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SPORTS
June 12, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Union CEO and operating partner Nick Sakiewicz said he believes that a disappointing year can be salvaged. That's why, with 18 games remaining in the Major League Soccer season, he made the move Tuesday to fire team manager John Hackworth. Assistant coach Jim Curtin, a former all-star with the Chicago Fire, was named interim head coach. Curtin, a 34-year-old Villanova graduate, will talk to the media Thursday. A year after setting a franchise record for wins during a 12-12-10 season and barely missing the playoffs, the Union stand at 3-7-6.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester County Emergency Management Director Ed Atkins, who led the department for 17 years, died Monday, according to the county. Judge Renee Cardwell Hughes, chief executive of the American Red Cross of Southeastern Pennsylvania, called Atkins "a great man" who always treated Red Cross volunteers with dignity and respect. "Every single day he committed himself to making Chester County a better place to live, and ensuring that the citizens of Chester County were safe," Hughes said in a video posted by the Red Cross.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just over a quarter-century ago, Robert "Bob" McClintock, a top executive in the management company that now runs the Convention Center, landed his first real job in convention center management. "I started out as a housekeeping supervisor at the old Philadelphia Civic Center," McClintock said. He was working there as part of an outside management firm hired to improve labor relations at the Civic Center. Does anything ever change in Philadelphia? Maybe not, because now McClintock works for SMG, the management company hired in December by the Convention Center, the Civic Center's successor building.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
The City of Philadelphia's pension system hired some new money managers at its regular board of trustees meeting Tuesday, awarding mandates to a number of investment firms, some known locally and others nationally. Pending completion of their contracts, the Board of Pensions and Retirement awarded new mandates to the following active managers in fixed-income, and domestic- and international-equity sectors: In domestic equity (small, mid-, and large capitalization), Brandywine, Lyrical, Hahn, Herndon, GW, and Apex received commitments of money from the city.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a deal that Mount Laurel-based PHH Corp. says will sharpen its overall strategic focus, enhance its financial flexibility, and position it to deliver greater shareholder value, the company has agreed to sell its fleet-management subsidiary for $1.4 billion to Element Financial Corp., of Toronto. PHH will remain in the mortgage production and servicing business. Element's purchase of PHH Arval - which has headquarters in Sparks, Md., $4.6 billion in total assets, and 1,000 employees - is expected to close on or before July 31. Dating from 1946, PHH Arval was the first fleet-management company in the United States, said spokesman Dico Akseraylian.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
MY 16-YEAR-OLD son will be working for the first time this summer. He already has plans to buy an iPad with his earnings, and he made the mistake of telling me. What followed was another one of my lectures that ended with him shaking his head. I'm sure my many money conversations will weigh heavily when he and his two sisters are possibly faced with determining who I may have to live with in my retirement years. I bet they'll play rock, paper and scissors to decide. Still, despite the moans and groans and threats of putting me in a nursing home, I lecture anyway.
SPORTS
June 2, 2014 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
What if Big Papi declared war and nobody joined up? It kind of looked that way at Fenway Park on Saturday evening, when the Tampa Bay Rays and Boston Red Sox tangled one night after David Price hit David Ortiz and Mike Carp with pitches in a 3-2 Sox win in a 10-inning game filled with beanballs, bench-clearing brawls (of the grab-your-partner do-si-do baseball type), and ejections. After Friday's game, Ortiz got all Bugs Bunny vs. Yosemite Sam about it, announcing "this means war" while preparing a Candygram rigged with a boxing glove.
NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pat Gusoff had what Umar Mycka calls "a yard full of trouble" at her Bustleton home. It wasn't so much the honeysuckle, mulberries, bittersweet, chokecherries, and English ivy, although they can be a nasty business. No, it was all those shiny, three-leaf shoots of Toxicodendron radicans, the dreaded poison ivy. Mycka knows this North American scourge intimately from four decades of work as a gardener/groundskeeper at the Philadelphia Zoo. Since 2008, he has also had a small business (idontwantpoisonivy.com)
NEWS
May 29, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alfred L. Glaudel, 90, of West Chester, a retired engineering manager for Westinghouse Electric Corp., died at his home Thursday, May 22, of complications from a heart ailment. He had moved to West Chester in 2008 to be with his daughter Annette after many years living in Lansdowne. Mr. Glaudel was born in Mahanoy City, Schuylkill County, the youngest of 11 children. He graduated from Mahanoy City High School, and served in the Navy from 1943 to 1946 during World War II. He was deployed to the Pacific Theater aboard the submarine USS Haddock.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Henry C. McGettigan's mother died when he was 9, he would spend some of his summer days with his maternal grandmother in North Philadelphia. "She would pack a lunch for him" and send him off to Shibe Park at 21st Street and Lehigh Avenue, the home of both the Athletics and the Phillies, daughter Theresa Miller said in a phone interview. "He would go and sit outside and listen to the game," through the roars of the crowds, in the days before portable radios, because he didn't have enough money to buy a ticket.
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