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Manayunk

NEWS
May 19, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
LOCAL PERFORMERS will have to wait a few more months for the curtain to rise at the Venice Island Performing Arts Center & Recreation Park in Manayunk. The completion of the venue, a project more than 10 years in the making, has been pushed back from June 5 due to a variety of factors, city officials have said. The biggest culprit? Torrential rains late last month that flooded the construction site on Venice Island, sandwiched between the Manayunk Canal and the Schuylkill. Tom Dignam, the city Parks and Recreation Department's performing-arts coordinator, said no specific date has been set for the opening, but estimates it'll be sometime in the fall, possibly October.
NEWS
May 11, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The hum of gas-powered generators and the smell of mildew filled the air Friday at the Manayunk Brewing Co. as a crew worked. Cases of the company's canned beer on wooden pallets lined a wall outside the 18,000-square-foot restaurant, brewery, and banquet room on Main Street in the city's Manayunk section. What was missing on this afternoon was the lunchtime crowd - and the lights. More than a week after torrential rain caused massive flooding in the community along the Schuylkill, the 18-year-old craft brewery remained without power after 51/2 feet of river water deluged the former textile mill and ruined its electrical system.
NEWS
May 5, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Peter Korn grew up in Mount Airy and Rydal and was educated at Germantown Friends School and the University of Pennsylvania, where he majored in history. His father, a Philadelphia lawyer, was expecting his son to follow a conventional career path by becoming a lawyer, too, or a doctor, professor, or stockbroker. Instead, Korn went to Nantucket and got a job as a carpenter. His father may have been dismayed that his son was working with his hands, but Korn loved it. "From the start, there was a mind/body wholeness to carpentry that put it way ahead of what I imagined office work to be," Korn writes in his new book, Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman.
NEWS
May 3, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jon Cordo and Glenna Breslin moved to the Venice Lofts for the ambience - a mix of Industrial Age textile mills and modern amenities, nestled between the Schuylkill and the Manayunk Canal. "We wanted water views," Cordo said Thursday as rescue workers were evacuating his neighbors from the flooded island. "We have them now. " The couple had experience with rising waters - they'd weathered Hurricane Sandy in Hoboken, N.J. But that October 2012 disaster gave enough advance notice for them to stock up on wine and bottled water.
NEWS
January 24, 2014
WELL, AREN'T THEY a fine group of ingrates? The millennials, I mean, the "youth" group between 20 and 34. They love Philadelphia, but half don't plan on staying, a study by the Pew Charitable Trusts tells us. It's like Philly's good enough to date, but not to marry. There's a huge difference between someone 20 - barely an adult on life's doorstep - and someone 34, who's already launched a life, career and often a family, but we'll let that slide. The largest demographic in Philadelphia now is people 25 to 29. Maybe they don't trust anyone older than 30. (Yet.)
FOOD
January 17, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
To visit the Sweet Note Bagels bakery, a spare, 600-square-foot manufacturing space within the old Le Bus headquarters in Manayunk, you'll have to sign a nondisclosure form, or, at least, pledge not to reveal any trade secrets. After all, a good gluten-free bagel is hard to find, and even harder to make. And Sweet Note founder Michelle MacDonald, 28, has learned from experience that plenty of people would like to get their hands on her patent-pending process. Her company, which is 15 months old and run by three women under 30, is selling 5,000 bagels a week, serving 70 restaurants and shops in five states.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Erin stepped onto the patio of her friends' Ardmore home to get a little air. She saw some guys hanging out on the other side of the short wall separating the twin home's space from the neighbors'. But more important: beagles! "Oh, hi!" Erin said, bounding over the wall that August night in 2010. "I'm Erin. What's your dogs' names?" Erin was most enthralled by "this chubby little dog" named Mildred. Mildred's person, Andrew, was enthralled with Erin. "I thought she was really cute," he said.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A THIEF IN Northwest Philadelphia is apparently a student of the Bart Simpson school of burglary. Police report that an man spent about 45 minutes Wednesday morning using a slingshot in an attempt to break into the Palm Tree Market on Cresson Street near Levering in Manayunk. Surveillance footage released yesterday shows the Dennis the Menace wannabe cocking his weapon in the vestibule in front of the store. It took him nearly an hour, but the less-than-crackshot eventually forced his way inside at roughly 5 a.m., after cracking a pane in the market's front door.
NEWS
December 7, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alex Horanzy was fast asleep that fateful Sunday morning. The Army private had just finished a week of combat training on the northern end of Oahu and slipped into bed at 2 a.m. at the Schofield Barracks. A few hours later, he woke to a nightmare: concussive bomb blasts and automatic gunfire from low-flying Japanese Zeros, smashing aircraft at adjacent Wheeler Army Airfield and Navy warships at nearby Pearl Harbor. "You could see the pilots very plainly right at the rooftops, doing their dirty work," said the 91-year-old Horanzy, who grew up in Manayunk and now lives in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The scene: a Saturday afternoon in December. A Santa appears in the frame, walking through Old City. Muscular and tall, not your usual Santa, but, OK, you can deal with a slender Santa. Then a short, blond guy Santa appears in Rittenhouse Square. Then a goateed African American Santa, similarly appointed in the usual red-and-white fur, materializes in Washington Square. Two redheaded women, decked in Santa gear, appear in University City and the Italian Market. That's when you realize: You're in the middle of the Running of the Santas, a Philly-originated tradition (created 1998)
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