SPORTS
January 7, 2013 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - There are more than a few Alabama folks who will tell you that junior AJ McCarron could be the best quarterback the Crimson Tide has had since, dare we say, Joe Namath. With apologies to Richard Todd (or was that Jay Barker?), that was nearly half a century ago. Yet when most people think about the defending national champions, the passing game probably isn't the first thing that comes to mind. Maybe it's defense, even if this one isn't Nick Saban's strongest.
SPORTS
November 22, 2012
John Gibbons was hired as manager of the Toronto Blue Jays for the second time Tuesday, returning to a team that just invigorated its roster after a blockbuster trade with the Miami Marlins. "I never would have guessed this could happen," he said at a news conference. Gibbons managed Toronto from 2004 to 2008 and had a 305-305 record, making him the third-winningest manager in franchise history. He succeeds John Farrell, who spurned Toronto for his dream managing job in Boston.
NEWS
January 14, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Carol Ann Hurff Ritchie, 74, of Gloucester City, a former manager at Campbell Soup Co., died of cardiac disease Tuesday, Dec. 31, at Samaritan Healthcare & Hospice Inpatient Center in Mount Holly. Born in Camden, Mrs. Ritchie graduated from Gloucester City High School in 1957. She worked for Campbell Soup for 39 years, beginning as a stenographer in the year of her graduation, and retiring as senior manager in corporate licensing in 1996, niece Susan Hoffman said. In 1988, as a member of the Orangutan Foundation International, a wildlife preservation group, Mrs. Ritchie made the first of 14 trips to Borneo, Hoffman said.
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A position in the Camden County Jail that has faced high turnover will be filled on an interim level this month, making that person who fills it the sixth jail population manager since 2011. The move comes amid a vacancy in the position and a letter from U.S. District Judge Jerome Simandle, who told county officials on Jan. 26 that he was "very concerned" about the turnover. The jail population manager focuses on how inmates are processed, from arrest to court date, and makes recommendations on how to improve their movement in the system.
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NEWS
February 20, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
A GRUESOME double-stabbing in the shadows of a small East Germantown tavern yesterday sent shockwaves through the upper reaches of the music industry. De'Von "Day Day" Pickett, a veteran road manager who worked with the likes of Nicki Minaj, Rihanna, Kanye West and Britney Spears, died after being stabbed numerous times in the torso about 2:30 a.m. while brawling with another man in front of the Che Bar & Grill, on Stenton Avenue near Johnson Street, police said. Pickett and a co-worker, Eric Parker, in Philly to help Minaj prepare for an upcoming tour, had visited the bar at the end of a long night on the town, choosing it because they were friends with one of the employees, a police source said last night.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writers
In his political branding, Gov. Christie is the blunt Jersey guy who'll tell you what he thinks even if you don't want to hear it. Yet a closer look at his rhetoric and policy actions shows Christie often straddles hot-button issues that divide conservative and moderate Republicans, a skill that will be tested in his expected campaign for the 2016 GOP presidential nomination. That tendency was highlighted last week when, at a pharmaceutical plant in Britain, Christie said parents should have "some measure of choice" about whether to vaccinate their children.
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A position in the Camden County Jail that has faced high turnover will be filled on an interim level this month, making that person who fills it the sixth jail population manager since 2011. The move comes amid a vacancy in the position and a letter from U.S. District Judge Jerome Simandle, who told county officials on Jan. 26 that he was "very concerned" about the turnover. The jail population manager focuses on how inmates are processed, from arrest to court date, and makes recommendations on how to improve their movement in the system.
NEWS
February 3, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
In Atlantic City, where Democrats outnumber Republicans nine to one, voters signaled a desire for change when they elected Republican Don Guardian mayor in 2013. Guardian had stated candidly and correctly that the city needed to fashion a new economy because the old one, based on casinos, was waning. Even as a third of the city's 12 casinos closed during his first year in office, Guardian seemed to be making the right moves. He has cut the budget, embraced heightened state fiscal supervision, and, unlike his insular predecessor, reached out to experts and Gov. Christie.
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William R. Johnson, 86, of Drexel Hill, a retired manager for Radio Corp. of America in Camden, died Friday, Jan. 23, of pneumonia at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital. For 35 years, Mr. Johnson worked in the broadcast systems division at RCA as a manufacturing administrator. "He was an accountant. He took care of their budget; he watched their money. He was the only non-engineer in the department. He really, really liked it," said daughter Susanne Davis. When General Electric bought RCA, he left that position but continued working part-time at St. Francis Country House in Darby Borough and Acro Display in the Hunting Park section of Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 24, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Suzette Parmley, and Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writers
Gov. Christie on Thursday installed an emergency management team in Atlantic City, asserting that outside assistance was needed to curtail the city's financial free fall. "I can't wait any longer," Christie said, addressing legislative leaders, Atlantic City and Atlantic County officials, casino executives, and union leaders at a third summit on the future of the Shore resort, where casino closures have decimated the tax base and deepened debt. While he said the move was not intended to undermine local officials, Christie said, "We need to take more aggressive action, and that's the action that I'm taking today.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg and Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writers
Update: Gov. Christie's office sent out an update officially announcing that a new "Atlantic City Emergency Management Team" would be introduced following the 11 am. Summit. The team will consist of Kevyn Orr, the former emergency manager for Detroit, which just emerged from bankruptcy, and Kevin Lavin, a corporate finance consultant at FTI Consulting who more typically advises financially troubled companies. ATLANTIC CITY - On the eve of Gov. Christie's third Atlantic City summit, City Council President Frank M. Gilliam Jr. said Wednesday night that the state was poised to bring in a powerful emergency manager to oversee city government.
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writerrussv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
Reuben Amaro expects to file for unemployment by the end of next month - or in early March. That's when the Saladworks in the Gallery will close for renovations at the Center City mall. Amaro, 48, has twice been manager of the restaurant, for a total of seven years. "I'm looking at unemployment for now," said the man with almost the same name as the Phillies' general manager. (The baseball Amaro spells his first name Ruben.) Amaro found out when he returned to work Dec. 16 - three days after his wedding - that the restaurant was shutting down for as long as two years.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Gov.-elect Tom Wolf continued to round out his cabinet Thursday, going outside the Pennsylvania State Police ranks for a new commissioner. Wolf tapped Marcus L. Brown, the current superintendent of the Maryland State Police, to lead the agency of more than 6,000 workers, at an annual salary of $145,025. In doing so, Wolf singled out Brown's commitment to diversity, noting that in Maryland he recruited in areas with high minority populations and at historically black colleges.
SPORTS
January 14, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Now that Oregon quarterback Marcus Mariota has been safely packed away in bubble wrap until the NFL draft - assuming his decision-making skills include knowing when to come out - it's time to pay attention again to the NFL team that certainly needs him, but almost certainly won't get him. The Eagles have been quiet since their New Year's Week celebration of organizational dysfunction, and they figure to remain quiet as long as possible. Any team that can release a star player and not say a peep for weeks will have little trouble avoiding comment on something small like the cafeteria food fight that upended Jeffrey Lurie's carefully balanced management flow chart.
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