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Manayunk Canal

NEWS
May 3, 2012 | By Juliana Reyes
Behind the charming boutiques of Main Street in Manayunk sits a crude shell of a building. The property, which runs along the Manayunk Canal on a strip of land called Venice Island, is what's left of a 19th-century textile mill. It's basically four jagged, graffiti-covered walls with no roof and nothing inside — as if someone had started demolishing from the top and worked down, but never finished. "It's pretty gruesome," says Mike Yanofsky, who works on Main Street and was taking an afternoon stroll along the canal's boardwalk when we caught up with him. He noted the nearby construction of a new Venice Island recreation-and-performing-arts center and wondered, shouldn't something be done about this eyesore?
NEWS
January 13, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has received $1.3 million from a state funding initiative to extend the Cynwyd Heritage Trail in Lower Merion across the Schuylkill via the Manayunk Bridge. The announcement Wednesday adds one more link to the growing network of regional walking and biking pathways envisioned by planners for the Philadelphia area. Someday, planners project, it will be possible to get on a bike near the Philadelphia Museum of Art and ride to the farthest reaches of the suburbs. Parts of the network are built, said Christopher Leswing, Lower Merion assistant director of building and planning, but much remains to be done.
NEWS
December 3, 2009
You'll spend perhaps a third of your time living in a place, but you have a permanent residence hundreds of miles away. You might have to pull up stakes at any time. But you don't want to rent a furnished place. You want something with your own stamp so you can feel totally comfortable in it. For Royal Ivey of the 76ers, the answer was an apartment in Venice Lofts in Manayunk. By renting a luxury apartment and most of its furniture and then turning his family and his work into decorating motifs, the backup guard has created an oasis away from the nomadic stresses of professional basketball.
NEWS
November 10, 2006 | By Dafney Tales FOR THE INQUIRER
For artist Diane Pieri, it's the most authentic symbol of Manayunk: the stoop. With that in mind, Pieri accepted a commission to create "Manayunk Stoops: Heart and Home," an array of colorful stoops built along the walking path between the Schuylkill and the neighborhood. The public art project, a part of the reconstruction of the Manayunk Canal Towpath, once a neglected eyesore, serves both artistic and practical purposes. The nine mosaic stoops, stretching on the block between Cotton and Lock Streets, also serve as seats for the foot-weary.
NEWS
November 16, 2005 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a symbol of Manayunk's vibrant past and, it is hoped, a more vibrant future. And it's a miracle the Manayunk Canal is here at all. "Absolutely," said Nicole Galdieri, president of the Friends of the Manayunk Canal, a nine-year-old volunteer group that monitors and lobbies for the canal. "It's one of the last two sections that still exist. " Galdieri, 25, is a transplanted " 'Yunker" and a University of Pennsylvania grad student working on dual degrees in environmental studies and city planning.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2005 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A second residential building boom is developing in Manayunk, the neighborhood of mills from another era that has become a shopping and dining mecca along the Schuylkill. Construction has started on two big condominium projects, and a third is planned. By year's end, 650 residential units will be under construction in these projects in the hillside Philadelphia neighborhood of 5,000 residents. A fourth is being planned across the river in Montgomery County. In collaboration with that project, Lower Merion Township wants to enhance public access to its riverfront and create new pedestrian links to Manayunk.
NEWS
February 10, 2003 | By Darlene Messina
The headline on a front-page article on Dec. 22 reads: "New strategy on flooding: Don't rebuild, just get out. " Three days later, an article tucked away in the middle of the paper is headlined, "Ruling clears way for Manayunk units: Luxury apartments on flood-prone Venice Island got the green light from Commonwealth Court. " And then we have this headline on Jan. 12: "Danger an issue, U.S. set to remap flood-prone areas: New maps could save $48 billion in property damage, FEMA estimates.
NEWS
December 17, 1999 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite protests from Manayunk residents, City Council yesterday took a major step in opening Venice Island to residential development. By a vote of 13-3, Council rezoned from industrial to residential about half the 300-acre island, which sits between the Schuylkill and the Manayunk Canal. Councilman Michael Nutter, who sponsored the measure, called the change a tool to "better control and better manage any potential growth on Venice Island. " But Councilman David Cohen - who asked Nutter to withdraw the rezoning - called the move "hasty" and "foolhardy.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1998 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What's long, narrow, surrounded by water, located in Manayunk, and has only one - count it, o-n-e - restaurant? Venice Island. But maybe not for long. The 300-acre slip of land between the Schuylkill and the Manayunk Canal is turning into the latest battleground between the flatlanders who run Main Street's playground of eateries, clothing stores and art galleries, and the locals living on the hills behind them. Right now, the island is home to a couple of factories, a recreation center, some parking lots and that single restaurant, the Arroyo Grille.
NEWS
May 27, 1998 | By Laura J. Bruch, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Right near Locks 69 and 70 of the Manayunk Canal, where the water comes tumbling down in a gush of white, four men are pulling up bass so effortlessly that you would think the fish were holding a convention at their feet. Gracefully, the men cast their lines, watch as the lines become taut, and bring in fish in a scene nearly as timeless as the river. "I was born right across the street," Mike Kuneck, 67, confides quietly as he takes a break from fishing. "I was here when they built the town up. " The town he is referring to, the Manayunk of arty boutiques and intriguing restaurants, is nearby, but you would hardly know it. That Manayunk still turns its back on the river.
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