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NEWS
September 26, 2015 | By Tom Avril and Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Benjamin Franklin Parkway can accommodate close to 300,000 pedestrians with ample breathing room, crowd-safety experts say. But after months of preparation and shifting projections, how many people will actually show up to see Pope Francis this weekend? An even more critical question is how they will all stay safe. The U.S. Secret Service says it is preparing for something close to the 300,000 number within the Parkway's fenced-in secure zones. Festival organizers project more than one million attendees for Sunday's Mass, including people who will congregate outside the secure zones.
NEWS
September 19, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
He started as an entry-level engineer 27 years ago, and as Jeffrey D. Knueppel rose through SEPTA's ranks he prioritized connecting with workers on the front lines of the region's transportation. In his three years as deputy general manager Knueppel on 12 occasions spent long hours on the streets with workers, from bus drivers to transit cops. "I really think I made better decisions once I knew people's jobs," he said. It's a habit he wants to keep as the boss. Knueppel, 52, was selected to replace SEPTA general manager Joseph Casey at the transit agency's monthly board meeting Thursday.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Montgomery County money manager, who pleaded guilty to a $19 million fraud, on Wednesday was sentenced to just shy of five years in federal prison, with credit for 14 months already served. U.S. District Court Judge Legrome D. Davis in Philadelphia imposed a relatively light sentence because Tim Burns helped federal prosecutors secure a conviction in a California fraud case and because the judge was convinced that Burns has potential to lead a law-abiding life after prison. Also, Burns is helping with other investigations, his attorney, Thomas A. Bergstrom, told the judge.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
ONLY SIX DAYS into the school year, the School District of Philadelphia is re-evaluating its decision to overhaul the management of substitute teachers. Superintendent William Hite last night said he was disappointed with the performance of Source4Teachers, the company hired in June to recruit and manage subs, since schools opened Sept. 8. The firm has filled fewer than 25 percent of empty classrooms so far, leaving many kids and teachers in the lurch. Hite said the district is working with the Cherry Hill-based firm to increase the so-called fill rate by increasing pay, adding more recruiters and streamlining the hiring process.
NEWS
September 13, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new study finds that more aggressive treatment of high blood pressure in certain high-risk patients may extend their lives, the National Institutes of Health said Friday. Over a period of three years on average, patients were nearly 25 percent less likely to die if they took enough medicine to reduce their systolic blood pressure - the higher of those two numbers you hear at the doctor's office - to 120. Those patients were compared with a second group whose target systolic pressure was 140. Patients who got the more aggressive treatment also were 30 percent less likely to suffer a cardiovascular event such as a heart attack or stroke during the study period, the NIH said.
NEWS
September 12, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the June afternoon when the Phillies introduced him as their next president, Andy MacPhail looked at the standings and saw a 27-50 record, the worst in baseball. In his first week at Citizens Bank Park, he watched his new team lose four straight games to the lowly Milwaukee Brewers. At that point, he said Thursday, he did not think the decision he made this week would be as difficult as it turned out to be. But ultimately, after two-plus months of observations and analysis, MacPhail felt the Phillies needed a "fresh perspective" in the baseball operations department, and his vision for the team's rebuilding process did not include Ruben Amaro Jr. Amaro, the Phillies' much-maligned general manager, was ousted from his position after nearly seven years on Thursday with the team's announcement that his contract, set to expire at season's end, would not be renewed.
SPORTS
September 11, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
AFTER A WAIT of an hour and 57 minutes last night, the Phillies' game against the Chicago Cubs was postponed by rain. The teams will play a doubleheader at Citizens Bank Park tonight. Phillies rookie pitchers Adam Morgan and Alec Asher will start in the first game and in the nightcap, respectively. Anyone who waited nearly two hours last night only to race back to their cars through a teeming rain was given this: If they don't feel like coming back tonight, they can exchange their ticket for any 2016 game when individual tickets go on sale in February.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doylestown Health Partners, a joint venture between Doylestown Hospital and about 440 primary care and specialist physicians, entered a contract to manage Humana's 3,200 Medicare Advantage customers in Bucks and Montgomery Counties. Humana, based in Louisville, Ky., agreed in July to be acquired by Aetna for $37 billion. In July, Humana had 8,246 Medicare Advantage customers in the eight-country Philadelphia region. Nationwide, Humana has 1.5 million Medicare Advantage customers, the company said.
NEWS
September 2, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eleanor Moen McKinney, 84, of Brooklawn, manager of the former United Jersey Bank office in Gloucester City, died of heart failure Friday, Aug. 28, at Inspira Medical Center in Woodbury. Born in Gloucester City, Mrs. McKinney graduated in 1948 from what is now Gloucester City Junior-Senior High School. She began her banking career as a teller at the Gloucester City office of Camden Trust Co. in the 1950s, and stayed in that office over the years. "It was basically the same bank; it just kept changing names," a son, John D. III, said.
NEWS
September 2, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
J OHN CULVER battled cancer for 10 years, but if you called to find out how he was doing, he'd want to know how you were doing. If you asked him if he needed anything, he'd ask if you needed anything. To say John Culver was selfless, generous and compassionate would be understatements. Those words are descriptive, but inadequate. There was no summing up the kind of persona that John Culver presented to the world without getting into superlatives. John Culver, who held managerial jobs in circulation for the Daily News and Inquirer for 30 years, a former bank executive and a devoted and supportive Catholic, died Aug. 25 after a 10-year battle with cancer.
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